Bontoc language

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bontoc
Finallig
Region Philippines, Mountain Province
Native speakers
ca. 40,000  (2007)[1]
Austronesian
Language codes
ISO 639-3 bncinclusive code
Individual codes:
lbk – Central Bontok
ebk – Eastern Bontok
rbk – Northern Bontok
obk – Southern Bontok
vbk – Southwestern Bontok
{{{mapalt}}}
Area where Bontoc is spoken according to Ethnologue

Bontoc (Bontok) /bɒnˈtɒk/[2] (also called Finallig) is the native language of the indigenous Bontoc people of the Mountain Province, in the northern part of the Philippines.

Phonology[edit]

Consonant phonemes[3]
Labial Alveolar Palatal Velar Glottal
Nasal m n ŋ
Plosive p b t d k ɡ ʔ
Fricative s
Rhotic ɻ~ɺ
Approximant j



The archiphoneme /r/ has [l], [ɻ], and [ɺ] as its allophones.[3] The allophone [l] occurs word-initially, adjacent to /i/, as the second member of a consonant cluster consisting of a coronal consonant and /r/, and as the second member of any consonant cluster preceded by /i/. [ɻ] occurs in free variation with [l] word-initially, but otherwise occurs in complementary distribution with it. [ɺ] occurs in free variation with [l] and [ɻ] word-initially, and with [ɻ] elsewhere.
The plosives /t/, /ɡ/, /b/, and /d/ have, respectively, [] (representing an interdental consonant), [], [f], and [t͡s] as their syllable-initial allophones.[3]
The voiced stop /b/ also has [] and [v] as its allophones.[3] Both of these allophones occur as the first member of a geminate cluster. They are in free variation.
The approximant /j/ has one allophone: [ɥ]. [ɥ] occurs after /o/.[3]

Vowel phonemes[3]
Front Back
High i
Mid e o
Close a

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bontoc at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Central Bontok at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Eastern Bontok at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Northern Bontok at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Southern Bontok at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Southwestern Bontok at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  2. ^ Laurie Bauer, 2007, The Linguistics Student’s Handbook, Edinburgh
  3. ^ a b c d e f Lawrence A. Reid, "The phonology of Central Bontoc", The Journal of the Polynesian Society, 1963

External links[edit]