Bradyrhizobiaceae

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Bradyrhizobiaceae
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Bacteria
Phylum: Proteobacteria
Class: Alphaproteobacteria
Order: Rhizobiales
Family: Bradyrhizobiaceae
Garrity et al. 2006
Genera[1]

Afipia
Agromonas
Balneimonas
Blastobacter
Bosea
Bradyrhizobium
Nitrobacter
Oligotropha
Photorhizobium
Rhodoblastus
Rhodopseudomonas
Salinarimonas

The Bradyrhizobiaceae are a family of bacteria, with ten genera. They include plant-associated bacteria such as Bradyrhizobium, a genus of rhizobia associated with some legumes. It also contains animal-associated bacteria such as Afipia felis, formerly thought to cause cat scratch disease. Others are free-living, such as Rhodopseudomonas, a purple bacterium found in marine water and soils. The strain Rhodopseudomonas palustris DX-1 can generate an electric current with no hydrogen production, a trait being explored in the development of the microbial fuel cell.[2] The genus Afipia has also been found in the atmosphere, where it uses methylsulfonylmethane as a carbon source.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature". Retrieved 20 July 2010. 
  2. ^ Defeng Xing, Yi Zuo, Shaoan Cheng, John M. Regan, and Bruce E. Logan (2008). "Electricity Generation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris DX-1". Environ. Sci. Technol. 42 (11): 4146. doi:10.1021/es800312v. PMID 18589979. 
  3. ^ Natasha DeLeon-Rodriguez, others (full list) (December 19, 2012 (received for review July 15, 2012)). "Microbiome of the upper troposphere: Species composition and prevalence, effects of tropical storms, and atmospheric implications". Retrieved March 1, 2014. "Based on the taxonomical classification of the SSU rRNA gene sequences recovered, Afipia sp. (Alphaproteobacteria) comprised over 50% of the total communities sampled off the California coast and during the transit flights. (...) This group [Afipia] is commonly found in aquatic environments and is known to use dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) as a sole carbon source. DMSO2 represents an intermediate of the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is commonly found in the marine atmosphere"  (page 3 and 5 of 6, quotes slightly edited).