Boost (C++ libraries)

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Boost
Boost.png
Boost logo
Stable release 1.55.0 / November 11, 2013; 8 months ago (2013-11-11)
Written in C++
Type Libraries
License Boost Software License
Website www.boost.org

Boost is a set of libraries for the C++ programming language that provide support for tasks and structures such as linear algebra, pseudorandom number generation, multithreading, image processing, regular expressions, and unit testing. It contains over eighty individual libraries.

Most of the Boost libraries are licensed under the Boost Software License, designed to allow Boost to be used with both free and proprietary software projects. Many of Boost's founders are on the C++ standards committee, and several Boost libraries have been accepted for incorporation into both Technical Report 1 and the C++11 standard.[1]

Design[edit]

The libraries are aimed at a wide range of C++ users and application domains. They range from general-purpose libraries like the smart pointer library, to operating system abstractions like Boost FileSystem, to libraries primarily aimed at other library developers and advanced C++ users, like the template metaprogramming (MPL) and domain-specific language (DSL) creation (Proto).

In order to ensure efficiency and flexibility, Boost makes extensive use of templates. Boost has been a source of extensive work and research into generic programming and metaprogramming in C++.[citation needed]

Most Boost libraries are header based, consisting of inline functions and templates, and as such do not need to be built in advance of their use. Some Boost libraries coexist as independent libraries.[2][3]

Associated people[edit]

Original founders of Boost still active in the community include Beman Dawes and David Abrahams. Author of several books on C++, Nicolai Josuttis contributed the Boost array library in 2001. There are mailing lists devoted to Boost library use and library development, active as of 2014.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Library Technical Report". JTC1/SC22/WG21 - The C++ Standards Committee. 2 July 2003. Retrieved 1 February 2012. 
  2. ^ "Asio web site". 
  3. ^ "Spirit web-site". 
  4. ^ "Boost Mailing Lists (A.K.A. Discussion Groups)". Retrieved 4 February 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Demming, Robert & Duffy, Daniel J. (2010). Introduction to the Boost C++ Libraries. Volume 1 - Foundations. Datasim. ISBN 978-94-91028-01-4. 
  • Demming, Robert & Duffy, Daniel J. (2012). Introduction to the Boost C++ Libraries. Volume 2 - Advanced Libraries. Datasim. ISBN 978-94-91028-02-1. 
  • Karlsson, Björn (2005). Beyond the C++ Standard Library: An Introduction to Boost. Addison-Wesley. ISBN 978-0-321-13354-0. 
  • Polukhin, Antony (2013). Boost C++ Application Development Cookbook. Packt. ISBN 978-1-84951-488-0. 
  • Schäling, Boris (2011). The Boost C++ Libraries. XML Press. ISBN 978-0-9822191-9-5. 
  • Siek, Jeremy G.; Lee, Lie-Quan & Lumsdaine, Andrew (2001). The Boost Graph Library: User Guide and Reference Manual. Addison-Wesley. ISBN 978-0-201-72914-6. 

External links[edit]