Boonton (NJT station)

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Boonton
Boonton Station.jpg
Boonton station facing eastbound on the New Jersey Transit platform. The old Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad station is visible in the far distance.
Station statistics
Address Main Street & Myrtle Avenue
Boonton, NJ
Line(s)
Connections NJT Bus NJT Bus: 871
Commuter Bus Lakeland: 46
Platforms 1 side platform
Tracks 1
Parking Yes
Bicycle facilities Yes
Other information
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Owned by New Jersey Transit
Fare zone 14
Traffic
Passengers (2012) 82 (average weekday)[1]
Services
Preceding station   NJT logo.svg NJ Transit Rail   Following station
toward Hackettstown
Montclair-Boonton Line
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad
toward Denville
Boonton Branch
toward Hoboken
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Station
Boonton (NJT station) is located in Morris County, New Jersey
Boonton (NJT station)
Location Myrtle Ave., Main, and Division Sts., Boonton, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°54′14″N 74°24′23″W / 40.90389°N 74.40639°W / 40.90389; -74.40639Coordinates: 40°54′14″N 74°24′23″W / 40.90389°N 74.40639°W / 40.90389; -74.40639
Area 2.5 acres (1 ha)
Built 1904 (1904)
Architectural style Prairie School
Governing body Private
MPS Operating Passenger Railroad Stations TR
NRHP Reference # 77000889[2]
Added to NRHP July 13, 1977

Boonton Station is a New Jersey Transit station in Boonton, Morris County, New Jersey, United States along the Montclair-Boonton Line.

It is located on Main Street, near Myrtle Avenue and Interstate 287. The original 1905 station was built by architect Frank J. Nies who built other stations for the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad. Unlike most of his stations which tended to be massive Renaissance structures, Boonton Station was built as a simple Prairie House design. The station house is now a bar, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 13, 1977, two years before the establishment of New Jersey Transit and six years before becoming part of their railroad division.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "QUARTERLY RIDERSHIP TRENDS ANALYSIS". New Jersey Transit. Archived from the original on December 27, 2012. Retrieved January 4, 2013. 
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 

External links[edit]