Bobby Locke (baseball)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the former golfer, see Bobby Locke.
Bobby Locke
Pitcher
Born: (1934-03-03) March 3, 1934 (age 80)
Rowes Run, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 18, 1959 for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1968 for the California Angels
Career statistics
Earned run average 4.02
Record 16-15
Strikeouts 194
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • Hit home run in first major league game

Lawrence Donald "Bobby" Locke (born March 3, 1934 in Rowes Run, Pennsylvania) is a former right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played from 1959 to 1968 for the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and California Angels. He stood 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m) tall and weighed 185 pounds.[1] He was sometimes called Larry, and at one point worked as a hairstylist.[2]

Major League career[edit]

Cleveland Indians[edit]

Locke was signed originally by the Indians as an amateur free agent in 1953. He made his big league debut with them at the age of 25 on June 18, 1959[1] against the Boston Red Sox.[3] He was the starting pitcher for the Indians, and his first pitch was to Don Buddin.[3] After recording two outs, the first hit he gave up was to Vic Wertz which resulted in Gene Stephens scoring the first run against Locke.[3] In his debut he pitched for five and two thirds innings and gave up five runs,[3] but still managed to walk away with the no-decision. However his main contribution on his debut was hitting a home run off Frank Sullivan, which resulted in three runs being scored.[3] This was to be the only home run of his career.[1]

In 1959 overall, he posted a solid 3.13 ERA in 24 games, seven of them started. He struck out 40 batters, walked 41 and posted a record of 3–2.[1]

In 1960, Locke posted a mediocre 3–5 record, even though his ERA was a fairly low 3.37. He started 11 of the 32 games he appeared in and struck out 53 batters in 123 innings of work. He completed the only two games of his career that year as well. Both of them were shutouts.[1]

Compared to his previous two seasons, Locke did not perform as well in 1961, posting a 4.53 ERA while giving up 112 hits in 9513 innings. He walked 40 batters and struck out only 37 and posted a 4–4 record.[1]

Career after the Indians[edit]

After the 1961 season, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs for Jerry Kindall.[4]

He moved to the St Louis Cardinals for the 1962 season but after only playing one game with them he moved to the Philadelphia Phillies.[5]

Between 1962 and 1964 he played in 22 games for the Phillies, with a record of one win and no losses.[5]

After the 1964 season, he was purchased by the Angels, but did not appear in a big league uniform with them that year. In July 1965, he was traded to the Reds for Jim Coates and a player to be named later, although the player to be named later was never determined. He posted a poor 5.71 ERA in 1965, appearing in 11 games for the Reds.[citation needed]

He was repurchased by the Angels in June 1966, although he didn't appear in a single major league game that year. He did appear in nine games in 1967, however. He started his first game since 1961 that year, and overall he went 3–0 with a 2.33 on the season.[citation needed]

1968 would he his final season, ending his career on a sour note. Even though 1968 was considered "the year of the pitcher", Locke still managed to post a 6.44 ERA in 29 games for the Angels.[citation needed]

He played his final game on September 29, 1968.[citation needed]

Totals[edit]

Overall, Locke posted a 16–15 record in 165 games. In 41623 innings pitched, he walked 165 batters and struck out 194 while allowing 432 hits. He was a solid batter in his career, collecting 25 hits in 98 at-bats for .255 career batting average. The three extra base hits he collected in his career - two doubles and a home run - were all collected in his first two big league seasons. As a fielder, he posted a .968 fielding percentage.

References[edit]