Bonanza, Oregon

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Bonanza, Oregon
City
The Living Springs Fellowship Church in Bonanza
The Living Springs Fellowship Church in Bonanza
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 42°11′58″N 121°24′17″W / 42.19944°N 121.40472°W / 42.19944; -121.40472Coordinates: 42°11′58″N 121°24′17″W / 42.19944°N 121.40472°W / 42.19944; -121.40472
Country United States
State Oregon
County Klamath
Incorporated 1901
Government
 • Mayor Betty Tyree[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.82 sq mi (2.12 km2)
 • Land 0.82 sq mi (2.12 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 4,127 ft (1,258 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 415
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 411
 • Density 506.1/sq mi (195.4/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP code 97623
Area code(s) 541
FIPS code 41-07300[3]
GNIS feature ID 1117918[5]

Bonanza is a city in Klamath County, Oregon, United States near Klamath Falls. The population was 415 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Bonanza is at an elevation of 4,127 feet (1,258 m)[5] in southern Klamath County near the Oregon–California border.[6] The city is at the east end of Oregon Route 70, a spur off Oregon Route 140. By highway, Bonanza is about 21 miles (34 km) from Klamath Falls and 300 miles (483 km) from Portland.[7]

The Lost River flows through Bonanza.[6] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.82 square miles (2.12 km2), all of it land.[2]

Climate[edit]

This region experiences warm (but not hot) and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Bonanza has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.[8]

History[edit]

The city, in a farming district, was named after the Spanish word for prosperity, apparently because of the good springs found nearby. The Bonanza post office was established in 1875.[9]

J. P. Roberts founded the community in 1876 and opened a store there. Bonanza was formally platted in 1878. By around 1900, it was considered the third most important city in Klamath County, after Klamath Falls and Merrill. Daily mail arrived by stagecoach. The chief products of the region were cattle, horses, grain, hay, fruits, and vegetables.[10]

Bonanza is an agricultural community with large areas of alfalfa, cattle, and dairy farm use. The Lost River runs near downtown where the Bonanza Big Springs are located. Low water levels have caused groundwater contamination through the springs and added to the regional controversies over water use, endangered suckers (fish) and struggling salmon species, and farming.[11][12]

Education and economy[edit]

The community is home to Bonanza Schools,[13] which include all grades from kindergarten through 12.[14] As of 2003, the four largest employers in Bonanza were the Klamath County School District, Bonanza View Dairy, Tom DeJong Dairy, and Haskins Potato.[7]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 100
1900 118
1910 250 111.9%
1920 77 −69.2%
1930 141 83.1%
1940 233 65.2%
1950 259 11.2%
1960 297 14.7%
1970 230 −22.6%
1980 270 17.4%
1990 323 19.6%
2000 415 28.5%
2010 415 0.0%
source:[3][15]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010, there were 415 people, 152 households, and 108 families residing in the town. The population density was 506.1 inhabitants per square mile (195.4 /km2). There were 169 housing units at an average density of 206.1 per square mile (79.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 86.3% White, 0.2% African American, 0.5% Native American, 9.6% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 27.7% of the population.[3]

There were 152 households of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 28.9% were non-families. 23.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.25.[3]

The median age in the town was 34.5 years. 30.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.3% were from 25 to 44; 21.9% were from 45 to 64; and 14.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 51.6% male and 48.4% female.[3]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 415 people, 139 households, and 102 families residing in the city. The population density was 497.8 people per square mile (193.1/km²). There were 152 housing units at an average density of 182.3 per square mile (70.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.54% White, 0.48% African American, 0.96% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.72% Pacific Islander, 5.54% from other races, and 6.51% from two or more races. About 13 percent of the population were Latino of any race.[3]

There were 139 households out of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.0% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 25.9% were non-families, 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.40.[3]

The age distribution was 34.9% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.9 males.[3]

The median income for a household in the city was $31,944, and the median income for a family was $36,786. Males had a median income of $21,979 versus $18,750 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,213. About 14.7% of families and 16.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.9% of those under age 18 and 11.9% of those age 65 or over.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Incorporated Cities: Bonanza". Oregon Blue Book. Oregon Secretary of State. 2013. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Gazetteer: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 22, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "American FactFinder". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved August 22, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 2, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Bonanza". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. November 28, 1980. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b The 2013 Road Atlas. Chicago, Illinois: Rand McNally. pp. 84, 85. ISBN 978-052-80062-2-7. 
  7. ^ a b "Bonanza Community Profile". Infrastructure Finance Authority. 2009. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
  8. ^ Climate Summary for Bonanza, Oregon
  9. ^ McArthur, Lewis A.; Lewis L. McArthur (2003) [1928]. Oregon Geographic Names (7th ed.). Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society Press. p. 97. ISBN 0-87595-277-1. 
  10. ^ Shaver, F. A., et al. (1905). An Illustrated History of Central Oregon Embracing Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler, Crook, Lake and Klamath Counties. Spokane, Washington: Western Publishing Co. p. 981. OCLC 5436491. 
  11. ^ NASA Earth Observatory (September 8, 2001). "Drought in the Klamath River Basin". National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
  12. ^ St. Clair, Jeffrey (October 15, 2001). "Klamath Water Babies". In These Times. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Bonanza Schools". Klamath County School District. 2009. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Bonanza Schools: Home of the Antlers" (PDF). Klamath County School District. 2013–14. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  15. ^ Moffatt, Riley Moore (1996). Population History of Western U.S. Cities and Towns, 1850–1990. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 207. ISBN 978-0-8108-3033-2. 

External links[edit]