Boina Kingdom

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The Kingdom of Boina (sometimes known as Iboina) was a traditional state situated in what is now Madagascar.

The kingdom was founded c. 1690 by King Andriamandisoarivo. It was centered on Boina Bay in north-west Madagascar. Some time after 1832 it was occupied by Imerina and was annexed by Madagascar in 1840. The last ruler of this kingdom was Queen Tsiomeko.

Boina in the north west and Menabe in the west were the kingdoms sprong[clarification needed] in the 18th century. The king of Boina was considered to be quasi-divine, interceding with god and ancestors. The land belonged to him. In the extreme north of the island the Antankarana kingdom paid tribute to Boina.[1]

Rulers of Boina[edit]

  • c. 1690-1720 – Andriamandisoarivo (Tsimanata)
  • c. 1720-1730 – Andrianamboniarivo
  • c. 1730-1760 – Andriamahatindriarivo
  • c. 1760-1767 – Andrianahilitsy
  • 1767-1770 – Andrianiveniarivo
  • 1770-1771 – Andrianihoatra
  • 1771-1777 – Andrianikeniarivo
  • 1777-1778 – Andrianaginarivo (f)
  • 1778 – Tombola (f)
  • c. 1778-1808 – Ravahiny (f)
  • 1808-1822? – Tsimalomo
  • 1808 – Maka (Andrianaresy) (pretender)
  • 1822-1832 – Andriantsoly
  • 1828-1829 – Oantitsy (f) - Regent
  • 1832-1836 – Oantitsy
  • 1836-1840 – Tsiomeko

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. D. Fage, John E. Flint, Roland Anthony Oliver (1986). The Cambridge History of Africa: From c. 1790 to c. 1870, Volume 5. v. p. 396.