Boston College High School

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Boston College High School
Address
150 Morrissey Boulevard
Boston, Massachusetts, (Suffolk County), 02125
United States
Coordinates 42°18′58″N 71°2′47″W / 42.31611°N 71.04639°W / 42.31611; -71.04639Coordinates: 42°18′58″N 71°2′47″W / 42.31611°N 71.04639°W / 42.31611; -71.04639
Information
Type Private
Motto "Ut Cognoscant Te"[1]
(So they may know You.)
Religious affiliation(s) Roman Catholic
Established 1863
Founder John McElroy, SJ
Oversight Board of Trustees
President William Kemeza
Principal Stephen Hughes
Vice principal Charles Drane,
Robert Hamblet,
Michael Brennan
Faculty 120 (approx.)
Grades 712
Gender Boys
Enrollment 1,500 (approx.) (2010)
Student to teacher ratio 13:1 [1]
Campus size 40 acres (160,000 m2)
Color(s) Maroon and Gold         
Athletics MIAA Division 1
Athletics conference Catholic Conference
Sports MIAA Division 1
Mascot Eagle
Team name Eagles
Rivals Catholic Memorial, St. John's Prep, Xaverian
Accreditation New England Association of Schools and Colleges[2]
Publication The Botolphian (literary magazine)
Newspaper 'The Eagle'
Yearbook 'Renaissance'
Endowment $50+ million
Affiliation Jesuit
Alumni 15,000+ living
Academic Dean Kim Smith
Dean of Student Affairs Nelson Miranda
Admissions Director Jim Nicoletti
Athletic Director John Bartlett
Website

Boston College High School (also known as BC High) is an all-male Jesuit Roman Catholic college preparatory secondary school founded in 1863 with historical ties to Boston College. It has an enrollment in grades 7-12 of approximately 1,500 students and is located on a 40-acre (160,000 m2) campus on Morrissey Boulevard in the Dorchester section of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. A graduate of BC High who goes on to Boston College is known as a "Double Eagle." If he then goes on to Boston College Law School, he is then known as a "Triple Eagle."

History[edit]

BC's founder, Fr. John McElroy, SJ

On March 31, 1863, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts approved a charter for the incorporation of Boston College. Fr. Johannes Bapst, SJ, was selected first president and presided over the original grounds on Harrison Avenue in Boston's South End. For most of its early history, BC offered a singular 7-year program corresponding to both high school and college. Its first entering class of 22 students ranged in age from 11 to 16 years. The curriculum was based on the Jesuit Ratio Studiorum, emphasizing Latin, Greek, philosophy and theology. While BC's mission, as articulated by founder Fr. John McElroy, SJ, was to "educate pupils in the principles and practice of the Catholic faith," its founding documents reflect the historical realities of the time. The great influx of immigrants to Boston in the nineteenth century corresponded with growing anti-Catholic sentiment among the city's aristocratic elite. As a result, BC's charter was revolutionary for its time in stating that "the profession of religion will not be a necessary condition for admission to the College."

BC High's original campus in Boston's South End. the building has been converted to residential condominiums. On the right, a corner of the Jesuit Urban Center can be seen.

By the start of the 20th century, BC's enrollment had reached nearly 500. Expansion of the South End buildings onto James Street enabled increased division between the high school and the college. The 1907 purchase of farmland for a new college campus in Chestnut Hill allowed BC High to fully expand into the South End buildings, though it remained a constituent part of Boston College until 1927 when it was separately incorporated. Nonetheless, traditional ties between BC High and BC have survived, and Boston College remains a leading destination for BC High graduates. Alumni who graduate from both institutions are called "Double Eagles" (with "Triple Eagles" going on to Boston College Law School).

Following the Great Depression, BC High was characterized by increasing enrollment and aging facilities. By the 1940s, the South End buildings proved inadequate once again. Overcrowding and a demand for athletic fields led President Fr. Robert A. Hewitt, SJ, to purchase 70 acres (28 ha) on Columbia Point, in the Boston neighborhood of Dorchester in 1948, a move that was controversial at the time. At a cost of $240,000, critics warned that BC High would be abandoning its city roots and moving to an undeveloped part of the city. But Father Hewitt had a vision, and he dreamed of "a modern high school with a full range of scholastic facilities, including science laboratories, and a library; the necessary ecclesiastical facilities, including a Jesuit faculty residence and a church; a wide range of athletic facilities, including a gymnasium, field house, and outdoor areas for a variety of sports, both interscholastic and intramural, and areas for general recreation, faculty walks, parking and campus landscaping."

Father Hewitt's dream began to see fruition in 1950, with the opening of McElroy Hall and the relocation of the junior and senior classes to the new campus. By 1954, the entire student body had moved to Columbia Point, though members of the Jesuit Community remained at the South End Residence until 1957. In that year, Loyola Hall, the new Jesuit residence, was completed. Successive building campaigns saw the opening of the Walsh Hall Science Center in 1965, the Student Training, Athletic and Recreation Complex (S.T.A.R.) in 1975, Corcoran Library in 1997, and the multi-use McNeice Pavilion in 1988. William J. Kemeza is the current president of Boston College High School. He was the founder of BC High's Renaissance Campaign.

"Renaissance" Campaign[edit]

BC High completed a 63,000-square-foot (5,900 m2) addition in the spring of 2005. The project included a new state-of-the-art science building, new administrative offices, a new cafeteria, and a general commons. Afterward, during the fall of 2005, President William J. Kemeza announced "Renaissance: The Campaign for Boston College High School," a $40 million fundraising effort. The campaign raised over $51 million at its conclusion in June 2008. As part of the campaign, the school underwent a $12.5 million renovation project which included the renovation of the Cushing, Walsh and McElroy buildings. The Corcoran Library has also been updated with the addition of a "Great Books Room", which alone is said to have cost $500,000. The same $12.6 million has also been used for an outdoor space with new entrance gates, a new road through campus, a second synthetic turf athletic field, and multi-purpose open spaces including plazas, athletic fields, and gardens. With the commencement of the 2007-2008 school year, the new performing arts center, the Bulger Center (formerly Dever Auditorium), will be available for use by BC High's numerous performing groups, as well as for small school functions.

Traditions and Events[edit]

Boston College High School has many traditions including:

  • Freshman Olympics
  • Kairos Retreats
  • Ignatian Awards- Alumni awards for those who do service without being recognized
  • Thanksgiving Football Rivalry with Catholic Memorial High School
  • Hockey vs CM often held at Boston College or Fenway Park in 2012
  • Good Friday Walk
  • Service trips to the Dominican Republic and Camden, NJ
  • Freshman Declamation- Each freshman remembers 25+ lines of The Odyssey by Homer and recites them to the class. The best one from each class presents his declamation in front of the school, where faculty picks the winner.
  • Sophomore Declamation- Each sophomore remembers an American Poem and recites it to his class. The best from each class advances to the school final.
  • Exalauno Day "March Forth"- On Every March 4, the BC High Classics Department holds a declamation for students studying Greek or Latin.

Grades 7 and 8[edit]

On January 11, 2006, BC High announced the addition of a seventh and eighth grade to its high school program beginning in September 2007.[3] These classes are conducted in the newly renovated Walsh building. These grades are in addition to the traditional 9-12 grade system and is known as the Arrupe Division.[4] The name Arrupe comes from the late Father Pedro Arrupe, who was a notable missionary, and an influential Jesuit. The Arrupe division differs from the rest of the school in their stricter rules and more involvement from the teachers.

Buildings[edit]

  • McElroy Hall (3 floors): The Classics (2nd Floor) and Modern Language (end of 3rd floor) departments and most Language, History, Religious Education, and English classrooms.
  • Cushing Hall (2 floors): The Math Department and classrooms on the second floor; the Corcoran Library on the first floor.
  • Loyola Hall (3 floors): Houses the Chapel, Faculty Dining Room, "Eagles Nest" faculty daycare center, Jesuit Residence, President's Office, the History, English, and Religious Education Departments, as well as many administrative departments.
  • Walsh Hall (3 floors): Houses the Arrupe Division (7th and 8th Grades), formerly a part of the High School.
  • McQuillan Hall (3 floors): Newest addition to BC High Campus in 2005. Houses the Admissions Office, Principal's Office, Bookstore, Guidance Department, Cafeteria, Campus Ministry, and many classrooms.
  • McNeice Pavilion (Gym): Basketball courts, locker rooms, indoor track, and weight room.
  • Gregory E. Bulger Performing Arts Center (Theater), formerly Dever Auditorium
  • Cadigan Hall: A second gym, for the Arrupe Division, new art classrooms and theaters as well as a student lounge will be in Cadigan Hall. The new hall was announced in the spring of 2012.

Athletic Achievements[edit]

State Championships[edit]

The 2009 Indoor Track Relay Team won the Massachusetts State Relays.[5][6]

Track 2008-2009 season MA State Champions

MIAA State Championships
Season Sport Number of Championships Year
Fall Football 4 1977, 2000, 2008, 2011
Soccer 1 2004
Golf 1 2011
Rowing 3 2011, 2012, 2013 New England Fall Champions
Winter Hockey (Super 8) 5 1996, 2002, 2006, 2007
Basketball, Boys 2 1917, 2007
Swimming 4 1997, 1998, 1999, 2005
Spring Sailing 7 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2012
Baseball 3 2001, 2008, 2009
Rugby 2 NERFU Champs 2004,2005,2006. National Championship Runner up 2004 placed #10 in the country
Tennis 1 2013
Rowing 1 2013 NEIRA Champions
Total 29

In 2008 after an 83 year absence rowing returned to BC High. The rowing "Crew" team has been in the Head of the Charles since the rebirth in '08. The team just finished 4th in the country, placing 8th at the 2011 HOCR. Recently the Crew team placed 5th at the 2012 HOCR and 7 at the 2013 HOCR.

School Facts[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Catholic Memorial High School
Super Eight Hockey Tournament Champions
2006 and 2007
Succeeded by
Reading Memorial High School
Preceded by
Catholic Memorial High School
Super Eight Hockey Tournament Champions
2002
Succeeded by
Catholic Memorial High School
Preceded by
Catholic Memorial High School
Super Eight Hockey Tournament Champions
1996
Succeeded by
Arlington Catholic High School