Box-spring

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This article is about the frame used to support a mattress. For the spring in Yellowstone Park, see Box Spring.

A box-spring (or Divan in the UK) is a type of bed base typically consisting of a sturdy wooden frame covered in cloth, and containing springs. Usually the box-spring is placed on top of a wooden or metal bedframe which sits on the floor and acts as a brace. The box-spring is usually the same size as the much softer mattress which is placed above the box-spring. Working together, the frame, box-spring, and mattress make up a bed. It is common to find a box-spring and mattress being used together without the support of a frame underneath, the box spring being mounted directly on casters standing on the floor.

Queen size box-spring on metal bed frame

The purpose of the box-spring is threefold:

  • to raise the mattress' height, making it easier to get in and out of bed;
  • to absorb shock and reduce wear to the mattress; and
  • to create a flat and firm structure for the mattress to lie upon.

The first rectangular spring-cushioned wire frames to support mattresses did not have wood rims or cloth covers. These were called bedsprings. More and more box-springs are being made out of wood, then covered in fabrics. Wood makes a better support system for the newer memory foam and latex mattresses.[citation needed] The newest design in box-springs is the folding box spring made of wood and springs, then covered in fabric which can fold in half and can be sent by shipping and courier companies.[1]

With the increasing height of mattresses, manufacturers now make box springs in different heights. Standard "high profile" box springs are 9 inches (23 cm) in height, whereas "low profile" box springs are between 5 and 5.5 inches (13 and 14 cm). The difference between the two heights is purely aesthetic and makes no difference in the support provided for the mattress.

Alternatives[edit]

Box-spring beds are especially popular in the United States, Canada and Australia.

8-way hand-tied box-spring-Shifman Mattresses

Alternatively, in Japan, futon mattresses are usually either placed on a bedframe or on the floor, without the use of springs; in Europe, mattresses are usually placed on a slatted base on the bedframe. This lath floor provides suspension, allows the mattress to ventilate, and can be designed to be vertically adjustable in order to elevate the legs and / or the torso.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2008/03/05/invention-machine-and-the-case-of-the-boxed-up-box-spring/