Brampton Assembly

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Brampton Assembly
Built 1985
Location Brampton, Ontario, Canada.
Coordinates 43°45′07″N 79°43′05″W / 43.752°N 79.718°W / 43.752; -79.718
Industry Automotive
Products Chrysler 300
Dodge Challenger
Dodge Charger
Employees 3,795 (3,633 hourly, 162 salaried) on two shifts[1]
Area 2,950,000 sq ft (274,000 m2)
Address 2000 Williams Parkway East
Brampton, Ontario, Canada

Brampton Assembly is a Chrysler automobile factory located at 9891 Torbram Rd Brampton, Ontario, Canada. Originally built by American Motors Corporation (AMC) for US$260 million, in what was then called Bramalea, Ontario township, the manufacturing plant was specially designed for building the Eagle Premier.

A previous American Motors Corporation facility also known as "Brampton Assembly" plant was located at Kennedy Road/Steeles Avenue, Brampton, ON. It was built and operated by American Motors and then Chrysler from 1961 to 1992. The plant assembled American Motors and Jeep vehicles until it was closed in 1992, torn down and replaced by a Lowe's store.

AMC's original Brampton plant[edit]

AMC Brampton Assembly Plant
Built 1960
Location Brampton, Ontario, Canada.
Coordinates 43°40′41″N 79°43′19″W / 43.678°N 79.722°W / 43.678; -79.722
Industry Automotive
Products Rambler American
Rambler Classic
AMC Rebel
AMC Hornet/Concord
AMC Gremlin/Spirit
AMC Eagle
Jeep CJ
Jeep Wrangler
Area 40 acres (16.2 ha)
Address Kennedy Road
Brampton, Ontario, Canada
Defunct 1992

The current Chrysler factory is not the same as a nearby American Motors (AMC) plant that shared the same name.

The fourth largest U.S. automaker built a new factory in Brampton at the northeast corner of Steeles Avenue and Kennedy Road as part of American Motors Canada, Inc. The facility opened on January 26, 1961, with an annual capacity of over 50,000 vehicles and employment of 1,100 hourly and 500 salaried workers.[2] The Rambler Classic was built on a line speed of 32 cars per shift.[3] The facility was soon producing 33,000 cars annually in Canada.[4] This assembly plant produced Rambler Americans, AMC Rebels, and later, Hornets, Concords, Gremlins, Spirits, and Eagles.

American Motors was in the best position of the U.S. automakers to take advantage of the Canada–United States Automotive Products Agreement.[5] This plant also allowed AMC to export cars within Commonwealth countries at a favorable tariff rate, making AMC the number one US nameplate in markets such as Trinidad and Jamaica in the 1960s.[6] The assembly of Ambassador models was moved to Kenosha, Wisconsin while production of Ramblers and Rebels increased. By 1969, the year of the introduction of the Hornet, the output of AMC's Brampton operation was destined to the eastern half of the continent while production at Kenosha supplied the western regions.[7]

In 1977, AMC hired the first female assembly worker and Cecilia Palmer became the Canadian Auto Workers Local 1285 first sister.[3]

In 1987, with the Chrysler buyout, the AMC division and its plants (Brampton and Bramalea) were absorbed into Chrysler, becoming part of Chrysler Canada Limited. The acquisition of AMC meant overcapacity for Chrysler, and AMC's old Kenosha and Toledo factories were on top of Chrysler's closure list.[8] The workers in Toledo agreed to concessions to keep the factory open, but by 1990, they were pitted against Brampton Assembly and additional concessions by the Toledo employees were crucial to Chrysler's decision to close Brampton.[8]

When the Jeep Wrangler production was moved to Toledo in 1992, the new Bramalea plant was renamed to Brampton Assembly.[9] The original AMC plant was closed on April 4, 1992[3] and sold to Wal-Mart for use as their Canadian warehouse.

The remains of the plant were torn down in 2005, and the land was put to other uses. Among the buildings on the site is a Lowe's home improvement store that opened on December 10, 2007, as one of the first three to be established by the retail chain in Canada.[10]

Annual production[edit]

1961 Rambler Classic
1963 Rambler Classic
1966 Rambler American
1970 AMC Hornet
1974 AMC Hornet hatchback
1979 AMC Spirit AMX
1987 AMC Eagle
Jeep Wrangler (YJ)

American Motors' original Brampton production and products from 1961 to 1992:[11]

Year Model Units Yearly totals
1961 Rambler Classic 4,168 4,168
1962 Rambler American 5,050
Rambler Classic 12,297 17,347
1963 Rambler American 5,308
Rambler Classic 18,941
Rambler Ambassador 3,242 27,491
1964 Rambler American 11,860
Rambler Classic 19,247
Rambler Ambassador 1,877 32,984
1965 Rambler American 9,391
Rambler Classic 18,264
Rambler Ambassador 6,893 34,548
1966 Rambler American 9,314
Rambler Classic 11,606
AMC Ambassador 7,852 28,772
1967 Rambler American 5,434
AMC Rebel 15,836
AMC Ambassador 10,125 31,395
1968 Rambler American 25,296
AMC Rebel 9,718
AMC Ambassador 6,413 41,427
1969 American 24,185
AMC Rebel 15,529 38,714
1970 AMC Hornet 36,408
AMC Gremlin 3,260
AMC Rebel 3,581 43,249
1971 AMC Hornet 17,666
AMC Gremlin 23,428 41,094
1972 AMC Hornet 18,650
AMC Gremlin 33,091 57,741
1973 AMC Hornet 32,331
AMC Gremlin 37,663 69,994
1974 AMC Hornet 43,150
AMC Gremlin 39,223 82,373
1975 AMC Hornet 21,848
AMC Gremlin 10,163 32,011
1976 AMC Hornet 35,204
AMC Gremlin 14,422 49,626
1977 AMC Hornet 21,218
AMC Gremlin 19,166 40,284
1978 AMC Concord 41,017
AMC Gremlin 4,211 45,228
1979 Jeep CJ-5 20,913
Jeep CJ-7 30,684 51,597
1980 Jeep CJ-5 12,050
Jeep CJ-7 17,993 30,043
1981 AMC Concord 10,441
AMC Eagle 10,347 20,788
1982 AMC Concord 10,117
AMC Eagle 20,900 31,017
1983 AMC Concord 14,277
AMC Spirit 1,689
AMC Eagle 10,424
AMC Eagle SX/4 5,398 31,788
1984 AMC Eagle 25,535
AMC Eagle SX/4 1 25,536
1985 AMC Eagle 16,866 16,866
1986 AMC Eagle 8,217 8,217
1987 AMC Eagle 4,996
Jeep Wrangler 44,517 49,513
1988 Eagle Wagon 2,305
Jeep Wrangler 46,130 48,435
1989 Jeep Wrangler 71,025 71,025
1990 Jeep Wrangler 57,451 57,451
1991 Jeep Wrangler 57,241 57,241
1992 Jeep Wrangler 82,015 82,015
1961-1992 Grand total 1,280,078

History[edit]

In June 1984, American Motors Corporation (AMC) established an agreement with the governments of Ontario and Canada to build a new assembly plant.[12] Both the national and provincial governments loaned AMC C$100 million each to build the C$764 million facility.[12] The agreement also included a royalty to the governments equal to 1% of the sales price of every vehicle produced at the facility.[12]

The infrastructure builder EllisDon Construction completed the US$260 million (US$590,204,997 in 2014 dollars [13]) plant and associated buildings.[14] The factory was opened by AMC in 1986 as Bramalea Assembly, a state-of-the-art robotics-based assembly facility with 2,950,000 square feet (274,000 m2) of floor space located on 269 acres (108.9 ha) specifically designed to produce the Eagle Premier.

The production line speed was initially about 400 cars per shift (54 jobs per hour) with only one shift scheduled.[3] There were frequent layoffs at this new factory while AMC's old Brampton plant located at Kennedy Road worked steady producing Jeep Wranglers.[3]

This facility was acquired (along with the rest of AMC) by Chrysler in August 1987. The factory was ranked tops in Chrysler's 1988 quality audit of the cars produced in each of automaker's plants.[12]

Production of the Chrysler LH platform cars began in June 1992 and continued with the updated LH cars in 1997. Production switched to the rear-wheel drive Chrysler LX platform cars in January 2004.

The attached Brampton Satellite Stamping, which opened in 1991, was built for the launch of the Chrysler LH platform.

At that time, Brampton Assembly operated with three shifts of production. It is the city of Brampton's largest employer, with over 4,200 people working there.

On 19 July 2007, Chrysler Group announced an investment of US$1.2 billion in the Brampton plant for upgrades to the Chrysler 300 series, Dodge Magnum, and Dodge Charger, as well as a $500 million manufacturing investment to prepare for European-market LX platform product loading.[15]

On 16 August 2007, the one-millionth LX rear-wheel-drive vehicle platform rolled-off Brampton Assembly's production line.[16]

On 1 November 2007, Chrysler LLC announced that it was ending the third shift in Brampton with the loss of 1,000 direct jobs as well as declaring that production of the Dodge Magnum in Brampton will end in early 2008.[17]

On 1 May 2009, both the Brampton Assembly and Windsor Assembly plants were shut down as a result of Chrysler's bankruptcy protection filing on 30 April 2009, in the United States, affecting about 2,700 employees at the Brampton Assembly and 4,400 at the Windsor Assembly. A Chrysler parts plant in Etobicoke, Toronto operated until 10 May 2009, when it was closed down for 30 to 60 days, affecting 300 employees, while it went through restructuring under court-ordered creditor protection.[18]

After the reorganization, Chrysler announced the launch of new models of the 300 and Charger to be produced in the Brampton assembly plant, beginning in 2010.[19] The factory began production of the redesigned 2011 Chrysler 300 in January 2011. At this time, total employment was 2,871 (2,733 hourly; 138 salaried) working two shifts.[20]

In 2012, employees at the Chrysler factories in Windsor and Brampton, Ontario ratified the CAW’s labor agreement by an overwhelming majority, without any information from the automaker about plans for new products or investment at either plant.[21] As of December 2012, the Brampton Assembly Plant is the single largest employer in Canada's 11th largest city.[22]

Products[edit]

1996 Chrysler Concorde
Dodge Magnum

Annual production[edit]

  • 1988 = 59,068
  • 1989 = 33,904
  • 1990 = 24,676
  • 1991 = 18,133
  • 1992 = 50,660
  • 1993 = 256,754
  • 1994 = 256,211
  • 1995 = 188,782
  • 1996 = 238,965
  • 1997 = 204,137
  • 1998 = 300,866
  • 1999 = 338,921
  • 2000 = 291,884
  • 2001 = 198,965
  • 2002 = 201,723
  • 2003 = 140,642
  • 2004 = 209,045
  • 2005 = 318,536
  • 2006 = 314,161
  • 2007 = 273,285
  • 2008 = 210,704
  • 2009 = 121,715 (Bankruptcy Year)
  • 2010 = 163,257
  • 2011 = 194,631
  • 2012 = 240,193
  • 2013 = 244,771

Total production through 2013 = 5,094,589

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Fact Sheet: Brampton Assembly Plant and Brampton Satellite Stamping Plant". Chrysler Corporate. January 2013. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "The Hatchery Section II Vehicle Production at the American Motors Corporation". AMC Eagle Nest. p. 10. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "The History of Bramptons Largest Union Local". Canadian Auto Workers Local 1285. 18 May 2008. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  4. ^ Anastakis, Dimitry (2005). Auto pact: creating a borderless North American auto industry, 1960-1971. University of Toronto Press. p. 125. ISBN 978-0-8020-3821-0. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  5. ^ Anastakis, p. 128.
  6. ^ Billeter, Vera (1965), "The American Motors Story", in Logoz, Arthur, Auto-Universum 1966 (English edition) (Zürich, Switzerland: Verlag International Automobile Parade) IX: 18 
  7. ^ Anastakis, pp. 128-129.
  8. ^ a b Phelps, Nicholas A.; Raines, Philip (2003). The New Competition for Inward Investment: Companies, Institutionsmand Territorial Development. Edward Elgar Publishing. p. 102. ISBN 9781781956984. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  9. ^ "Brampton, Ontario Chrysler plants". allpar.com. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  10. ^ "Lowe's expands internationally, opens first Canadian stores". Groupe CNW. 10 December 2007. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  11. ^ Dr. Rambler (October 2009). "Brampton production figures according to Plant Tour Brochure". Geocities. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  12. ^ a b c d Rubenstein, James M. (1992). The changing US auto industry: a geographical analysis. Taylor & Francis. p. 264. ISBN 978-0-415-05544-4. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  13. ^ Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  14. ^ "Chrysler Corporation Assembly Plant AMC". EllisDon Corporation. Archived from the original on 17 September 2008. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  15. ^ "Chrysler Group to invest $1.2 bln in Brampton assembly plant". Reuters. 19 July 2007. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  16. ^ "Brampton sets production milestone". Wheels Canada. 16 August 2007. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  17. ^ "Chrysler Brampton Assembly Plant Job Cuts". The Brampton News. 1 November 2007. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  18. ^ "Chrysler Canada assembly plants shut down". CBC.ca. 1 May 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  19. ^ "New Chrysler Business Plan Promising News for Canadian Workers, CAW President says". Canadian Auto Workers. 4 November 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  20. ^ Fact Sheet: Brampton Assembly Plant and Brampton Satellite Stamping Plant, Chrysler Corporate, January 2011 
  21. ^ Kreindler, Derek (1 October 2012). "CAW Workers Ratify Chrysler Agreement As The Countdown To 2016 Begins". The Truth About Cars. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  22. ^ "Units". Canadian Auto Workers Local 1285. 14 December 2012. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 

External links[edit]