Bodybuilding in Australia

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Bodybuilding in Australia
Country Australia
National team Australia

Bodybuilding in Australia predates the 1970s, and both men and women have historically competed in it. The sport has a national governing body that is recognised by the International Federation of Bodybuilding and Fitness. Competition wise, Australia is not included in the South Pacific region.

History[edit]

Historically in Australia, women involved with body building have been talked openly about their plans to marry. This was to prevent rumours about their sexuality.[1] The 1970s saw an increase in the number of women participating in the sport.[2] As an organized sport, bodybuilding officially came to Australia in 1981, having been brought to the country by Americans.[3] The most highly visible Australian woman bodybuilder in the early period of the sport was Bev Francis who made the switch from athletics and powerlifting. Her success was limited at times because judges viewed her as too muscular.[3]

In 1974, Arnold Schwarzenegger visited Australia as guest poser at an amateur competition that Austrian born Canberra based Harry Haureliuk participated in, his first bodybuilding competition.[4] In 1980, Arnold Schwarzenegger won the Mr. Olympian which was hosted in Sydney, Australia.[5]

During the 1980s, Australia's bodybuilding culture involved a lot of steroid use.[4] Natural bodybuilding competitions started to take place in the country during the 1990s.[4]

Noumea, New Caledonia hosted the 2010 South Pacific Bodybuilding Federation Congress. An Australian judge attended.[6]

Governance[edit]

Australia has a national organization that is a recognized by the International Federation of Bodybuilding and Fitness as national federation, representing the country's bodybuilding community.[7]

Competitions[edit]

According to the South Pacific Bodybuilding Federation, for the purposes of regional competitions, Australia and New Zealand are not considered part of the South Pacific.[6]

Pictures[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stell, Marion K. (1991). Half the Race, A history of Australian women in sport. North Ryde, Australia: Harper Collins. p. 183. ISBN 0-207-16971-3. 
  2. ^ Stell, Marion K. (1991). Half the Race, A history of Australian women in sport. North Ryde, Australia: Harper Collins. p. 252. ISBN 0-207-16971-3. 
  3. ^ a b Stell, Marion K. (1991). Half the Race, A history of Australian women in sport. North Ryde, Australia: Harper Collins. p. 255. ISBN 0-207-16971-3. 
  4. ^ a b c Chris Wilson (23 January 2013). "Harry muscles up with Arnie". Australia: Canberra Times. Retrieved 1 February 2014. 
  5. ^ Robert H. Kennedy (20 August 2013). Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding. Robert Kennedy Publishing. ISBN 978-1-55210-130-8. 
  6. ^ a b "South Pacific Bodybuilding Federation 2010 Congress (The South Pacific Arm of the WBPF)". South Pacific Bodybuilding Federation. 2010. Retrieved 1 February 2014. 
  7. ^ "International Federation Of Bodybuilding And Fitness". European Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation. 2013. Retrieved 1 February 2014.