Haganai

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Haganai
Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukanai Cover Volume 1.jpg
Cover of the first Japanese novel published by MF Bunko J showing main characters Kodaka Hasegawa, left, and Yozora Mikazuki, right
僕は友達が少ない
(Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai)
Genre Harem, Comedy
Light novel
Written by Yomi Hirasaka
Illustrated by Buriki
Published by Media Factory
Demographic Male
Imprint MF Bunko J
Original run August 31, 2009 – ongoing
Volumes 9
Manga
Haganai: I Don't Have Many Friends
Written by Yomi Hirasaka
Illustrated by Itachi
Published by Media Factory
English publisher
Demographic Seinen
Magazine Monthly Comic Alive
Original run March 27, 2010 – ongoing
Volumes 10
Manga
Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai+
Written by Misaki Harukawa
Illustrated by Shouichi Taguchi
Published by Shueisha
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Jump SQ.19
Original run November 19, 2010June 19, 2012
Volumes 2
Anime television series
Directed by Hisashi Saitō
Written by Tatsuhiko Urahata
Music by Tom-H@ck
Studio AIC Build
Licensed by
Network TBS, MBS
Original run October 7, 2011December 23, 2011
Episodes 13 (List of episodes)
Light novel
Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Universe
Written by Yomi Hirasaka, Yūji Yūji, Wataru Watari, Yū Shimizu, Sou Sagara, Asaura, Hajime Asano, Ryō Iwanami, Shirō Shiratori, Takaya Kagami
Illustrated by Buriki, Kantoku, Ruroo, Peco, QP:flapper, Miyama-Zero, Shunsaku Tomose, Yuu Kamiya, Koin, Ponkan8, Hanpen Sakura
Published by Media Factory
Demographic Male
Imprint MF Bunko J
Original run November 11, 2011 – ongoing
Volumes 2
Game
Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Portable
Publisher Namco Bandai
Genre Visual novel
Platform PlayStation Portable
Released February 23, 2012
Original video animation
Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Add On Disc
Directed by Hisashi Saitō
Written by Tatsuhiko Urahata
Music by Tom-H@ck
Studio AIC Build
Released September 26, 2012
Light novel
Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai CONNECT
Written by Yomi Hirasaka
Illustrated by Buriki
Published by Media Factory
Demographic Male
Imprint MF Bunko J
Published December 25, 2012
Anime television series
Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai NEXT
Directed by Toru Kitahata
Written by Yomi Hirasaka
Music by Tom-H@ck
Studio AIC Build
Licensed by
Network TBS, MBS
Original run January 11, 2013March 29, 2013
Episodes 12 (List of episodes)
Live-action film
Directed by Takurō Oikawa
Written by Takurō Oikawa
Studio Times-In
Released February 1, 2014 (2014-02-01)
Portal icon Anime and Manga portal

Haganai (はがない?), short for Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai (僕は友達が少ない?, literally "I Don't Have Many Friends"),[note 1] is a Japanese light novel series written by Yomi Hirasaka, illustrated by Buriki, and published by Media Factory. It has been given several manga adaptations; the first incarnation, its title and basic plot unchanged, began serialization in 2010; it was written and illustrated by Itachi and published in Monthly Comic Alive. A retelling of the series, written by Misaki Harukawa and illustrated by Shuichi Taguchi and called Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai+ was published in Jump SQ.19. A 12-episode anime adaptation by AIC Build aired in Japan between October and December 2011. An original video animation episode was released on September 26, 2012. A second anime season, Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai NEXT, aired between January and March 2013. A live-action film adaptation was released on February 1, 2014.

Conception[edit]

Yomi Hirasaka had been working on Light Novel Club, which consisted of short stories about everyday life. In developing Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai or Haganai for short, Hirasaka contrasts the main characters as opposites of the ones in the Light Novel Club which had good relationships to begin with. Hirasaka drew influences from personal experience: "This novel is a story about myself who also had few friends, bad communication skills, negative thinking, lacking life experiences and useless delusional habits." Hirasaka also considers the setting of the stories to be less restrictive. Hirasaka plans to keep writing volumes depending on how well it sells.[LN 1 afterword] The anime was directed by Hisashi Saito, who had previously directed the fan-service-heavy romantic comedy Heaven's Lost Property.[1]

Plot[edit]

Kodaka Hasegawa, a transfer student to St. Chronica's Academy, has found it difficult to make friends because of his mix of brown-blond hair[1] (inherited from his deceased English mother) and fierce-looking eyes that make him look like a delinquent. One day, he accidentally comes across the equally solitary and very abrasive Yozora Mikazuki as she converses with "Tomo", her imaginary friend. Realizing that they lack social lives and skills, they decide that the best way to improve their situation is to form the Neighbor's Club (隣人部 Rinjin-bu?), "an after-school club for people with no friends like themselves".[1] Other students with various backgrounds join the club: Sena Kashiwazaki is an attractive but arrogant idol, who has no female friends, and the men around her act as slaves; Yukimura Kusunoki is a feminine underclassman who idolizes Kodaka and strives to become manly like him; Rika Shiguma is a perverted genius scientist; and Kodaka's little sister Kobato thinks she is a vampire.[1]

Characters[edit]

Neighbor's Club[edit]

  • Kodaka Hasegawa (羽瀬川 小鷹 Hasegawa Kodaka?) is the viewpoint character of the light novels; he is a transfer student who has been unable to make friends in his first month at St. Chronica's.[LN 1] He and Yozora Mikazuki start the Neighbor's Club with the purpose of learning how to make friends and how to act in social situations. He has a gentle and balanced personality; but his unusual spotty-blond hair color, inherited from his late English mother, leads classmates to assume he is a violent and abusive delinquent and to spread defamatory rumors about him.[LN 1][ch. 6][ch. 10] Because of his reputation, Kodaka has become accustomed to conflicts and having to defend himself.[LN 1] Prior to the series, Kodaka has often moved because of his father's work as an archeologist. He has few memories related to home life, and no friends besides a single childhood friend from ten years ago, whose name eludes him at first,[LN 1] but later discovers is Yozora.[ch. 28,29] He does not show any romantic intentions towards anyone in the club until Sena's confession, which prompts him to reveal that he has been in love with her since their first meeting.[LN 9] Kodaka is voiced by Ryohei Kimura in the anime's Japanese dub, and by Jerry Jewell in the English dub.[2] For the live-action film, he is portrayed by Kōji Seto.[3]
  • Yozora Mikazuki (三日月 夜空 Mikazuki Yozora?) is a black-haired girl whose difficult personality drives away people. She often argues with Sena, and is physically abusive towards the other members of the Neighbor's Club,[ch. 12] especially Yukimura, whom she fools into working for the club as a crossdressing cosplay maid.[ch. 5][note 2] Ten years prior to the start of the series, she and Kodaka ("Taka") are childhood friends, but because she has short hair and wears a cap, Taka mistakes her for a boy and calls her "Sora".[ch. 28] The day before she moves, she plans to wear a skirt to reveal the fact that she is a girl, but becomes too embarrassed to meet him.[ch. 29] At the start of the series, she realizes Kodaka has transferred to her class. When she is irritated, she immerses herself as a model student who talks with her imaginary friend "Tomo-chan" until she is discovered by Kodaka.[LN 1][vol. 7:extra] She creates the Neighbor's Club in order to reform their friendship,[vol. 7:extra] although Kodaka does not realize this until later in the story when she cuts her hair.[ch. 28,29] In the anime, Yozora is voiced by Marina Inoue in the Japanese dub, and by Whitney Rodgers in the English dub.[2] In the live-action film, she is portrayed by Kie Kitano.[3]
  • Sena Kashiwazaki (柏崎 星奈 Kashiwazaki Sena?) is a blonde-haired schoolmate. The wealthy daughter of the school's headteacher, Sena shows a dislike of all things "ordinary". She is both attractive and academically successful, but her arrogance precludes her from having female friends, and she treats her male classmates as slaves.[LN 1][ch. 2][3] She enjoys playing video games,[LN 1][ch. 3][ch. 4] particularly galge (games where the main character tries to win over a girl) because they allow her to make female (if virtual) friends,[ch. 4] although some of the games have embarrassing adult content.[ch. 7][ch. 15] She does not get along with Yozora, who calls her "Meat" ( Niku?),[note 3][LN 1][ch. 3,9] Although she originally joins the Neighbor's Club to learn how to make friends, she develops feelings for Kodaka after he scolds her during the swimming pool lessons near the beginning of the story.[LN 8] When it is revealed that she is arranged to marry Kodaka by her father fourteen years ago,[LN 7] Sena confesses her feelings and proposes to Kodaka.[LN 8] In the anime, Sena is voiced by Kanae Itō in the Japanese dub, and by Jad Saxton in the English dub.[2] In the live-action film, she is portrayed by Mio Otani.[3]
  • Kobato Hasegawa (羽瀬川 小鳩 Hasegawa Kobato?) is a junior high student at St. Chronica's Academy. She is very close to her an-chan (older brother) Kodaka, and behaves in a jealous and clingy way whenever he does not give her attention. After having watched an anime show called Iron Necromancer, she cosplays as "Reisys V. Felicity Sumeragi", an ancient vampire,[LN 1][ch. 6] although Kodaka still treats her as a little sister by having her eat her vegetables and take a bath.[LN 1][ch. 6] She often speaks in an affected fashion, but when she gets emotionally worked up, she reverts to a strong Kyūshū accent.[volume & issue needed] She joins the Neighbor's Club to spend more time with Kodaka, and develops a rivalry with Maria, who is closest to her in age.[ch. 15] When the club visit her school's festival to watch her class film, it is revealed that she is quite popular in school, but has refused to make friends with her classmates despite their efforts to befriend her.[citation needed] In the anime, Kobato is voiced by Kana Hanazawa in the Japanese dub, and by Alison Viktorin in the English dub.[2] In the live-action film, she is portrayed by Sayu Kubota.[3]
  • Yukimura Kusunoki (楠 幸村 Kusunoki Yukimura?) is an effeminate schoolmate who is first introduced as Kodaka's stalker. A gullible student with low self-esteem, Yukimura believes Kodaka to be a romantic and masculine outlaw who lives life the way he wants to, and eagerly pledges to become his "underling" to become manlier.[LN 1][ch. 5] Despite claiming to be a boy,[ch. 15] Yukimura dresses in girls clothes, such as a French maid costume [ch. 8] or a bikini, as he takes to heart Yozora's flippant comments about masculinity and clothing.[ch. 15,25] Later in the story, Kodaka discovers that Yukimura is actually a girl, even to Yukimura's own surprise.[LN 5 ch 6-7] In the anime, Yukimura is voiced by Nozomi Yamamoto in the Japanese dub, and by Ashleigh Domangue in the English dub.[2] In the live-action film, Yukimura is portrayed by Sara Takatsuki, who has worked on live-action adaptations of Great Teacher Onizuka and Daily Lives of High School Boys.[3]
  • Rika Shiguma (志熊 理科 Shiguma Rika?) is a first-year genius-scientist student that the school gives her a special research room and excuses her from attending classes. She becomes attracted to Kodaka when he saves her during a disastrous lab experiment. Although she wears glasses and seems serious,[ch. 27] she is the most sexually forward club member, and converts any innocent thought into something perverted.[ch. 13,26] She enjoys reading BL (boys love) self-published magazines, and is especially aroused by stories that involve intercourse between mecha.[ch. 14] In the anime, Rika is voiced by Misato Fukuen in the Japanese dub, and by Alexis Tipton in the English dub.[2] For the live-action film, Rika is portrayed by Mao Kanjō.[3]
  • Maria Takayama (高山 マリア Takayama Maria?) is a ten-year-old nun and the club's staff advisor. She is very rude and immature, and often uses a variety of expletives when annoyed.[ch. 12] After Kodaka starts making her packed lunches, she becomes very affectionate with her new-found onii-chan (big brother), much to Kobato's annoyance.[ch. 15] She is easily manipulated by Yozora, who gets her to perform menial tasks by framing them as things adults would do.[volume & issue needed] Volume 8 of the light novels has a story where her teaching position is challenged.[LN 8] In the anime series, Maria is voiced by Yuka Iguchi in the Japanese dub, and by Kristi Kang in the English dub.[2] For the live-action film, Momoka Yamada portrays Maria.[3]

Supporting characters[edit]

  • Pegasus Kashiwazaki (柏崎 天馬 Kashiwazaki Pegasasu?) is Sena's father and the chairman of St. Chronica's. As a friend of Kodaka's father, he arranges for Kodaka and Kobato to attend the school.[LN 1] He is embarrassed by the unusual pronunciation of his first name, which would normally be "Tenma". He often badmouths Kodaka's father, but only because he truly values him as his best (and more or less only) friend.[ch. 23] He seems intent to betroth Sena to Kodaka, often saying that he considers Kodaka to be "a man I can entrust Sena to", after misunderstanding Sena's intentions to make Kobato her younger sister.[volume & issue needed] He is a wealthy man who wears traditional clothing,[ch. 23][importance?] and is quite weak to alcohol (drinking two glasses and becoming drunk within seconds).[ch. 24] In the anime series, he is voiced by Ryōtarō Okiayu in the Japanese dub, and by Brandon Potter in the English dub.[citation needed]
  • Stella Redfield (ステラ・レッドフィールド Sutera Reddofīrudo?) is the Kashiwazaki family butler[ch. 23] and Sena's older sister.[LN C] A blonde 22-year-old woman, she is a capable servant, though often surprisingly outspoken to her employer. She has a habit of making straight-faced jokes.[volume & issue needed] In the anime series, Stella is voiced by Ryōka Yuzuki in the Japanese dub, and by Caitlin Glass in the English dub.[episode needed]
  • Kate Takayama (高山 ケイト Takayama Keito?) is Maria's older sister who meets Kodaka and expresses her gratitude to him and the Neighbor's Club for taking care of Maria and keeping Maria's ego in check. She has a largely nonchalant attitude, and sometimes inappropriately belches or farts in public. Despite being relatively mature, she eventually calls Kodaka onii-chan (big brother) as well, since she is only 15 years old.[ch. 32] In the anime series, Kate is voiced by Emiri Katō in the Japanese dub, and by Brina Palencia in the English dub.[episode needed]
  • Aoi Yusa (遊佐 葵 Yusa Aoi?) is the student body treasurer at St. Chronica's. She is Sena's classmate and ranks second in the final year exam. She competes with Sena in her studies and is also envious of her popularity and other excellent attributes. She also attempted to disband the Neighbor's Club twice due to the club's lax performance and unmet requirements, but failed nonetheless after being faced with Yozora's and Sena's harsh scolding. She is first introduced in second anime series, and is voiced by Mariya Ise in the Japanese dub, and by Felecia Angelle in the English dub.[episode needed]
  • Hinata Hidaka (日高 日向 Hidaka Hinata?) is the student council president in the anime series, and Yozora's older sister. She is very popular in school and is a great athlete. She is voiced by Yōko Hikasa in the Japanese dub, and by Brittney Karbowski in the English dub.[episode needed]
  • Hayato Hasegawa (羽瀬川 隼人 Hasegawa Hayato?) is Kodaka and Kobato's father. He is a renowned archaeologist. He is voiced by Katsuyuki Konishi in the Japanese dub.
  • Saionji (西園寺?) is the cold-hearted student council president who is an exclusive character to the live-action film adaptation. He is portrayed by Louis Kurihara.[3]

Media[edit]

Light novels[edit]

The original light novel series, written by Yomi Hirasaka and illustrated by Buriki, began publication on Media Factory's MF Bunko J imprint from August 31, 2009. Nine volumes in the series have been published as of August 27, 2013,.[4] Hirasaka and Buriki also released the light novel Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Connect in December 2012.[5]

Two anthology volumes by several authors, Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Universe (僕は友達が少ない ゆにばーす?), were published on November 23, 2011,[6] and February 22, 2013.[7]

Manga[edit]

The first Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai manga series, written and illustrated by Itachi, has been published in Media Factory's Monthly Comic Alive magazine since its May 2010 issue, released on March 27, 2010.[8] Additionally, the series has been collected in ten tankōbon volumes, published between July 23, 2010, and March 22, 2014. Seven Seas Entertainment has licensed the first manga series in North America under the title Haganai: I Don't Have Many Friends. The first six volumes were published between November 13, 2012,[9] and March 4, 2014.[10]

A remade manga series, Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai+ (僕は友達が少ない+?), written by Misaki Harukawa and illustrated by Shouichi Taguchi, was published in Jump SQ.19,[11] from the December 2010 to the July 2012 issues. Plus introduces the characters in a different order and goes through different adventures. The series was collected in two volumes, which were published on October 4, 2011, and August 3, 2012.[12][13]

Three volumes of short stories, titled Boku wa Tomdachi ga Sukunai: Kōshiki Anthology Comic (僕は友達が少ない 公式アンソロジーコミック?), have been published by Media Factory since October 22, 2011.[14][15] Each chapter of them is written and illustrated by different authors.

The series of one-shot stories Haganai: I Don't Have Many Friends - Now With 50% More Fail! (僕は友達が少ない ショボーン! Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai: Shobōn!?) and Haganai: I Don't Have Many Friends - Club Minutes (僕は友達が少ない はがない日和 Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai: Haganai Biyori?) were serialized in Comic Alive in 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 respectively. Both series have been licensed for a release in English by Seven Seas Entertainment and their first volumes are scheduled for a July 1, 2014, and November 2014 releases respectively.[16]

Anime[edit]

In May 2011, an anime television series based on the light novels was announced on the wraparound jacket of the sixth light novel,[17] with an original video animation bundled with the seventh light novel released on September 22, 2011.[18] Produced by AIC Build under the direction of Hisashi Saitō, the series aired in Japan between October 7 and December 23, 2011.[19] The opening theme is "Zannenkei Rinjinbu Hoshi Futatsuhan" (残念系隣人部★★☆?, "The Regrettable Neighbours Club Two and a Half Stars") by Marina Inoue, Kanae Itō, Nozomi Yamamoto, Misato Fukuen, Kana Hanazawa, and Yuka Iguchi, while the ending theme is "Watashi no Ki-mo-chi" (私のキ・モ・チ?, "My Feelings") by Marina Inoue. The anime is based on the first three volumes and the beginning of volume four. The anime was licensed for streaming by Funimation, who hosted the stream on the website and Nico Nico,[20] before licensing the series for home video release.[21]

A follow-up original video animation episode was released on September 26, 2012.[22] The ending theme is "Kimi wa Tomodachi" (君は友達?, "You Are My Friend") by Inoue, Itō, Yamamoto, Fukuen, Hanazawa, Iguchi and Ryohei Kimura.[23]

A second season, titled Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai NEXT, aired from January 11 - March 29, 2013.[24] It is based on the novels from volume four until the end of volume eight. The series is directed by Toru Kitahata whilst Hirasaka is in charge of the scripts.[25][26][27] The opening and ending themes respectively are "Be My Friend" and "Bokura no Tsubasa" (僕らの翼?, "Our Wings"), both performed by Inoue, Itō, Yamamoto, Fukuen, Hanazawa and Iguchi.[28]

Game[edit]

A visual novel, Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Portable, was developed by Namco Bandai Games for the PlayStation Portable and released on February 23, 2012.[29]

Live-action film[edit]

On April 24, 2013, Ryukoku University posted a casting call for extras for a 2014 film adaptation of Haganai, to be distributed by Toei and produced by Times-In.[30] Hirasaka later confirmed the film's existence on May 2, 2013, stating that, whilst he initially didn't approve of the project, as he didn't feel the story was intended for live-action, he decided to approve it in light of a crisis in the light novel industry. Hirasaka will have a completely hands-off role in the film's production.[31][32] Takurō Oikawa, the film's director, chose not to watch the anime and told his cast members not to watch it either so that they can present a fresh interpretation of the light novels. The film was released on February 1, 2014.[3]

Reception[edit]

The second volume of the manga adaptation ranked seventh on the top 30 of Japanese Comic Ranking, for the week of May 23–29, 2011.[33]

Rebecca Silverman of Anime News Network found the first graphic novel “fairly entertaining” with artist Itachi’s illustrations “between beautiful depictions of the girls and messy sketches, which actually works well for the series”. While the premise “retreads familiar ground”, she noted the girls’ reactions in the dating sim chapter as the highlight of the volume.[34]

Tim Jones of THEM Anime Reviews gave the anime series three of five stars. He grouped the social misfits show as a “raunchy romp filled with lots of cheesecake and hit-or-miss comedy”, with “great leads, okay side characters”, and didn’t “need to be reminded every episode how huge Sena’s breasts are, thanks”.[1]

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network found the anime series interesting in that it starts with misfits finding friends and deferred the typical romantic comedy entanglements but was deflated that the series was “taking on harem baggage.”[35] The second half of series was "increasingly formulaic" and left him longing for a story. He found the episodes to have very little novelty: "Relationships change little, characters evolve not at all, and the message—that these outcasts have already found their friends and just refuse to acknowledge it—remains the same. We might as well be watching the first couple of episodes repeat ad infinitum."[36] Bamboo Dong found the series' strength to be in the character development, but its drawback was that such moments are far and few compared to the "recycled referential humor, like drawing the characters inside a video game, or drawing them inside a dating sim", and the same "bland paste of old jokes". She preferred the English dub as the characters insulting each other was better than the dull name-calling in the Japanese dub.[37]

Andy Hanley of UK Anime.net gave the anime series a 6/10, and called the anime a series of two halves, where the first half contained “great and hugely funny episodes” but the second half was “increasingly tired and even unlikeable” where “sure-fire comedy concepts such as a visit to karaoke or the swimming pool fail to do anything noteworthy with their subject material.” He found that the main characters undermined the series later on with “Yozora's snarky, bossy attitude which works so well in early episodes turns to bitchiness and then downright bullying” as Sena’s obsessions to “become something of a dead horse which the series insists upon flogging.”[38] He later gave the first graphic novel a 4/10. With Yozora and Sena as "massive bitches" more so than in the anime, he wrote that "a better title for the series might be It's Probably For The Best That You Have No Friends." He found the Seven Seas translation to be balanced and that its presentation was without complaint.[39]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The abbreviation "Haganai" is defined in the author's afterword in the first light novel.[LN 1]
  2. ^ Although Yozora abuses a lot of the Neighbor's Club members, she does not seem to bother Rika, as Rika takes whatever insult she gives her and deflects it back with a dirty joke that leaves her tired.
  3. ^ In the light novel, Yozora first calls Sena a cow due to her large breasts, but later nicknames her "Meat" ( Niku?) when they play a monster hunting video game that has raw and cooked meat as items. Sena reveals she does not mind the insulting nickname because it is the first time she had ever received one.[LN 1][ch. 9]

References[edit]

Light novels[edit]

Manga[edit]

Other[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Jones, Tim. "Haganai". THEM Anime Reviews. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Funimation Reveals Haganai TV Anime's Dub Cast, Trailer". Anime News Network. June 1, 2013. Retrieved June 1, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Nelkin, Sarah (2014-01-27). "Haganai Film Director: Never Saw Anime, Did Not Show it to Cast Members". Anime News Network. 
  4. ^ "僕は友達が少ない9 (MF文庫J)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved 2013-08-22. 
  5. ^ "僕は友達が少ない CONNECT (MF文庫J)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved 2013-06-21. 
  6. ^ "僕は友達が少ない ゆにばーす (MF文庫J)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved 2013-06-21. 
  7. ^ "僕は友達が少ない ゆにばーす2 (MF文庫J)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved 2013-06-21. 
  8. ^ "アライブ、「僕は友達が少ない」皮切りに続々コミカライズ" (in Japanese). Natalie.mu. March 28, 2010. Retrieved March 6, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Seven Seas Licenses Haganai, Mayo Chiki! Manga". Anime News Network. February 29, 2012. Retrieved September 28, 2012. 
  10. ^ "North American Anime, Manga Releases, March 2-8". Anime News Network. March 4, 2014. Retrieved March 6, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Second Manga at the series official website" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Retrieved June 2, 2011. [dead link]
  12. ^ "僕は友達が少ない+ 1 (ジャンプコミックス)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved June 1, 2013. 
  13. ^ "僕は友達が少ない+ 2 (ジャンプコミックス)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved June 1, 2013. 
  14. ^ "僕は友達が少ない 公式アンソロジーコミック  (MFコミックス アライブシリーズ)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved June 1, 2013. 
  15. ^ "僕は友達が少ない 公式アンソロジーコミック3 (アライブコミックス)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved June 1, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Seven Seas Adds 2 More Haganai Manga". Anime News Network. November 27, 2013. Retrieved December 16, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Light Novels Get TV Anime". Anime News Network. May 17, 2011. Retrieved August 11, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Novels Get Anime DVD". Anime News Network. June 25, 2011. Retrieved August 22, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai TV Anime Slated for Fall". Anime News Network. July 26, 2011. Retrieved August 11, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Funimation to Stream Haganai on Friday". Anime News Network. October 27, 2011. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
  21. ^ "Funimation Licenses Haganai School Comedy Anime". Anime News Network. January 28, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
  22. ^ "Haganai Gets New Original Video Anime on September 26". Anime News Network. May 6, 2012. Retrieved September 28, 2012. 
  23. ^ "Haganai Add On Disc Video Anime's Promo Streamed". Anime News Network. July 13, 2012. Retrieved September 9, 2012. 
  24. ^ "2nd Haganai Season Slated for January 10". Anime News Network. November 22, 2012. Retrieved May 31, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Twitter / haganai_anime: ここで重大発表!「僕は友達が少ない」TVアニメ第2期". Twitter.com. Retrieved 2012-09-28. 
  26. ^ "Haganai's 2nd Season Slated for January 2013". Anime News Network. August 18, 2012. Retrieved August 18, 2012. 
  27. ^ "2nd Haganai Season's Title, Staff Changes, Key Visual Revealed". Anime News Network. September 26, 2012. Retrieved September 28, 2012. 
  28. ^ "Haganai 2nd Season's Theme Songs Revealed". Anime News Network. November 9, 2012. Retrieved November 15, 2012. 
  29. ^ "Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai Release on 26th of January". Senpai Gamer. September 8, 2011. Retrieved September 20, 2011. 
  30. ^ "University Lists 'Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai' Film by Toei". Anime News Network. May 1, 2013. Retrieved May 31, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Haganai Creator Hirasaka Confirms Live-Action Film". Anime News Network. May 2, 2013. Retrieved May 31, 2013. 
  32. ^ Yegulalp, Serdar (May 22, 2013). "Suddenly, There's A Ton of 'Haganai' News". About.com. 
  33. ^ "Japanese Weekly Comic Ranking May 23–29 at Anime News Network". Anime News Network. June 1, 2011. Retrieved July 9, 2011. 
  34. ^ Silverman, Rebecca (November 28, 2012). "Review Haganai: I Don’t Have Many Friends GN1". Anime News Network. 
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