Boji Tower

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Boji Tower
Michigan National Tower Profile.JPG
Boji Tower as seen looking west over Allegan Street
General information
Type Office
Location 124 West Allegan Street, Lansing, Michigan, USA
Construction started 1929
Completed 1931
Height
Antenna spire 110.9 m (364 ft)
Roof 90.5 m (297 ft)
Technical details
Floor count 23 above ground & 2 underground
Floor area 185,188.77 sq ft (17,204.600 m2)
Design and construction
Architect Hopkins & Dentz
Capital Bank Tower
Boji Tower is located in Michigan
Boji Tower
Location 124 West Allegan Street, Lansing, Michigan
Coordinates 42°43′58″N 84°33′11″W / 42.73278°N 84.55306°W / 42.73278; -84.55306Coordinates: 42°43′58″N 84°33′11″W / 42.73278°N 84.55306°W / 42.73278; -84.55306
Area less than one acre
Built 1931
Architect Hopkins and Dentz; Builder: Hutter onstruction Co.
Architectural style Art Deco, Skyscraper
Governing body Private
MPS Downtown Lansing MRA
NRHP Reference # 05001357[1]
Added to NRHP December 6, 2005

The Boji Tower, also known as the Olds Tower is a historic 23-story building located at 124 Allegan Street, in Lansing, Michigan. It has been the tallest building in Lansing, since its completion in 1931. On December 6, 2005, the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places as the Capital Bank Tower.[1]

History[edit]

The tower was originally constructed as the Olds Tower, named after the automotive industrialist, Ransom Eli Olds, who was the main financier of the tower project assisted by Edmund C. Shields of the local law firm of Thomas Shields & Silsbee.[2] Shortly thereafter it was renamed Capital National Bank Tower, after the bank that Ransom Eli Olds helped form. The cornerstone was laid on November 14, 1929.[2]

It became the Michigan National Bank Tower in 1954, and held that name until 2001 when Michigan National Bank was bought out by Standard Federal Bank. At the request of Standard Federal Bank, the owners of the tower removed the historic neon 'Michigan National' sign in that year. After four-and-a-half years without a name, it was renamed Boji Tower in 2005 after the Boji family, a father and son development team of Iraqi descent, who had owned the tower since 1998.[3]

The tower has been through one major expansion which occurred between 1965 and 1967, which include the addition of an 11-story annex built directly adjacent to the front of the tower. The tower has undergone multiple minor renovations since 1998 under the Boji Group's ownership. In November 2007, the buildings original antenna tower was replaced by helicopter for a new one to handle new antennas for WJZL.[4]

Description[edit]

At 23 stories, and 297 feet (91 m), the brick and limestone-faced tower, with its tall, narrow profile topped with a spire and beacon, is a typical American skyscraper design of the Art Deco era of high-rise architecture. It includes four engraved panels in the portals of the main passenger elevators that reflect themes of labor and industry. The tower's facade consists of 654,000 bricks of 17 different colors. The building is occupied by a mix of office, retail, and government tenants. The two-story former banking lobby is now used as the main hearing room for the Michigan Senate.

Photo gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  2. ^ a b Dawe, Eric. "Lansing Celebrating 150 Years". WILX.com. Retrieved 30 December 2012. 
  3. ^ Murray, Stephanie (10 March 2005). "Tallest Building in Lansing Gets New Name". Lansing State Journal. 
  4. ^ Austerman, Mike (5 November 2007). "Mid-Michigan: Newsmakers Nov 5, 2007". Michiguide.com. Retrieved 7 March 2012. 

External links[edit]