Boletus aereus

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Not to be confused with Boletus aureus. ‹See Tfd›
Boletus aereus
Bronze Roehrling.jpg
B. aereus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Boletales
Family: Boletaceae
Genus: Boletus
Species: B. aereus
Binomial name
Boletus aereus
Bull. (1789)
Boletus aereus
View the Mycomorphbox template that generates the following list
Mycological characteristics
pores on hymenium
cap is convex
hymenium is adnate
stipe is bare
spore print is olive-brown
ecology is mycorrhizal
edibility: choice

Boletus aereus is a bolete, an edible mushroom frequently consumed in the Basque Country, Navarre, France and Italy. It is commonly known as ontto beltza in Basque, porcino nero in Italian, and tête de nègre (negro’s head) in French. As a member of the Boletaceae family, this mushroom has tubes and pores, instead of gills beneath its cap.

Taxonomy[edit]

This species is classified in Boletus section Boletus, alongside its close relatives which include Boletus edulis and Boletus pinophilus.[1] In 2008, a taxonomic revision of western North American populations initially thought to represent Boletus aereus, formally established them as a separate species, Boletus regineus.[2]

Description[edit]

In woodland, Italy

The height of this boletus is 15–25 cm, broad at maturity; specimens of 40 cm have been found in some cases. The cap is dark brown and the ringless stalk is 6–15 cm high, usually shorter than the cap diameter. The pores are greyish white when young, then become yellow.[3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Boletus aereus is found mainly in central and southern Europe, being rare in colder climes such as England. Mushrooms are found in summer and autumn.[3]

Edibility[edit]

It is well known in southern Europe for its culinary qualities, and is appreciated by some even above Boletus edulis.[3] The similar Boletus regineus (the Queen bolete) is widely collected by both amateur and commercial collectors in California.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beugelsdijk DCM, van der Linde S, Zuccarello GC, and others. 2008. A phylogenetic study of Boletus section Boletus in Europe. Persoonia 20: 1–7.
  2. ^ Arora D. (2008). "California porcini: three new taxa, observations on their harvest, and the tragedy of no commons". Economic Botany 62(3): 356–375.
  3. ^ a b c Carluccio A. (2003). The Complete Mushroom Book. Quadrille. ISBN 1-84400-040-0.