Bonn Agreement (Afghanistan)

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The Bonn Agreement (officially the Agreement on Provisional Arrangements in Afghanistan Pending the Re-Establishment of Permanent Government Institutions) was the initial series of agreements intended to re-create the State of Afghanistan following the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in response to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Since no nationally-agreed-upon government had existed in Afghanistan since 1979, it was felt necessary to have a transition period before a permanent government was established. A nationally-agreed-upon government would require at least one loya jirga to be convened; however, in the absence of law and order in the wake of the rapid victory of American and Afghan Northern Alliance forces, immediate steps were felt to be required.

Overview[edit]

In December 2001, 25 prominent Afghans met under UN auspices in Bonn, Germany, to decide on a plan for governing the country (see list of signatories at International Conference on Afghanistan, Bonn (2001)). As a result, the Afghan Interim Authority (AIA) - made up of 30 members, headed by a chairman - was inaugurated on 22 December 2001 with a six-month mandate to be followed by a two-year Transitional Authority (TA), after which elections are to be held.

One of the sections of the Bonn Agreement[1] envisaged the establishment of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF).[2] Resolution 1386 of the United Nations Security Council subsequently established ISAF.

Constitution of Afghanistan[edit]

Under the Bonn Agreement the Afghan Constitution Commission was established to draft a new constitution in consultation with the public. The Bonn Agreement called for a loya jirga to be convened within 18 months of the establishment of the Transitional Authority and for the use of the 1964 constitution as the basis for a new constitution. The constitution had been adopted by the loya Jirga on January 4, 2004.

Legal system[edit]

The Bonn Agreement calls for a judicial commission to rebuild the justice system in accordance with Islamic principles, international standards, the rule of law, and Afghan legal traditions.

Judicial branch[edit]

The Bonn Agreement called for the establishment of a Supreme Court of Afghanistan.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ United Nations Security Council Document 1154. Annex I - International Security Force S/2001/1154 page 9. {{{date}}}. (2001) Retrieved 2008-08-26.
  2. ^ United Nations Security Council Resolution 1386. S/RES/1386(2001) 20 December 2001. Retrieved 2007-09-21. - (UNSCR 1386)

External links[edit]