Brahma from Mirpur-Khas

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Brahma from MIrpur Khas
Material Bronze/Copper
Size

Height: 95 cm
Width: 53 cm

Depth: 24 cm
Period/culture c. 5th or 6th century
Place Sindh, Pakistan
Present location Pakistan

The Brahma from Mirpur Khas is a famous bronze image of the Brahma made in Sindh, in modern Pakistan, dated to the 5th or 6th century, during the Gupta period.[1] It is the earliest known [2] metallic image of Lord Brahma and the only known representative if the school it represents.[3] It has been described as "an immense artistic creation" of the Gupta period.[4]

It was found in a field near Mirpur-Khas as first reported by Henry Cousens in 1929.[5][6] Some report it as having been found at Brahmanabad.[7]

Description[edit]

The four-headed Brahma bronze statue has a height over 3 feet. Lord Brahma is shown standing with two hands, wearing a dhoti and a yajnopavita but without any ornaments.[8]Vasudeva Sharana Agrawala calls it "an exceptionally good specimen of the art of metal-casting in this period".[9] Śrīrāma and Śaṅkara Goyala term is "true memorial of Gupta metalsmith's artistic genius".[10] It is said to the best example of Gupta art in Sindh.[11]

The object suggests that Sindh was a major center of metalworking.[12]

It used to be at the Karachi Museum, but it is reported that it is no longer there.[13]

Comparison with related art[edit]

Brahma from Mirpur Khas has been widely used by art historians for comparison with other artwork of historical significance.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Indian Art of the Gupta Age: From Pre-classical Roots to the Emergence of Medieval Trends, Editors Śrīrāma Goyala, Śaṅkara Goyala, Kusumanjali Book World, 2000, p. 85
  2. ^ Essays on Buddhist, Hindu, Jain Iconography & Epigraphy, Gouriswar Bhattacharya, International Centre for Study of Bengal Art, 2000, p. 236
  3. ^ , Early Brass Image of Bodhisattva, J.C. Harle, in South Asian Archaeology 1975: Papers from the Third International Conference of the Association of South Asian Archaeologists in Western Europe Held in Paris,J. E. Van Lohuizen-De Leeuw, BRILL, 1979 p. 134
  4. ^ Arts of Asia, Volume 4 Publisher Arts of Asia, 1974, p. 110, The immense artistic creation of the period was distinguished by the exercise of greater restraint, elegance of form and spiritual expression.
  5. ^ The Antiquities of Sind: With Historical Outline, Henry Cousens, Bhartiya Publishing House, 1929 - Sindh (Pakistan) p.10
  6. ^ Sind Quarterly, Volume 8, Contributor Shah Abdul Latif Cultural Society, Publisher Mazhar Yusuf, 1980, p.24 "absolutely magnificent brass image of Brahma (7i) from the neighbourhood of Mirpur Khas".
  7. ^ Five deities of Panchopasana, G. Bhattacharya, in Studies in Hindu and Buddhist Art edited by P. K. Mishra, p. 199-200
  8. ^ Indian Costume, Govind Sadashiv Ghurye, Popular Prakashan, 1966, Figure 100.
  9. ^ Indian Art - Volume 2, Vasudeva Sharana Agrawala, Prithivi Prakashan, 1977, Page 43
  10. ^ Indian Art of the Gupta Age: From Pre-classical Roots to the Emergence of Medieval Trends, Editors Śrīrāma Goyala, Śaṅkara Goyala, Kusumanjali Book World, 2000, p. 85
  11. ^ Vakataka - Gupta Age Circa 200-550 A.D., Ramesh Chandra Majumdar, Anant Sadashiv Altekar, Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1967, p. 435
  12. ^ Objects of Translation: Material Culture and Medieval "Hindu-Muslim" Encounter, Finbarr Barry Flood, Princeton University Press, 2009, p. 50
  13. ^ Indian Bronzes in the Salar Jung Museum, Salar Jung Museum, D. N. Varma, 1996, Page 2
  14. ^ South Asian Archaeology 1975: Papers from the Third International Conference of the Association of South Asian Archaeologists in Western Europe Held in Paris, J. E. Van Lohuizen-De Leeuw BRILL, 1979. The image of the Brahma from Mirpur Khas is on the cover. http://books.google.com/books?id=H2GW1PTHQ1YC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false