Biological system

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A biological system is a complex network of biologically relevant entities. As biological organization spans several scales, examples of biological systems are populations of organisms, or on the organ- and tissue scale in mammals and other animals, the circulatory system, the respiratory system, the nervous system, etc.

On the micro- to the nanoscopic scale, examples of biological systems are cells, organelles, macromolecular complexes and regulatory pathways.

A biological system is not to be confused with a living system, which is commonly referred to as life. For further information see e.g. definition of life or synthetic biology.

Organ and tissue systems[edit]

An example of a system: The nervous system. This basic diagram shows that this system is made up of 4 different basic organs: the brain, the cerebellum, the spinal cord, and the nerves.

These specific systems are widely studied in Human anatomy. "Human" systems are also present in many other animals.

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