Bornean languages

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Bornean
(geographic)
Geographic
distribution:
Borneo
Linguistic classification: Austronesian
Subdivisions:
Glottolog: None
nort2892  (North Bornean)[1]
grea1283  (Barito)[2]
kaya1333  (Kayanic)[3]
land1261  (Land Dayak)[4]
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The Bornean language families

The Bornean languages are a geographic group of Austronesian language families indigenous to the island of Borneo, with the exclusion of Ibanic (Malayic Dayak) and other Malayic languages. There is little reason to think they form a genealogical clade.

Languages[edit]

The Bornean languages form a number of distinct branches of the Austronesian family.

North Bornean[edit]

North Bornean is a 1991/2010 proposal by Robert Blust that the Northeast Sabahan, Southwest Sabahan, North Sarawakan, and Melanau–Kajang families form an exclusive unit.

Kayan[edit]

The Kayan languages were specifically excluded from the North Borneo family.

Land Dayak[edit]

Land Dayak are the majority of the Dayak languages excluding Ibanic.

Barito[edit]

The Barito languages have common features due to extended contact. They fall into four families:

Proposed substratum[edit]

According to Roger Blench (2010),[5] Austroasiatic languages were once spoken in Borneo. Blench cites Austroasiatic-origin vocabulary words in modern-day Bornean branches such as Land Dayak (Bidayuh, Dayak Bakatiq, etc.), Dusunic (Central Dusun, Visayan, etc.), Kayan, and Kenyah, noting especially resemblances with the Aslian languages of peninsular Malaysia. As further evidence for his proposal, Blench also cites ethnographic evidence such as musical instruments in Borneo shared in common with Austroasiatic-speaking groups in mainland Southeast Asia.

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "North Bornean". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Barito". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Kayanic". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  4. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Land Dayak". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  5. ^ Blench, Roger. 2010. "Was there an Austroasiatic Presence in Island Southeast Asia prior to the Austronesian Expansion?" In Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association , Vol. 30.

References[edit]

  • Blust, Robert. "The Greater North Borneo Hypothesis." Oceanic Linguistics 49.1 (2010): 44-118.
  • Fay Wouk and Malcolm Ross (ed.), The history and typology of western Austronesian voice systems. Australian National University, 2002.
  • K. Alexander Adelaar and Nikolaus Himmelmann, The Austronesian languages of Asia and Madagascar. Routledge, 2005.