Borough of Princeton, New Jersey

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See also: Princeton Township, New Jersey and Princeton, New Jersey
Borough of Princeton, New Jersey
Borough
Former Borough of Princeton highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Former Borough of Princeton highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Borough of Princeton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Borough of Princeton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°21′02″N 74°39′34″W / 40.350461°N 74.659371°W / 40.350461; -74.659371Coordinates: 40°21′02″N 74°39′34″W / 40.350461°N 74.659371°W / 40.350461; -74.659371
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated February 11, 1813
Disestablished January 1, 2013
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Yina Moore (D, term ended December 31, 2012)[1][2][3]
 • Administrator Robert W. Bruschi[4]
 • Clerk Robert W. Bruschi (acting)[5]
Area[7]
 • Total 1.843 sq mi (4.774 km2)
 • Land 1.843 sq mi (4.772 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.001 km2)  0.03%
Area rank 423rd of 566 in state
10th of 13 in county[7]
Elevation[8] 190 ft (58 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 12,307
 • Rank 198th of 566 in state
10th of 13 in county[12]
 • Density 6,679.2/sq mi (2,578.9/km2)
 • Density rank 70th of 566 in state
2nd of 13 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08540, 08542[13]
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402160900[14][7][15]
GNIS feature ID 0885361[16][7]
Website http://www.princetonboro.org/

The Borough of Princeton was a borough until December 31, 2012, that is now one of the two former municipalities making up Princeton, New Jersey. It was located in Mercer County, New Jersey, and was completely surrounded by the former Princeton Township, from which it was formed in 1894. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough had a population of 12,307,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 1,896 (-13.3%) from the 14,203 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,187 (+18.2%) from the 12,016 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

The Borough of Princeton was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 11, 1813, within portions of West Windsor Township (in what was then part of Middlesex County) and Montgomery Township (in Somerset County), and was reincorporated on November 27, 1822. The borough became part of the newly created Mercer County in 1838, and became a fully independent municipality circa 1894. Portions of territory were acquired from Princeton Township on January 4, 1928 and August 21, 1951.[18] On November 8, 2011, voters in Princeton Borough voted to consolidate with Princeton Township.[19]

Morven, the former residence of the Governor of New Jersey, is at 55 Stockton Street in the former borough, while the current residence is Drumthwacket in the former township.

Geography[edit]

Princeton borough was located at 40°21′02″N 74°39′34″W / 40.350461°N 74.659371°W / 40.350461; -74.659371 (40.350461,-74.659371). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.843 square miles (4.774 km2), all of which was land.[20][7]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 2,798
1880 3,209 14.7%
1890 3,422 6.6%
1900 3,899 13.9%
1910 5,136 31.7%
1920 5,917 15.2%
1930 6,992 18.2%
1940 7,719 10.4%
1950 12,230 58.4%
1960 11,890 −2.8%
1970 12,311 3.5%
1980 12,035 −2.2%
1990 12,016 −0.2%
2000 14,203 18.2%
2010 12,307 −13.3%
Est. 2011 12,131 [21] −1.4%
Population sources:
1870[22] 1880-1890[23]
1890-1910[24] 1910-1930[25]
1930-1990[26] 2000[27] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 12,307 people, 3,161 households, and 1,644 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,679.2 per square mile (2,578.9 /km2). There were 3,488 housing units at an average density of 1,893.0 per square mile (730.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 72.07% (8,870) White, 6.44% (793) Black or African American, 0.18% (22) Native American, 13.51% (1,663) Asian, 0.16% (20) Pacific Islander, 4.13% (508) from other races, and 3.50% (431) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.30% (1,268) of the population.[9]

There were 3,161 households, of which 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.4% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.0% were non-families. 39.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.96.[9]

In the borough, 11.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 43.7% from 18 to 24, 19.6% from 25 to 44, 14.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22.9 years. For every 100 females there were 104.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.6 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $104,234 (with a margin of error of +/- $20,004) and the median family income was $148,295 (+/- $34,644). Males had a median income of $96,225 (+/- $29,348) versus $82,572 (+/- $28,930) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,566 (+/- $5,208). About 2.5% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 14,203 people, 3,326 households, and 1,692 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,686.3 people per square mile (2,964.2/km²). There were 3,495 housing units at an average density of 1,891.4 per square mile (729.4/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 80.26% White, 6.39% African American, 0.28% Native American, 7.46% Asian, 0.14% Pacific Islander, 2.50% from other races, and 2.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.10% of the population.[27][29] Most of the Hispanic population consists of Mexican and Guatemalan immigrants.

There were 3,326 households out of which 22.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 49.1% were non-families. 40.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.92.[27][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 10.1% under the age of 18, 40.9% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 12.3% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females there were 108.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.8 males.[27][29] The borough's unusually low median age and high concentration of 18- to 24-year-olds is influenced by Princeton University.

The median income for a household in the borough was $67,346, and the median income for a family was $102,957. Males had a median income of $60,341 versus $52,900 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,292. About 2.9% of families and 9.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.4% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.[27][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Nassau Street, the main street of the Borough of Princeton

The Borough of Princeton was governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consisted of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor was elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consisted of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

The Mayor served as the borough's Chief Executive Officer and nominated appointees to various boards and commissions subject to approval of the Borough Council. The Mayor presided at the Borough Council meetings and voted in the case of a tie or a few other specific cases.

The Borough Council had administrative powers and was the policy-making body of the Borough. The Council had six members; two were elected each year and they served three-year terms. The Council approved appointments made by the Mayor. Council Members served on various boards and committees and acted as liaison's to certain Departments, Committees or Boards. The Mayor of the Borough of Princeton, New Jersey was Yina Moore (D, term ended on December 31, 2012). Members of the Borough Council were Jo Butler (D, 2012), Jenny Crumiller (D, 2012), Heather Howard (D, 2012), Roger Martindell (D, 2012), Barbara Trelstad (D, 2012) and Kevin Wilkes (D, 2012).[1][2]

Merger of Borough and Township[edit]

On November 8, 2011, the residents of both the Borough of Princeton and the Township of Princeton voted to merge the two municipalities into one. In Princeton Borough 1,385 voted for, 902 voted against while in Princeton Township 3,542 voted for and 604 voted against. Proponents of the merger asserted that when the merger is completed the new municipality of Princeton will save $3.2 million as a result of some scaled-down services, including layoffs of 15 government workers, including 9 police officers (however, the measure itself does not mandate such layoffs). Opponents of the measure challenged the findings of the report, citing cost savings as unsubstantiated, and noted that voter representation would be reduced in a smaller government structure.[19] The consolidation is to take effect in 2013.[30] December 31, 2012 was the last day the Borough of Princeton existed as a municipality.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

The Borough of Princeton was in the 12th Congressional district[31] and was part of New Jersey's 16th state legislative district.[10][32] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Princeton Boro had been in the 15th state legislative district.[31]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[33] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[34][35] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[36][37]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 16th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher Bateman (R, Somerville) and in the General Assembly by Jack Ciattarelli (R, Hillsborough Township) and Donna Simon (R, Readington Township). [38][39] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[40] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[41]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy.[42] As of 2013, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D; term ends December 31, 2013, Princeton).[43] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the board selects a Freeholder Chair and Vice-Chair from among its members.[44] Mercer County's freeholders are Freeholder Chair John Cimino (D; 2014, Hamilton Township)[45], Freeholder Vice Chair Andrew Koontz (D; 2013, Princeton),[46] Ann M. Cannon (D; 2015, East Windsor Township),[47] Anthony P. Carabelli (D; 2013, Trenton),[48] Pasqual "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (D; 2015, Lawrence Township),[49] Samuel T. Frisby (D; 2015; Trenton)[50] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (D; 2014, Ewing Township)[51][52] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello (D, 2015).[53] Sheriff John A. "Jack" Kemler (D, 2014)[54] and Surrogate Dianne Gerofsky (D, 2016).[55][1]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,561 registered voters in the Borough of Princeton, of which 3,493 (53.2%) were registered as Democrats, 620 (9.4%) were registered as Republicans and 2,440 (37.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered to other parties.[56]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 80.4% of the vote here (3,880 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 17.0% (819 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (51 votes), among the 4,828 ballots cast by the borough's 7,679 registered voters, for a turnout of 62.9%.[57] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 73.0% of the vote here (3,475 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 21.9% (1,043 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (67 votes), among the 4,763 ballots cast by the borough's 6,938 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.7.[58]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 69.4% of the vote here (1,786 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 23.6% (608 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.4% (139 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (18 votes), among the 2,572 ballots cast by the borough's 7,026 registered voters, yielding a 36.6% turnout.[59]

Education[edit]

Colleges and universities[edit]

Two thirds of the buildings of Princeton University was located within the borough (the rest of Princeton University, aside from a small enclave and the Plasma Physics Laboratory in West Windsor Township and land in East Windsor Township, was in the township). However, the university owns more land in West Windsor than in the two Princeton municipalities combined.

Westminster Choir College (part of Rider University) and most of Princeton Theological Seminary were located in the borough.

The Institute for Advanced Study was in the township.

Primary and secondary schools[edit]

Public schools[edit]

For grades K through 12, public school students attend the Princeton Regional Schools, a regional school district shared with Princeton Township that also serves students from Cranbury Township, as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[60] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[61]) are Community Park Elementary School (grades K-5, 321 students; located in Princeton Township), Johnson Park Elementary School (K-5, 372; Princeton Township), Littlebrook Elementary School (K-5, 335; Princeton Township), Riverside Elementary School (K-5, 276; Princeton Township), John Witherspoon Middle School (6-8, 664; Princeton Township) and Princeton High School (9-12, 1,420; Borough of Princeton).[62]

All of the district's schools through eighth grade were in Princeton Township, with Community Park School being the closest primary school to the borough. The district's high school was located within the borough of Princeton.

The Princeton Charter School, located in the township, opened in September 1997 and serves students from the borough and township who are selected by lottery from among applicants.[63][64]

Private schools[edit]

Private schools located in the borough include St. Paul School.

Public libraries[edit]

The Princeton Public Library, located in the borough, serves the borough and the township.

Popular culture[edit]

Princeton is the setting for the fictional Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital in the TV series House

Sister city[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Elected Officials, p. 13. Mercer County, New Jersey, Revised January 26, 2012. Accessed November 20, 2012. As of date accessed, a term-end year of 2015 is listed for Yina Moore.
  2. ^ a b Elected Officials, Borough of Princeton. Accessed November 20, 2012. As of date accessed, term-end years of 2013 are listed for mayor and all council members.
  3. ^ 2012 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, dated August 9, 2012. Accessed November 20, 2012. As of date accessed, a term-end year of 2012 is listed for Yina Moore.
  4. ^ The Borough Administrator, Borough of Princeton. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  5. ^ The Borough Clerk, Borough of Princeton. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 73.
  7. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 27, 2012.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Princeton, Geographic Names Information System, accessed October 18, 2007.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Princeton borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Princeton borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Princeton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 27, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 163. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Clerkin, Bridget (November 8, 2011). "Princeton voters approve consolidation of borough, township into one municipality". The Times (Trenton, NJ). Retrieved November 9, 2011. 
  20. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  21. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2011, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  22. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  23. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Princeton borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Princeton borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Princeton borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  30. ^ "2 Princetons vote to merge into 1 town". Asbury Park Press (Asbury Park, NJ). Associated Press. November 8, 2011. Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  31. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen’s Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  32. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  33. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  34. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  35. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  36. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  37. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  39. ^ District 16 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  40. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  41. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  42. ^ Elected Officials, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  43. ^ County Executive, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  44. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  45. ^ John Cimino, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  46. ^ Andrew Koontz, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  47. ^ Ann M. Cannon, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  48. ^ Anthony P. Carabelli, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr., Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Samuel T. Frisby, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed August 1, 2011.
  51. ^ Lucylle R. S. Walter, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ County Clerk, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Meet the Sheriff, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Meet Surrogate Diane Gerofsky, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Mercer, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  57. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  58. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  59. ^ 2009 Governor: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  60. ^ Princeton Regional Schools 2011 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 20, 2012. "As we strive each hour to serve approximately 3500 pupils from Princeton Township, Princeton Borough and Cranbury Township well, we do so knowing that the work in our classrooms, on our courts, fields and stages and in our offices matters deeply in the individual lives of each child."
  61. ^ Data for the Princeton Regional Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  62. ^ New Jersey School Directory Listings for the Princeton Regional Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  63. ^ History and Mission, Princeton Charter School. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  64. ^ Admissions, Princeton Charter School. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  65. ^ Online Directory: New Jersey, USA, Sister Cities International. Accessed November 8, 2007.
  66. ^ "Near-Masterpiece", Time (magazine), November 10, 1930. Accessed July 15, 2007. "Last week Princeton's most popular citizen and onetime mayor, Dr. Charles Browne, published part of his wisdom in the form of a cook book."
  67. ^ The Ultimate New Jersey High School Year Book. 

External links[edit]