Bradley Denton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Bradley Clayton Denton (born 1958) is an American science fiction author. He has also written other types of fiction, such as the black comedy of his novel Blackburn, about a sympathetic serial killer.

He was born in Towanda, Kansas, and attended the University of Kansas at Lawrence and graduated with degrees in astronomy (B.A.) and English (M.A.). His first published work was the short story "The Music of the Spheres," published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in March 1984. His collection The Calvin Coolidge Home for Dead Comedians and A Conflagration Artist won the 1995 World Fantasy Award for Best Collection.[1]

He moved from Kansas to Austin, Texas, with his wife Barbara in 1988.

Books[edit]


Short stories[edit]

  • "Blood Moccasins" (2013, Impossible Monsters edited by Kasey Lansdale, Subterranean Press)
  • "Blackburn and the Blade" (2006, Joe R. Lansdale's Lords of the Razor edited by Bill Sheehan and William Schafer, Subterranean Press; 2007 International Horror Guild nominee)
  • "Sergeant Chip" (September 2004, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, 2005 Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award winner)
  • "Timmy and Tommy's Thanksgiving Secret" (2003, in the collection Witpunk)
  • "Bloody Bunnies" (April 2000, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)
  • "We Love Lydia Love" (November 1994, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)
  • "The Territory" (July 1992 The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, a 1993 Hugo award and Nebula award nominee for best novella)
  • "The Sin-Eater of the Kaw" (June 1989, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)
  • "The Calvin Coolidge Home for Dead Comedians" (June 1988, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)
  • "In the Fullness of Time" (May 1986, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)
  • "The Summer We Saw Diana" (August 1985, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)
  • "Top of the Charts" (March 1985, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)
  • "The Music of the Spheres" (March 1984, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction)

References[edit]

  1. ^ World Fantasy Convention. "Award Winners and Nominees". Retrieved 4 Feb 2011. 

External links[edit]