Boguila

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Boguila
Boguila is located in Central African Republic
Boguila
Boguila
Location in Central African Republic
Coordinates: 5°53′0″N 16°32′0″E / 5.88333°N 16.53333°E / 5.88333; 16.53333Coordinates: 5°53′0″N 16°32′0″E / 5.88333°N 16.53333°E / 5.88333; 16.53333
Country Central African Republic
Prefecture Ouham-Pendé
[1]

Boguila is a town located in the Central African Republic prefecture of Ouham-Pendé.

According to Medecins Sans Frontieres,

Since the coup d’état in March 2013, Boguila has been unstable with increasing tensions and violence. In August 2013, a peak of violence provoked a massive population displacement in the area. In December 2013, Muslims fleeing violence from Nana Bakassa sought refuge with host families in Boguila before moving further north.[2]

Between January and October 2013, approximately 95,000 people in the areas surrounding the town received treatment for malaria.[3]

On April 11, 2014, "nearly 7000 people fled to the bush after fighting erupted in Boguila."[2] Chadian troops were escorting a convoy of "the last 540 Muslim residents of the northwestern town of Bossangoa to Goré, Chad," and were attacked by local militia as they passed through Boguila.[4] On April 28, 2014, Medecins Sans Frontieres announced it would suspend its activities in Boguila, after "rebels affiliated with the Séléka group" opened fire in a hospital, "killing at least 16 people."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Boguila [5°53'0"N 16°32'0"E] Map". Central African Republic Google Satellite Maps, maplandia.com. Retrieved 2014-04-29. 
  2. ^ a b "Central African Republic: Thousands of people flee fighting in Boguila town". Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) International. 2014-04-12. Retrieved 2014-04-29. 
  3. ^ "Aid agencies struggle to reach all of CAR’s needy". La Nouvelle Centrafrique, Central African News agency. 2013-12-11. Retrieved 2014-04-29. 
  4. ^ "BOGUILA: Thousands flee gun battle as Chad withdraws from CAR". Voxafrica. 2014-04-16. Retrieved 2014-04-29. 
  5. ^ "Medecins Sans Frontieres rethinks the Central African Republic". Deutsche Welle. 2014-04-28. Retrieved 2014-04-29.