Braided fishing line

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Braided line was one of the of earliest types of fishing line, and in its modern incarnations it is still very popular in some situations because of its high knot strength, lack of stretch, and great overall power in relation to its diameter. Braids were originally made from natural fibers such as cotton and linen, but natural fiber braids (with the very rare exception of braided silk) have long since been replaced by braided or woven fibers of a man-made materials like Dacron, Spectra or micro-dyneema into a strand of line. Braided fishing lines tend to have good resistance to abrasion. Their actual breaking strength will commonly well exceed their pound-test rating.

One drawback of braided lines is that they are generally opaque in the water, and thus visible to fish. Hence, it is common to attach a monofilament at the end of the braided fishing line to serve as a leader and to reduce the high visibility of the braided fishing line.[1]

Braided lines, particularly the newer synthetics, can be successfully used on any type of fishing reel, but are perhaps most well known as excellent lines for bait casting reels, in particular for trolling where they remain especially popular among many fishermen.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Types of Fishing Lines