Bon viveur

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"Bon Vivant" redirects here. For other uses, see 1971 Bon Vivant botulism case.

The phrase bon viveur is a pseudo-French phrase adopted in English in the mid 19th century, modelled on the French bon vivant "one who lives well", i.e. referring to a person who enjoys the good things of life.

The phrase is not derogatory but conveys a sense of overindulgence.[1] In his book, Mind the Gaffe, professor Larry Trask advised that the phrase is pretentious.[2]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ David Francis Pocock, Jeremy MacClancy (1998), Understanding social anthropology, p. 210 
  2. ^ R.L. Trask (2003), Mind the Gaffe: the Penguin Guide to Common Errors in English 

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