Bobby Hackett (swimmer)

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Bobby Hackett
Personal information
Full name Robert William Hackett, Jr.
Nickname(s) "Bobby"
Nationality  United States
Born (1959-08-15) August 15, 1959 (age 55)
Yonkers, New York
Height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight 183 lb (83 kg)
Sport
Sport Swimming
Stroke(s) Freestyle
Club Bernal's Gator Swim Club
College team Harvard University

Robert William Hackett, Jr. (born August 16, 1959) is an American former competition swimmer, Olympic medalist, and former world record-holder. He represented the United States at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Quebec as a 16-year-old, where he won a silver medal in the men's 1500-meter freestyle, finishing behind U.S. teammate Brian Goodell.[1]

He was coached under Coach Joe Bernal. Bernal, who is still the head coach of Bernal's Gator Swim Club in Boston, Massachusetts, was known to have given Hackett 100 x 100's on the 1:00. Hackett still holds one of the oldest National Age Group records, a 15:03.91 in the 1,500-meter freestyle. He set the record by shattering the previous record at the 1976 Olympics.

Rutgers Coach Chuck Warner wrote a book showing the young swimmers of New Jersey that an Olympic road is not an easy one. He and three other swimmers Tim Shaw, Stephen Holland, and Brian Goodell are the targeted Olympians in this case. Hackett attended a meeting that Chuck Warner had planned with his 2009-2010 Arete Swim Camp team. He expressed what had happened those years with the Olympics.

Currently, Hackett is living and working in the New York metro area, near where he grew up. He has made a living in commercial real estate and is volunteer coaching with the Boys and Girls Club of Northern Westchester Marlins.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Bobby Hackett – Olympic athlete profile at Sports-Reference.com


Records
Preceded by
Australia Stephen Holland
Men's 800-meter freestyle
world record-holder (long course)

June 21, 1976 – March 23, 1979
Succeeded by
Soviet Union Vladimir Salnikov