Bouquet garni

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Bouquet garni of thyme, bay leaves, and sage, tied with a string.

The bouquet garni [bukɛ ɡaʁni] (French for "garnished bouquet") is a bundle of herbs usually tied together with string and mainly used to prepare soup, stock, and various stews. The bouquet is cooked with the other ingredients, but is removed prior to consumption.

There is no generic recipe for bouquet garni, but most recipes include thyme and bay leaf. Depending on the recipe, the bouquet garni may also include parsley, basil, burnet, chervil, rosemary, peppercorns, savory and tarragon. Vegetables such as carrot, celery (leaves or leaf stalks), celeriac, leek, onion and parsley root are sometimes included in the bouquet.

Sometimes, the bouquet is not bound with string, and its ingredients are filled into a small sachet, a net, or even a tea strainer, instead. Traditionally, the aromatics are bound within leek leaves, though a coffee filter (or cheesecloth) and butcher twine can be used, instead.

The term "faggot" was an antiquated name for the bouquet garni.[1]

Dishes made with a bouquet garni include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Escoffier, Auguste (1907). A Guide to Modern Cookery. London: William Heinemann. p. 72. OCLC 5362680. OL 24167463M. Retrieved September 22, 2014. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • The New Larousse Gastronomique, Crown Publishers, Inc., NY, NY ISBN 0-517-53137-2, p. 141