Bradley Beach, New Jersey

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Bradley Beach, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Bradley Beach
Motto: "New Jersey's Family Resort"[1]
Map of Bradley Beach in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Bradley Beach in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bradley Beach, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Bradley Beach, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°12′06″N 74°00′43″W / 40.201604°N 74.012057°W / 40.201604; -74.012057Coordinates: 40°12′06″N 74°00′43″W / 40.201604°N 74.012057°W / 40.201604; -74.012057[2][3]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated March 13, 1893
Named for James A. Bradley
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • Mayor Gary Engelstad (term ends December 31, 2016)[4]
 • Administrator Gail O'Reilly[5]
 • Clerk Mary Ann Solinski[5]
Area[3]
 • Total 0.633 sq mi (1.639 km2)
 • Land 0.612 sq mi (1.585 km2)
 • Water 0.021 sq mi (0.054 km2)  3.32%
Area rank 535th of 566 in state
44th of 53 in county[3]
Elevation[7] 16 ft (5 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 4,298
 • Estimate (2013[11]) 4,276
 • Rank 399th of 566 in state
37th of 53 in county[12]
 • Density 7,023.6/sq mi (2,711.8/km2)
 • Density rank 60th of 566 in state
4th of 53 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07720[13][14]
Area code(s) 732[15]
FIPS code 3402506970[16][3][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885167[18][3]
Website www.bradleybeachonline.com

Bradley Beach is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,298,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 495 (-10.3%) from the 4,793 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 318 (+7.1%) from the 4,475 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] The summer population can reach 30,000.[20][21]

History[edit]

Bradley Beach was named for James A. Bradley, the developer responsible for the creation of the Bradley Beach and Asbury Park. In 1871, William B. Bradner, with James A. Bradley as an investor, acquired 54 acres (22 ha) of land north of Avon-by-the-Sea, and south of Ocean Grove.[22] At the time the area where they had purchased their land was known informally as Ocean Park and was part of Ocean Township and later became part of Neptune Township.[23]

Citizens appealed to the New Jersey Legislature for a referendum to separate Bradley Beach from Neptune Township, and on March 13, 1893, Bradley Beach was incorporated, based on the results of a referendum held on March 6, 1893. The borough's incorporation was confirmed on March 13, 1925.[24]

It was the first location in the United States to charge sea bathers for beach access when it began minting its own tin badges starting in 1929.[25]

Sand dunes were constructed on the borough's beaches in the mid-1990s at a cost of $10,000, using snow fences and discarded Christmas trees to build a base of wind-driven sand that rose 15 feet (4.6 m), atop which dune grass was planted. These dunes helped provide significant protection to Bradley Beach from the havoc wreaked by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, blunting the impact of the storm surge and limiting damage in the borough to beach areas and homes near the shore to $3 million, while neighboring communities that hadn't constructed such dunes suffered much more extensive damage.[26]

The borough had gone into decline after World War II, with growth returning around 2000 as seasonal visitors and new residents purchased properties, which borough regulations require that they must be renovated on the same footprint as the original home.[21]

Geography[edit]

Bradley Beach is located at 40°12′06″N 74°00′43″W / 40.201604°N 74.012057°W / 40.201604; -74.012057 (40.201604,-74.012057). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.633 square miles (1.639 km2), of which, 0.612 square miles (1.585 km2) of it was land and 0.021 square miles (0.054 km2) of it (3.32%) was water.[3][2]

The beach and boardwalk of Bradley Beach

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 982
1910 1,807 84.0%
1920 2,307 27.7%
1930 3,306 43.3%
1940 3,468 4.9%
1950 3,911 12.8%
1960 4,204 7.5%
1970 4,163 −1.0%
1980 4,772 14.6%
1990 4,475 −6.2%
2000 4,793 7.1%
2010 4,298 −10.3%
Est. 2013 4,276 [11] −0.5%
Population sources: 1900-1920[27]
1900-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,298 people, 2,098 households, and 979.8 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,023.6 per square mile (2,711.8 /km2). There were 3,180 housing units at an average density of 5,196.6 per square mile (2,006.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.06% (3,656) White, 4.96% (213) Black or African American, 0.42% (18) Native American, 1.81% (78) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 5.21% (224) from other races, and 2.51% (108) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 19.54% (840) of the population.[8]

There were 2,098 households, of which 17.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.0% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 53.3% were non-families. 42.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.05 and the average family size was 2.80.[8]

In the borough, 14.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 32.8% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.5 years. For every 100 females there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.9 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $59,792 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,658) and the median family income was $75,575 (+/- $7,930). Males had a median income of $51,250 (+/- $12,410) versus $39,902 (+/- $12,133) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,446 (+/- $4,420). About 2.5% of families and 14.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

Victorian Homes in Bradley Beach, NJ

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 4,793 people, 2,297 households, and 1,086 families residing in the borough. The population density was 8,097.6 people per square mile (3,136.6/km2). There were 3,132 housing units at an average density of 5,291.4 per square mile (2,049.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.15% White, 3.86% African American, 0.17% Native American, 1.46% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 4.01% from other races, and 2.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.83% of the population.[31][32]

There were 2,297 households out of which 18.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.4% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 52.7% were non-families. 42.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.09 and the average family size was 2.91.[31][32]

In the borough the population was spread out with 18.0% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 38.6% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.3 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the borough was $40,878, and the median income for a family was $49,688. Males had a median income of $37,164 versus $31,276 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,438. About 5.7% of families and 9.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.9% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Bradley Beach has been governed by a Faulkner Act form of New Jersey municipal government under the Small Municipality plan 5, as implemented on July 1, 1992, based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission.[34][35] The officials that head the government are elected at large in partisan elections, including a mayor who is elected to a four-year term of office and four council members who are chosen to serve three-year terms on a concurrent basis.[6][36] As of 2010, the borough's nonpartisan elections were shifted from May to the November general election as part of an effort to reduce costs and increase voter participation.[37][38] The borough had previously operated under the Walsh Act form of New Jersey municipal government starting in 1915, and used a five-member commission, with one member selected to serve as Mayor.[39]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Bradley Beach is Gary Engelstad, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2016.[40] Borough Council Members are Council President Patrick D’Angelo, Harold Cotler, Salvatore A. Galassetti and Norman Goldfarb, all serving concurrent terms ending December 31, 2013.[36][41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Bradley Beach is located in the 4th Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 30th state legislative district.[9][43][44] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Bradley Beach had been in the 11th state legislative district.[45] Prior to the 2010 Census, Bradley Beach had been part of the 6th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[45]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[49][50]

The 30th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert Singer (R, Lakewood Township) and in the General Assembly by Sean T. Kean (R, Wall Township) and Dave Rible (R, Wall Township).[51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[54] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[55] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[56] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[57] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[58] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[59][60] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[61] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[62] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[63]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,514 registered voters in Bradley Beach, of which 763 (30.4%) were registered as Democrats, 468 (18.6%) were registered as Republicans and 1,279 (50.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[64]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 56.2% of the vote here (1,152 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 39.7% (814 votes) and other candidates with 2.1% (43 votes), among the 2,050 ballots cast by the borough's 2,803 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.1%.[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 54.5% of the vote here (1,133 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 43.9% (912 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (24 votes), among the 2,078 ballots cast by the borough's 2,964 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 70.1.[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 51.8% of the vote here (667 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 40.0% (515 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.8% (87 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (13 votes), among the 1,287 ballots cast by the borough's 2,641 registered voters, yielding a 48.7% turnout.[67]

Education[edit]

The Bradley Beach School District is a single-school district serving public school students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. Bradley Beach School served an enrollment of 289 students in the 2010-11 school year.[68]

For public school students in ninth through twelfth grades, the school district maintains a sending/receiving relationship with Asbury Park High School.[69] A lottery system for entry into the Neptune High School and an application program with Red Bank Regional High School or any of the schools in the Monmouth County Vocational School District are alternatives available for students from the borough attending public high school.[70]

Public school students also have the option to attend Academy Charter High School in Lake Como, which accepts students on a lottery basis from the communities of Allenhurst, Asbury Park, Avon-by-the-Sea, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Deal, Interlaken and Lake Como.[69][71]

Public high school students may also apply to attend one of the magnet schools in the Monmouth County Vocational School DistrictMarine Academy of Science and Technology, Academy of Allied Health & Science, High Technology High School, Biotechnology High School, and Communications High School.[72]

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides rail service at the Bradley Beach station[73] connecting the borough to Hoboken Terminal, Newark Penn Station, Secaucus Junction and New York Penn Station on the North Jersey Coast Line[74]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available between the borough and Philadelphia on the 317 route, with local service offered on the 830 route.[75]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former Bradley Beach residents include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pallone, Jr., Frank. "In Honor of Stephen G. Schueler", Congressional Record, Volume 154, Number 96, June 11, 2008. Accessed August 28, 2013. "Located on the Jersey Shore, Bradley Beach is New Jersey's Family Resort with a year round population of 5,000 that swells to 30,000 in the summer months as families come to enjoy the sand, surf, and bustling downtown."
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed October 29, 2013. As of date accessed, term-end date for Engelstad is shown as June 30, 2016.
  5. ^ a b Contact Us, Borough of Bradley Beach. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 58.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Bradley Beach, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Bradley Beach borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 13. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Bradley Beach borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Bradley Beach, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Bradley Beach, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  20. ^ A Brief History on Bradley Beach, NJ, accessed May 1, 2007. "Today, the year-round population is 5,000 - but it soars to 30,000 during the summer months."
  21. ^ a b Kirby, David. "HAVENS; Weekender | Bradley Beach, N.J.", The New York Times, June 11, 2004. Accessed August 28, 2013. "It fell into a decline, despite the continuing presence of a loyal corps of year-rounders, and then, six or seven years ago, more weekenders began fixing up old houses.... The population swells from 5,000 to 30,000 in season as parents bring their children for old-fashioned summers by the sea. Renovations are the norm because zoning ordinances require that rebuilding be done on the original footprint."
  22. ^ ABOUT US - A HISTORY OF BRADLEY BEACH, Bradley Beach on-line. Accessed August 19, 2007.
  23. ^ A Brief History on Bradley Beach, Bradley-Beach.com. Accessed August 19, 2007.
  24. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 178. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  25. ^ Bowman, Bill. "Beach tags, N.J. novelty, turn 75 BADGES WERE A BRADLEY BEACH BRAINCHILD", Asbury Park Press, June 26, 2004. Accessed June 7, 2011. "Bradley Beach is generally acknowledged as the first town to institute a beach badge system The town began requiring the badges in 1929."
  26. ^ Navarro, Mireya; and Nuwer, Rachel. "Resisted for Blocking the View, Dunes Prove They Blunt Storms", The New York Times, December 3, 2012. Accessed December 4, 2012. "Richard T. Bianchi Jr., public works supervisor in New Jersey’s Bradley Beach, said the town began building its 15-foot-high dune barrier along the mile-long waterfront in the 1990s by laying 25,000 feet of snow fencing in a saw-tooth pattern down the beach and later adding 20,000 recycled Christmas trees as traps for drifting sand. After wind pushed sand over the structure, shoots of dune grass were planted to further stabilize the barrier. When Hurricane Sandy came, the force of the waves flattened the dunes but left the town’s Boardwalk and the houses just 75 feet from it intact."
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed July 27, 2012.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed July 27, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed July 27, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Bradley Beach borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Bradley Beach borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Bradley Beach borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  34. ^ Act 46pages.pdf "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  35. ^ Borough Code, Borough of Bradley Beach, NJ. Accessed August 27, 2013. "SMALL MUNICIPALITY PLAN OF THE OPTIONAL MUNICIPAL CHARTER LAW: Chapter 465 of the Laws of the State of New Jersey of 1981, as amended and supplemented, pursuant to N.J.S.A. 40:69A-26 through 40A:69A-30; 40:69A-115 through 40:69A-117.3; 40:69A-120 through 40:69A-132; 40:69A-150; 40:69A-152; 40:69A-162 through 40:69A-167; 40:69A-168 through 40:69A-196; 40:69A-205 through 40:69A-210 and any and all general laws as therein defined which are or may be applicable to the Borough."
  36. ^ a b Borough Council, Borough of Bradley Beach. Accessed August 28, 2013. Note that the sources states that "The Borough of Bradley Beach, since July 1, 1992, has operated under the Mayor – Council form of government pursuant to the Faulkner Act, Chapter 69A of Title 40 of the New Jersey Statutes", though this conflicts with the Borough Code, which states that the Small Municipality form of government is used.
  37. ^ Borough Code § 5-2. Membership of Council; terms of office of Council and Mayor., Borough of Bradley Beach. Accessed October 29, 2013. "[Amended 12-30-2010 by Ord. No. 2010-15] The Council shall consist of the Mayor and four Councilpersons. Members of the Council shall be elected at large by the voters of the municipality on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, or such other day that the general election in November may be held as provided by law, in the years in which municipal officers are to be elected, and shall serve for a term of three years beginning on the first day of January next following their election. The Mayor shall be elected, however, for a term of four years beginning on the first day of January next following his or her election."
  38. ^ Ordinance 2010-15, Borough of Bradley Beach. Accessed October 29, 2013. "WHEREAS the Mayor and Council find that by changing the date of the election from May to November that they may achieve cost savings for the Borough and otherwise gain for the Borough the benefits and efficiencies associated with participating in the larger November general election process"
  39. ^ The Commission Form of Municipal Government, p. 53. Accessed August 10, 2007.
  40. ^ Mayor Engelstad, Borough of Bradley Beach. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  41. ^ Official Election Results - General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey Office of the Clerk. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  42. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  47. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  49. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  50. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  52. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  54. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  58. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  59. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  60. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  61. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  62. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  63. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  64. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  65. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  66. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  67. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  68. ^ Data for the Bradley Beach Elementary School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  69. ^ a b Mullen, Shannon; Shields, Nancy; and Matheson, Kathy. "Crime, school solutions costly as city seeks rebirth; High school improving, but not enough, many say", Asbury Park Press, January 27, 2005. Accessed August 28, 2013. "It was the day of the charter school's annual lottery, when names of applicants are drawn at random to fill the last remaining slots in next fall's freshman class.Academy Charter, now in its seventh year, is free to students in Asbury Park and the seven nearby towns that are sending districts for Asbury Park High School: Allenhurst, Avon, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Deal, Interlaken and Lake Como, formerly South Belmar."
  70. ^ Harris, Courtenay. "Personal attention is district's specialty", Asbury Park Press, March 29, 2000. Accessed August 28, 2013. "Several parents interviewed said they are uneasy about the fact that 98 percent of graduating eighth-graders have to go to Asbury Park High School, unless they get into a specialty school run by the Monmouth County Vocational School District. About 2 percent are allowed to go to Neptune High School."
  71. ^ About Us, Academy Charter High School. Accessed August 27, 2013. "Academy Charter High School is a free public high school for residents of Allenhurst, Asbury Park, Avon, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Deal, Interlaken, and Lake Como."
  72. ^ Career Academy Admissions, Monmouth County Vocational School District. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  73. ^ Bradley Beach station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  74. ^ North Jersey Coast Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  75. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  76. ^ TJ Lubinsky, WJRZ-FM. Accessed October 29, 2013. "A native of Bradley Beach, TJ Lubinsky spent his youth surrounded by the influences of his father, Herman Lubinsky Jr.; his uncle 'Buzzy,' a well-known Jersey Shore club DJ and drummer; and the memory of his grandfather, Herman Lubinsky Sr., who founded and operated WNJ-AM, New Jersey’s first radio station in Newark."
  77. ^ Chen, David W. "For Council Speaker, Home on Weekends Is at Jersey Shore", The New York Times, July 25, 2012. Accessed July 28, 2012. "Christine C. Quinn, the New York City Council speaker, in the weekend home in Bradley Beach, N.J., that she and her spouse, Kim M. Catullo, bought in 2004."
  78. ^ Pike, Helen-Chantal (2005). Asbury Park's Glory Days: The Story of an American Resort. Rutgers University Press, p. 152 ISBN 0-8135-3547-6 "One teenage clerk was Cesar Romero, who lived in nearby Bradley Beach."
  79. ^ "Along Pinball Way, Time, April 1, 1974. Accessed April 23, 2009. "A loner, Springsteen's lifestyle is music. 'I love traveling and performing, love being on the road. The thing I don't like is the business side.' Home is a rented apartment in Bradley Beach, N.J."
  80. ^ via Associated Press. "Thomas Vezzetti, 59, Hoboken Mayor, Dies", The New York Times, March 3, 1988. Accessed August 10, 2012. "Mr. Vezzetti was born in Bradley Beach, N.J., in 1928, along with a twin sister, Louise, who now lives in Puerto Rico."
  81. ^ Staff. "KAINAN BAY ARRIVAL; The Atka Failed to Reach the Plateau on First Day There", The New York Times, January 24, 1955. Accessed August 10, 2012. "The leader of the group was Maj. Murray A. Wiener, Air Force representative, whose home is Bradley Beach, N. J.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Ocean Grove
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Avon-by-the-Sea