Bolivia national football team

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Bolivia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) La Verde (The Green One)[1]
Association Bolivian Football Federation
Confederation CONMEBOL (South America)
Head coach Xabier Azkargorta[2]
Captain Ronald Raldes
Vice-captain Vacant
Most caps Luis Cristaldo (93)
Marco Sandy (93)[3]
Top scorer Joaquín Botero (20)[4]
Home stadium Estadio Hernando Siles
FIFA code BOL
FIFA ranking 71 Steady (14 August 2014)
Highest FIFA ranking 18 (July 1997[5])
Lowest FIFA ranking 115 (October 2011[6])
Elo ranking 55
Highest Elo ranking 22 (June 1997[7])
Lowest Elo ranking 86 (July 1989[8])
First colours
Second colours
First international
 Chile 7–1 Bolivia Bolivia
(Santiago, Chile; October 12, 1926)
Biggest win
 Bolivia 7–0 Venezuela 
(La Paz, Bolivia; August 22, 1993)
 Bolivia 9–2 Haiti 
(La Paz, Bolivia; March 3, 2000)
Biggest defeat
 Uruguay 9–0 Bolivia Bolivia
(Lima, Peru; November 6, 1927)
 Brazil 10–1 Bolivia Bolivia
(São Paulo, Brazil; April 10, 1949)
World Cup
Appearances 3 (First in 1930)
Best result Group stage, 1930, 1950, 1994
Copa América
Appearances 24 (First in 1926)
Best result Champions, 1963
Confederations Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 1999)
Best result Group Stage, 1999
Website www.fbf.com.bo/web/

The Bolivia national football team has represented Bolivia in international football since 1926. Organized by the Bolivian Football Federation (FBF)[A] it is one of the 10 members of FIFA's South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL).

After playing in the 1930 and 1950 World Cups, they qualified just once—in 1994. There, playing champions Germany in the tournament's opening game in Chicago, Bolivia lost 1-0 as Marco Etcheverry, considered the nation's best player of the 1990s, got sent off just three minutes after coming on as a substitute. They have never advanced past the first round of any World Cup, and have only scored one goal, in 1994. However, they did win the Copa América at home in 1963, and finished at runner-ups in the following tournament as hosts in 1997.

History[edit]

Bolivia debuted in international football in 1926, one year after the foundation of the Bolivian Football Federation. As participants of the 1926 South American Championship in Chile, Bolivia scored first against the hosts with Téofilo Aguilar, but wound up defeated by the Chileans 7–1. Bolivia also lost the following three games, 0-5 against Argentina, 1-6 against Paraguay and 0-6 against Uruguay.[9]

In 1930, Bolivia was one of the teams invited to the inaugural edition of the FIFA World Cup, held in Uruguay. Drawn in Group 2 of the 1930 FIFA World Cup, Bolivia lost both its games 4-0, first to Yugoslavia at the Estadio Parque Central, and then to Brazil in the Estadio Centenario.[10] They returned in the 1950 FIFA World Cup, where Argentina's withdrawal from the qualifiers lead Bolivia to an automatic berth. With three teams declining to play in Brazil, Bolivia was put in a group of two along with Uruguay. The Bolivians' only game was an 8-0 defeat to Uruguay at the Estádio Independência in Belo Horizonte.[11]

Bolivia's greatest football achievement was the 1963 South American Championship title, which they hosted and had the advantage of being better used to the higher altitudes.[12] Afterwards, the country only started to resurge in an international level with the creation of the Academia Tahuichi Aguilera in Santa Cruz de la Sierra in 1978, a football school that revealed players such as Marco Etcheverry, Erwin Sánchez and Luis Cristaldo. Under Spanish coach Xabier Azkargorta and featuring nine players from Tahuichi, Bolivia became the first team to beat Brazil in the South American qualifiers while playing them in La Paz, and qualified for the 1994 FIFA World Cup finishing second in Group B of the CONMEBOL qualifiers behind the Brazilians themselves.[13] Bolivia was drawn into the tournament's Group C, and got selected as the adversary of defending champions Germany in the tournament's opening match. Bolivia lost in Chicago's Soldier Field 1-0 following a screw-up by goalkeeper Carlos Trucco, while also earning the fastest red card in World Cup history as Etcheverry got sent off just three minutes after entering the game. Following a 0-0 draw with South Korea at Foxboro Stadium, Bolivia returned to Chicago and lost 3-1 to Spain, with Sánchez scoring the first ever Bolivian goal in the World Cup.[14] Following that Bolivia again hosted the South American Championship, now known as Copa América, in 1997. Again the team reached the finals, only for this time to finish as runner-ups to Brazil.[15]

Jersey history[edit]

Bolivia's first uniforms were all white. In the 1930 FIFA World Cup, the Bolivians painted before the starting match with Yugoslavia one of the letters in "Viva Uruguay" in each of the eleven starters' jerseys to please the local crowd. In the following game with Brazil, given the adversary also wore white Bolivia instead borrowed Uruguay's own blue uniform to play. The Bolivians again painted a message to the hosts in the 1945 South American Championship, with the players' jerseys reading "Viva Chile". In 1946, Bolivia they changed their jersey colors to black and white stripes, like the colors of the Cochabamba region. FBF reverted back to white the following year. In 1957, FBF decided to use one of the colors in the Flag of Bolivia. Given red and yellow were used by many of the other South Americans, green became the primary color, leading to the nickname "La Verde" ("The Green One").[16]

Stadium[edit]

Bolivia play their home games at Estadio Hernando Siles, which has an altitude of 3,637 metres (11,932 ft) above sea level, making it one of the highest football stadiums in the world. Many visiting teams protest that the altitude gives Bolivia an unfair advantage against opponents. On May 27, 2007, FIFA declared that no World Cup Qualifying matches could be played in stadiums above 8,200 feet (2,500 m) above sea level. However FIFA raised the altitude limit after months of campaigning against the ban, thus allowing the stadium to continue holding World Cup qualifying matches.

Competitive Record[edit]

FIFA World Cup Record[edit]

FIFA World Cup record
Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1930 Group stage 12th 2 0 0 2 0 8
1934 to 1938 Did not enter
1950 Group stage 13th 1 0 0 1 0 8
1954 Entry not accepted[17]
1958 to 1990 Did not qualify
1994 Group stage 21st 3 0 1 2 1 4
1998 to 2014 Did not qualify
Total Group stage 3/20 6 0 1 5 1 20
FIFA World Cup History
Year Round Score Result
1930 Round 1  Bolivia 0 – 4 Kingdom of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia Loss
Round 1  Bolivia 0 – 4  Brazil Loss
1950 Round 1  Bolivia 0 – 8  Uruguay Loss
1994 Round 1  Bolivia 0 – 1  Germany Loss
Round 1  Bolivia 0 – 0  South Korea Draw
Round 1  Bolivia 1 – 3  Spain Loss

FIFA Confederations Cup Record[edit]

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Squad
Saudi Arabia 1992 Did Not Qualify
Saudi Arabia 1995
Saudi Arabia 1997
Mexico 1999 Group Stage 6th 3 0 2 1 2 3 Squad
South Korea/Japan 2001 Did Not Qualify
France 2003
Germany 2005
South Africa 2009
Brazil 2013
Russia 2017 To Be Determined
Qatar 2021
Total Group Stage 1/9 3 0 2 1 2 3 -
FIFA Confederations Cup History
Year Round Score Result
1999 Round 1  Bolivia 2 – 2  Egypt Draw
Round 1  Bolivia 0 – 0  Saudi Arabia Draw
Round 1  Bolivia 0 – 1  Mexico Loss

Copa América Record[edit]

Copa América/South American Championship
Total: 1 Title
Year Position Year Position Year Position
1916 No Participation 1941 Withdrew 1975 Round 1
1917 No Participation 1942 Withdrew 1979 Round 1
1919 No Participation 1945 Sixth Place 1983 Round 1
1920 No Participation 1946 Sixth Place 1987 Round 1
1921 No Participation 1947 Seventh Place 1989 Round 1
1922 No Participation 1949 Fourth Place 1991 Round 1
1923 No Participation 1953 Sixth Place 1993 Round 1
1924 No Participation 1955 Withdrew 1995 Quarter-finals
1925 No Participation 1956 Withdrew 1997 Runners-up
1926 Fifth Place 1957 Withdrew 1999 Round 1
1927 Fourth Place 1959 Seventh Place 2001 Round 1
1929 Withdrew 1959 Withdrew 2004 Round 1
1935 Withdrew 1963 Champions 2007 Round 1
1937 Withdrew 1967 Sixth Place 2011 Round 1
1939 Withdrew

Pan American Games record[edit]

Records[edit]

Most capped players[edit]

As of June 6, 2014, the ten players with the most caps for Bolivia are:

# Name Career Caps Goals
1. Luis Héctor Cristaldo 1989–2005 93 5
= Marco Antonio Sandy 1993–2003 93 6
3. José Milton Melgar 1980–1997 89 6
4. Carlos Fernando Borja 1979–1997 88 1
5. Julio César Baldivieso 1991–2005 85 15
= Juan Manuel Peña 1991–2009 85 1
7. Miguel Ángel Rimba 1989–2000 80 0
8. Óscar Sánchez 1994–2006 78 6
9. Ronald Raldes 2001- 77 0
10. Jaime Moreno 1993–2008 75 9

Top goalscorers[edit]

Players in bold are still active at international level. As of June 6, 2014, the ten players with the most goals for Bolivia are:

# Name Career Goals
1. Joaquín Botero 1999–2009 20
2. Víctor Agustín Ugarte 1947–1963 16
3. Carlos Aragonés 1977–1981 15
= Julio César Baldivieso 1991–2005 15
= Erwin Sánchez 1989–2005 15
6. Máximo Alcócer 1953–1963 13
= Marco Antonio Etcheverry 1989–2003 13
8. Marcelo Martins 2007- 12
9. William Ramallo 1989–1997 11
10. Miguel Aguilar 1977–1983 10

2014 FIFA World Cup Qualification Standings[edit]

Team
Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Argentina 16 9 5 2 35 15 +20 32
 Colombia 16 9 3 4 27 13 +14 30
 Chile 16 9 1 6 29 25 +4 28
 Ecuador 16 7 4 5 20 16 +4 25
 Uruguay 16 7 4 5 25 25 0 25
 Venezuela 16 5 5 6 14 20 −6 20
 Peru 16 4 3 9 17 26 −9 15
 Bolivia 16 2 6 8 17 30 −13 12
 Paraguay 16 3 3 10 17 31 −14 12
  Argentina Bolivia Chile Colombia Ecuador Paraguay Peru Uruguay Venezuela
Argentina  1–1 4–1 0–0 4–0 3–1 3–1 3–0 3–0
Bolivia  1–1 0–2 1–2 1–1 3–1 1–1 4–1 1–1
Chile  1–2 3–1 1–3 2–1 2–0 4–2 2–0 3–0
Colombia  1–2 5–0 3–3 1–0 2–0 2–0 4–0 1–1
Ecuador  1–1 1–0 3–1 1–0 4–1 2–0 1–0 2–0
Paraguay  2–5 4–0 1–2 1–2 2–1 1–0 1–1 0–2
Peru  1–1 1–1 1–0 0–1 1–0 2–0 1–2 2–1
Uruguay  3–2 4–2 4–0 2–0 1–1 1–1 4–2 1–1
Venezuela  1–0 1–0 0–2 1–0 1–1 1–1 3–2 0–1

Recent Games[edit]

Match results and fixtures[edit]

Official matches from the last 12 months as well as any future scheduled matches.

Current squad[edit]

The following 20 players were named for the friendly matches against Ecuador on September 4, and Mexico on September 9, 2014.
Caps and goals updated as June 6, 2014.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Daniel Vaca (1978-11-03) 3 November 1978 (age 35) 8 0 Bolivia The Strongest
1GK Romel Quiñoñez (1992-06-25) 25 June 1992 (age 22) 4 0 Bolivia Bolívar
2DF Ronald Raldes (Captain) (1980-04-20) 20 April 1980 (age 34) 77 0 Bolivia Oriente Petrolero
2DF Luis Alberto Gutiérrez (1985-01-15) January 15, 1985 (age 29) 40 0 Bolivia Bolívar
2DF Marvin Bejarano (1987-06-16) 16 June 1987 (age 27) 17 0 Bolivia Oriente Petrolero
2DF Ronald Eguino (1988-02-20) 20 February 1988 (age 26) 5 0 Bolivia Bolívar
2DF Leandro Maygua (1992-09-12) 12 September 1992 (age 21) 2 0 Bolivia Bolívar
2DF Alan Loras (1986-07-04) 4 July 1986 (age 28) 0 0 Bolivia Universitario de Sucre
3MF José Luis Chávez (1986-05-18) May 18, 1986 (age 28) 21 1 Bolivia Bolívar
3MF Alejandro Chumacero (1991-04-22) 22 April 1991 (age 23) 18 1 Bolivia The Strongest
3MF Pedro Azogue (1994-12-06) 6 December 1994 (age 19) 7 0 Bolivia Oriente Petrolero
3MF Danny Bejarano (1994-01-03) 3 January 1994 (age 20) 7 0 Bolivia Oriente Petrolero
3MF Alejandro Meleán (1987-06-16) 16 June 1987 (age 27) 5 0 Bolivia Oriente Petrolero
3MF Daniel Chávez (1990-01-13) 13 January 1990 (age 24) 2 0 Bolivia The Strongest
3MF Raúl Castro (1989-08-19) 19 August 1989 (age 25) 0 0 Bolivia The Strongest
3MF Mario Ovando (1985-11-09) 9 November 1985 (age 28) 0 0 Bolivia San José
4FW Juan Carlos Arce (1985-04-10) 10 April 1985 (age 29) 42 5 Bolivia Bolívar
4FW Carlos Saucedo (1979-09-11) 11 September 1979 (age 34) 8 5 Costa Rica Saprissa
4FW Ramiro Ballivián (1992-04-08) 8 April 1992 (age 22) 0 0 Bolivia Universitario de Sucre
4FW Rodrigo Ramallo (1990-10-14) 14 October 1990 (age 23) 0 0 Bolivia Jorge Wilstermann

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have been called up during the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Sergio Galarza (1975-08-25) 25 August 1975 (age 38) 28 0 Bolivia Sport Boys v.  Peru, October 15, 2013
DF Edward Zenteno (1984-12-05) 5 December 1984 (age 29) 13 0 Bolivia Jorge Wilstermann v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
DF Diego Bejarano (1994-01-03) 3 January 1994 (age 20) 8 1 Greece Panetolikos v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
DF Edemir Rodríguez (1984-10-21) 21 October 1984 (age 29) 13 0 Bolivia Bolívar v.  Peru, October 15, 2013
DF Abraham Cabrera (1991-02-20) 20 February 1991 (age 23) 3 0 Bolivia The Strongest v.  Peru, October 15, 2013
DF Carlos Mendoza (1992-10-19) 19 October 1992 (age 21) 0 0 Bolivia Sport Boys v.  Peru, October 15, 2013
DF Ronny Jiménez (1989-04-12) 12 April 1989 (age 25) 5 0 Bolivia The Strongest v.  Ecuador, September 10, 2013
MF Rudy Cardozo (1990-02-14) 14 February 1990 (age 24) 30 4 Bolivia Bolívar v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
MF Gualberto Mojica (1984-10-07) 7 October 1984 (age 29) 27 3 Saudi Arabia Najran v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
MF Wálter Veizaga (1987-07-24) 24 July 1987 (age 27) 10 0 Bolivia The Strongest v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
MF Jaime Arrascaita (1993-09-02) 2 September 1993 (age 20) 4 1 Bolivia Bolívar v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
MF Damir Miranda (1985-10-16) 16 October 1985 (age 28) 2 0 Bolivia Bolívar v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
MF Vicente Arze (1985-22-11) 11 October 1985 (age 28) 1 0 Ukraine Hoverla Uzhhorod v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
MF Edivaldo Hermoza (1985-11-17) 17 November 1985 (age 28) 11 1 Portugal Moreirense v.  Peru, October 15, 2013
MF Miguel Ríos (1988-02-08) 8 February 1988 (age 26) 0 0 Bolivia Guabirá v.  Peru, October 15, 2013
FW Marcelo Martins Moreno (1987-06-18) 18 June 1987 (age 27) 48 12 Brazil Cruzeiro v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
FW Alcides Peña (1989-01-14) 14 January 1989 (age 25) 15 1 Bolivia Oriente Petrolero v.  Greece, June 6, 2014
FW Henry Justiniano (1994-11-19) 19 November 1994 (age 19) 0 0 Bolivia Guabirá v.  Peru, October 15, 2013

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The acronym FBF comes from the organization's Spanish name, Federación Boliviana de Fútbol.
  2. ^ Peru v Bolivia was played without spectators due to sanctions imposed by FIFA as a result of crowd disturbance incidents.[18] The Peruvian Football Federation decided to withdraw their appeal and accepted the punishment.[19]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
1959 - UruguayUruguay
South American Champions
1963 (First title)
Succeeded by
1967 - UruguayUruguay