Boxers attacks on Chinese Eastern Railway

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Boxers attacks on Chinese Eastern Railway
Part of the Boxer Rebellion
Date 1900
Location Manchuria, China
Result Russia occupies the railway again
Belligerents
Eight-Nation Alliance Qing dynasty Qing Dynasty
Righteous Harmony Society

The Boxers attacks on Chinese Eastern Railway during Boxer Rebellion took place at 1900. In response Russia invaded Manchuria.

Battle[edit]

Chinese Imperial troops engaged in attacks against Russians, in one incident, Chinese troops killed a cossack.[1] Another 15 Russian casualties occurred when Chinese cavalry attacked the Russians.[2] The Boxers destroyed railways and cut lines for telegraphs. The Yen-t'ai coal mines were burned by Chinese forces.[3]

Chinese used arson to destroy a bridge carrying a railway and a barracks in the 27th of July.[4]

The Boxers destroyed railways in Manchuria in a strategic manouveres to halt enemy soldiers from moving. Imperial edicts were posted which called for attacks against the Russians, the stations of the South Manchuria Railway came under Boxer control.

With the building of the South Manchurian Railway, Mukden became a Russian stronghold, which occupied it after the Boxer Rebellion.[5][6]

After Russia invaded with regular troops, the railway came under Russian control again.

Notes[edit]

  •  This article incorporates text from The Century illustrated monthly magazine, Volume 68, a publication from 1904 now in the public domain in the United States.
  •  This article incorporates text from The Century: a popular quarterly, Volume 68, by Making of America Project, a publication from 1904 now in the public domain in the United States.
  1. ^ Eugene M. Wait (2003). Imperialism. Nova History Publications. p. 406. ISBN 1-59033-664-X. Retrieved 2010-11-28. 
  2. ^ George Alexander Lensen (1967). The Russo-Chinese War. Diplomatic Press. p. 50. Retrieved 2010-11-28. 
  3. ^ George Alexander Lensen (1967). The Russo-Chinese War. Diplomatic Press. p. 14. Retrieved 2010-11-28. 
  4. ^ George Alexander Lensen (1967). The Russo-Chinese War. Diplomatic Press. p. 14. Retrieved 2010-11-28. 
  5. ^ The Century illustrated monthly magazine, Volume 68. NEW YORK: The Century Co. 1904. p. 581. Retrieved 2011-07-06. (Original from Harvard University)
  6. ^ Making of America Project (1904). The Century: a popular quarterly, Volume 68. NEW YORK: Scribner & Co. p. 581. Retrieved 2011-07-06. (Original from the University of Michigan)