Boone County, Missouri

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Boone County, Missouri
CourthouseCoMo.jpg
The Boone County Courthouse at the Boone County Government Complex
Seal of Boone County, Missouri
Seal
Map of Missouri highlighting Boone County
Location in the state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
Founded November 16, 1820
Named for Daniel Boone
Seat Columbia
Largest city Columbia
Area
 • Total 691 sq mi (1,790 km2)
 • Land 685 sq mi (1,774 km2)
 • Water 5.6 sq mi (15 km2), 0.8%
Population (Est.)
 • (2013) 170,773
 • Density 237/sq mi (92/km²)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.showmeboone.com

Boone County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 162,642[1] making it the eighth-most populous county in the state. Its county seat is Columbia,[2] the fifth-largest city in Missouri. The county was organized November 16, 1820 and named for Daniel Boone.[3]

Boone County comprises the Columbia, MO Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The University of Missouri is located in Columbia.

History[edit]

Boone County was organized November 16, 1820, from a portion of the territorial Howard County. The area was then known as Boone's Lick Country, because of a salt lick which Daniel Boone's sons used for their stock.

Boone County was settled primarily from the Upper South states of Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The settlers brought slaves and slave-holding with them, and quickly started cultivating crops similar to those in Middle Tennessee and Kentucky: hemp and tobacco. Boone was one of several counties settled by Southerners to the north and south of the Missouri River. Because of its culture and traditions, the area became known as Little Dixie, and Boone County was at its heart.[4] In 1860 slaves made up 25 percent or more of the county's population, and Little Dixie was strongly pro-Confederate during the American Civil War.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 496 square miles (1,280 km2), of which 685 square miles (1,770 km2) is land and 5.6 square miles (15 km2) (0.8%) is water.[6] The Missouri River makes up the southern border of the county.

National protected area[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 8,859
1840 13,561 53.1%
1850 14,979 10.5%
1860 19,486 30.1%
1870 20,765 6.6%
1880 25,422 22.4%
1890 26,043 2.4%
1900 28,642 10.0%
1910 30,533 6.6%
1920 29,672 −2.8%
1930 30,995 4.5%
1940 34,991 12.9%
1950 48,432 38.4%
1960 55,202 14.0%
1970 80,911 46.6%
1980 100,376 24.1%
1990 112,379 12.0%
2000 135,454 20.5%
2010 162,642 20.1%
Est. 2013 170,773 5.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 135,454 people, 53,094 households, and 31,378 families residing in the county. The population density was 198 people per square mile (76/km²). There were 56,678 housing units at an average density of 83 per square mile (32/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 85.43% White, 8.54% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 2.96% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.69% from other races, and 1.93% from two or more races. Approximately 1.78% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.6% claimed German, 12.3% American, 11.2% English and 9.8% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 53,094 households out of which 30.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.50% were married couples living together, 10.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.90% were non-families. 28.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county the population was spread out with 22.80% under the age of 18, 19.90% from 18 to 24, 29.90% from 25 to 44, 18.80% from 45 to 64, and 8.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 93.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,485, and the median income for a family was $51,210. Males had a median income of $33,304 versus $25,990 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,844. About 7.60% of families and 14.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.10% of those under age 18 and 5.90% of those age 65 or over.

There are 121,319 registered voters.[12]

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

  • Centralia R-VI School DistrictCentralia
    • Chance Elementary School (PK-02)
    • Centralia Intermediate School (03-05)
    • Chester Boren Middle School (06-08)
    • Centralia High School (09-12)
  • Columbia School District No. 93Columbia
    • Center for Gifted Education (01-05)
    • Cedar Ridge Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Thomas Benton Elementary School (PK-05)
    • John Ridgeway Elementary School (K-05)
    • Eugene Field/Hart Lewis Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Midway Heights Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Ulysses S. Grant Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Two Mile Prairie Elementary School (PK-05)
    • New Haven Elementary School (PK-05)
    • West Boulevard Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Robert E. Lee Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Parkade Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Blue Ridge Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Fairview Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Russell Boulevard Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Shepard Boulevard Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Mary Paxton Keeley Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Derby Ridge Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Mill Creek Elementary School (PK-05)
    • John B. Lange Middle School (06-08)
    • Ann Hawkins Gentry Middle School (06-08)
    • Smithton Middle School (06-08)
    • Oakland Middle School (06-08)
    • Jefferson Middle School (06-08)
    • West Middle School (08-09)
    • Muriel Battle High School (09-12)
    • Frederick Douglass High School (09-12) – Alternative School
    • Rock Bridge High School (09-12)
    • David H. Hickman High School (09-12)

Private schools[edit]

  • Morningside Community School – Columbia (05-07) – Nonsectarian

Post secondary[edit]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

The Democratic Party predominantly controls politics at the local level in Boone County. Democrats currently hold all of the elected positions in the county.

Boone County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Tom Schauwecker Democratic
Circuit Clerk Christy Blakemore Democratic
County Clerk Wendy S. Noren Democratic
Collector Patricia S. Lensmeyer Democratic
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Dan Atwill Democratic
Commissioner
(District 1)
Karen M. Miller Democratic
Commissioner
(District 2)
Janet Thompson Democratic
Prosecuting Attorney Dan Knight Democratic
Public Administrator Cathy D. Richards Democratic
Recorder Bettie Johnson Democratic
Sheriff Robert Dwayne Carey Democratic
Treasurer Nicole Galloway Democratic

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2008 42.71% 35,785 55.28% 46,315 2.01% 1,688
2004 47.33% 35,666 51.08% 38,489 1.59% 1,201
2000 43.13% 25,609 52.22% 31,007 4.65% 2,767
1996 30.51% 15,929 65.62% 34,266 3.87% 2,021

Boone County is divided into five legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives, four of which are held by Democrats and one Republican.

  • District 9 – Paul Quinn (D-Monroe City). Consists of the communities of Centralia, Harrisburg, and Sturgeon.
Missouri House of Representatives – District 9 – Boone County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Paul Quinn 3,586 100.00
  • District 21 – John W. Cauthorn (R-Mexico). Consists of the community of Hallsville and a small part of the city of Columbia.
Missouri House of Representatives – District 21 – Boone County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican John W. Cauthorn 3,163 54.53
Democratic Kelly Schultz 2,637 45.47
Missouri House of Representatives – District 23 – Boone County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Stephen Weber 9,373 67.98
Republican Paul S. Szopa 4,415 32.02
  • District 24 – Chris Kelly (D-Columbia). Consists of one-fourth of the city of Columbia and all of the communities of Ashland, Hartsburg, McBaine, and Rocheport.
Missouri House of Representatives – District 24 – Boone County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chris Kelly 9,412 55.90
Republican Laura E. Nelson 7,426 44.10
Missouri House of Representatives – District 25 – Boone County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Mary Wynne Still 5,975 100.00

All of Boone County is a part of Missouri’s 19th District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Kurt Schaefer (R-Columbia).

Missouri Senate - District 19 – Boone County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Kurt Schaefer 38,659 47.81
Democratic Chuck Graham 38,290 47.35
Libertarian Christopher W. Dwyer 3,911 4.84

Federal[edit]

All of Boone County is included in Missouri’s 9th Congressional District and is currently represented by Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-St. Elizabeth) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. House of Representatives – Missouri’s 9th Congressional District – Boone County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer 30,616 60.27
Libertarian Christopher W. Dwyer 14,863 29.26

Political Culture[edit]

Past Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2008 43.22% 36,849 55.20% 47,062 1.58% 1,340
2004 49.71% 37,801 49.50% 37,643 0.79% 604
2000 47.69% 28,426 48.33% 28,811 3.98% 2,372
1996 42.46% 22,047 48.12% 24,984 9.42% 4,889

Missouri Presidential Preference Primary (2008)[edit]

Boone County, Missouri
2008 Republican primary in Missouri
John McCain 4,948 (31.26%)
Mike Huckabee 3,838 (24.25%)
Mitt Romney 5,688 (35.94%)
Ron Paul 1,047 (6.62%)
Boone County, Missouri
2008 Democratic primary in Missouri
Hillary Rodham Clinton 9,601 (36.92%)
Barack Obama 15,750 (60.57%)
John Edwards (withdrawn) 396 (1.52%)

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 27, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 211. 
  4. ^ The Story of Little Dixie, Missouri, Missouri Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans, accessed 3 June 2008
  5. ^ T. J. Stiles, Jesse James: The Last Rebel of the Civil War, New York: Vintage Books, 2003, pp.10-11
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved November 13, 2014. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 13, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  12. ^ Registered Voters in Missouri 2008

Further reading[edit]

  • History of Boone County, Missouri: Written and comp. from the most authentic official and private sources; including a history of its townships, towns, and villages. Together with ... biographical sketches and portraits of prominent citizens (1882) online

External links[edit]