Bobby Colomby

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Bobby Colomby (born Robert Wayne Colomby, 20 December 1944, in New York) is a jazz-rock fusion drummer, and an original member of the group Blood, Sweat & Tears. He is also the uncredited drummer on John Cale and Terry Riley's collaboration album Church of Anthrax.[citation needed]

Early life and family[edit]

Colomby graduated from the City College of NY with a degree in Psychology, and his elder brother Harry Colomby was the manager of Thelonious Monk.

Career[edit]

Colomby played on Blood, Sweat & Tears' 1970 self-titled album, a critical and commercial hit which won the Grammy Award for Album of the Year. After many changes in the group he became (in the end) the de facto owner of the Blood Sweat & Tears name.

Colomby produced jazz bass virtuoso Jaco Pastorius' first solo album; The Jacksons' comeback album Destiny; Chris Botti's albums December, When I Fall in Love, To Love Again and Italia; Paula Cole's album Courage and Jeff Lorber's album He Had a Hat.

For a few years in the late 1980s Bobby Colomby was a reporter for the television programs Entertainment Tonight and "The CBS Morning Program." He also hosted "In Person from the Palace".

In 2000, Colomby and Richard Marx created Signal 21 Records.[1] The label released only one album, Richard Marx's Days in Avalon, before folding shortly thereafter.

Personal life[edit]

Colomby is married to Donna Abbott, a graphic designer and native of California.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Navarre sends out Signal 21". Business Wire. 2000. 

Bobby produced "Pages" first album entitled "Pages," whose members included Richard Page, who was a member of the band Mister Mr.

External links[edit]

  • Drummer world entry [1]
  • 1998 Interview [2]
  • IMDB Entry [3]