Boris Arkadyev

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Boris Arkadyev
Arkadyev.jpg
Personal information
Full name Boris Andreyevich Arkadyev
Date of birth (1899-09-21)21 September 1899
Place of birth Sankt Petersburg, Russian Empire
Date of death 17 October 1986(1986-10-17) (aged 87)
Place of death Moscow, Soviet Union
Height 1,72
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1914 Unitas Sankt Petersburg
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1920-1922 Russkabel Moscow
1923-1925 Sakharniki Moscow
1926-1930 RkimA
1931-1936 Metallurg Moscow
Teams managed
1937-1939 Metallurg Moscow
1940-1944 Dynamo Moscow
1944-1952 CDSA Moscow
1952 USSR
1953-1957 Lokomotiv Moscow
1958-1959 CSK MO Moscow
1959 USSR (Olympics)
1961-1962 Neftyanık Baku
1963-1965 Lokomotiv Moscow
1967 Pakhtakor Tashkent
1968 Neftyanik Fergana
1969 Shinnik Yaroslavl
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 12 May 2012.
† Appearances (Goals).

Boris Andreyevich Arkadyev (Russian: Бори́с Андре́евич Арка́дьев) (1899–1986) was a Russian footballer and a coach. He became the first coach of the Soviet Union national football team. Merited Master of Sports of the USSR (1942), Merited Coach of the USSR (1957).

Among teams of masters that he coached are included Metallurg Moscow (1937–1939), Dinamo Moscow (1940–1944), CDSA Moscow (1944–1952), Lokomotiv Moscow (1953–1957 and 1963–1965), CSK MO Moscow (1958–1959), Neftyanık Baku (1961–1962), Paxtakor Tashkent (1967), Neftyanik Fergana (1968) and FC Shinnik Yaroslavl (1969).

He also was a coach of the Soviet Union Olympic football team in 1959.[1] In 1952 he had his title Merited Master of Sports of the USSR stripped, but it was reinstated back in 1955.

Boris had a twin brother Vitaliy Arkadiev (1899-1987) who was Merited Coach of the USSR in fencing.

Managerial statistics[edit]

Team From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Soviet Union 1952 1952 3 1 1 1 8 9 -1 33.33
Soviet Union (Olympic) 1959 1959 4 1 2 1 3 2 +1 25.00
Total 7 2 3 2 11 11 +0 28.57

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Аркадьев Борис Андреевич". CSKA. Retrieved 5 May 2012. 

External links[edit]