Branchville, New Jersey

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Branchville, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Branchville
Map of Branchville in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Map of Branchville in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Branchville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Branchville, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°08′50″N 74°44′57″W / 41.147239°N 74.749033°W / 41.147239; -74.749033Coordinates: 41°08′50″N 74°44′57″W / 41.147239°N 74.749033°W / 41.147239; -74.749033[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Sussex
Incorporated March 9, 1898
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Anthony Frato, Sr. (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Kathryn L. Leissler[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 0.600 sq mi (1.553 km2)
 • Land 0.593 sq mi (1.535 km2)
 • Water 0.007 sq mi (0.018 km2)  1.15%
Area rank 542nd of 566 in state
24th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 554 ft (169 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 841
 • Estimate (2013[10]) 821
 • Rank 542nd of 566 in state
22nd of 24 in county[11]
 • Density 1,419.2/sq mi (548.0/km2)
 • Density rank 340th of 566 in state
5th of 24 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07826, 07827, 07890[12][13]
Area code(s) 862/973[14]
FIPS code 3403707300[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 885168[1][17]
Website None
For the former name of the unincorporated community in Somerset County, see South Branch, New Jersey

Branchville is a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 841,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 4 (-0.5%) from the 845 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 6 (-0.7%) from the 851 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] The borough is located in the northernmost region of Sussex County.

Branchville was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 9, 1898, from portions of Frankford Township. An additional portion of Frankford Township was annexed as of March 1, 1951.[19]

History[edit]

Branchville Station of the Sussex Railroad in 1917

Branchville was established by settlers from Connecticut in the 18th century. It grew quickly and in the 1820s the town was divided into building lots. By the year 1844, Branchville was a well-established community with 32 dwellings, mills, blacksmiths, an academy, a church and a variety of other factories and businesses.

The addition of two water-powered mills and a dam in 1855 furthered the town's prosperity. Energy would later be harnessed from this dam and a second one that was built to supply Branchville with electricity and its own power company.

Extension of rail service to Branchville in 1869 brought an even greater boon to the village's economic market growth. From 1869-1871 forty new homes were built. The railroad had made it possible to ship products from the local mills and creameries to larger urban areas to the east. With lake communities nearby the tourism was also spurred by the railroad. Up to six trains a day would bring people from the larger cities to enjoy a country vacation.

Geography[edit]

Branchville is located at 41°08′50″N 74°44′57″W / 41.147239°N 74.749033°W / 41.147239; -74.749033 (41.147239,-74.749033). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.600 square miles (1.553 km2), of which, 0.593 square miles (1.535 km2) of it was land and 0.007 square miles (0.018 km2) of it (1.15%) was water.[1][2]

Climate[edit]

This climatic region is typified by large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot (and often humid) summers and cold (sometimes severely cold) winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Branchville has a humid continental climate, abbreviated "Dfb" on climate maps.[20]

Geology[edit]

Branchville is on the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation. This is a shale, slate, and limestone formation created 450 million years ago when a chain of volcanic islands collided with proto North America. The islands went over the North American Plate, creating the Highlands of Sussex County and the Kittatinny Valley. Millions of years of erosion occurred and there was a second event. About 400 million years ago a small continent that was long and thin, collided with proto North America creating folding and faulting. The Silurian Shawangunk conglomerate that was under a shallow sea, lifted due to pressure. The pressure created heat which melted the silica and bonded the quartz and conglomerate together, creating Kittatinny Mountain.

The Wisconsin Glacier covered all of Branchville from 21,000 BC to 13,000 BC, covering the top of Kittatinny Mountain. End moraines exist in Stokes State Forest, another just off Route 565 north of the Skylands Park and one about a mile south of Ross's Corner. An esker was created when the glacier retreated due to climate warming. Many ponds and lakes created. Culver Lake was created at this time, as the drainage became blocked. Branchville is drained by Culver's Lake Creek and Dry brook. Dry Creek starts at the Branchville Reservoir, travels south, enters into Culver's Creek in Branchville and eventually empties into the Paulinskill. There is a chain of hills between Dry Creek and Papakatin Creek. These hills are what separate the Paulinskill River drainage system from that of the Wallkill. The drainage divide is just north of Route 206 and the goes northwest toward Branchville Reservoir. Water near Route 206 or south of Route 206 drains into the Paulinskill. Water north of Route 206 drains into the Wallkill River.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 526
1910 663 26.0%
1920 588 −11.3%
1930 665 13.1%
1940 715 7.5%
1950 810 13.3%
1960 963 18.9%
1970 911 −5.4%
1980 870 −4.5%
1990 851 −2.2%
2000 845 −0.7%
2010 841 −0.5%
Est. 2013 821 [10] −2.4%
Population sources: 1900-1920[21]
1900-1910[22] 1910-1930[23]
1930-1990[24] 2000[25][26] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 841 people, 364 households, and 220.9 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,419.2 per square mile (548.0/km2). There were 386 housing units at an average density of 651.4 per square mile (251.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.43% (811) White, 0.36% (3) Black or African American, 0.36% (3) Native American, 1.07% (9) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.48% (4) from other races, and 1.31% (11) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.92% (33) of the population.[7]

There were 364 households, of which 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.2% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.3% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.98.[7]

In the borough, 22.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 23.3% from 25 to 44, 29.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.8 years. For every 100 females there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $56,875 (with a margin of error of +/- $29,887) and the median family income was $84,643 (+/- $16,892). Males had a median income of $61,042 (+/- $20,432) versus $37,955 (+/- $6,402) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,851 (+/- $4,509). About 2.6% of families and 2.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.8% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.[27]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 845 people, 354 households, and 225 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,421.6 people per square mile (553.0/km2). There were 377 housing units at an average density of 634.3 per square mile (246.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 100.00% White, 0.12% African American, 0.36% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.12% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.30% of the population.[25][26]

There were 354 households out of which 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.4% were non-families. 32.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.03.[25][26]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 87.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.4 males.[25][26]

The median income for a household in the borough was $45,855, and the median income for a family was $60,909. Males had a median income of $36,250 versus $27,159 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $22,748. About 4.2% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.[25][26]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Branchville is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Branchville Borough is Anthony Frato, Sr. (R, term ends December 31, 2015). Members of the Branchville Borough Council are William R. Bathgate (R, 2014), H. Lee Doremus (R, 2016), David Wayne Howell (R, 2015), Frank J. San Phillip (R, 2015), Richard N. VanStone (R, 2016) and Mary C. Whitesell (R, 2014).[4][28][29][30]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Branchville is located in the 5th Congressional District[31] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[8][32][33]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[34] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[35][36] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[37][38]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[39][40] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[41] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[42]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[43] As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),[44] Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),[45] Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[46] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016)[47] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[48][43] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[49] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),[50] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016)[51] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[52][49] The County Administrator is John Eskilson.[53][54]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 556 registered voters in Branchville, of which 75 (13.5% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 306 (55.0% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 175 (31.5% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[55] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 66.1% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 85.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[55][56]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 259 votes here (61.4% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 156 votes (37.0% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 7 votes (1.7% vs. 2.1%), among the 422 ballots cast by the borough's 583 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.4% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[57] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 253 votes here (60.4% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 159 votes (37.9% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 4 votes (1.0% vs. 1.5%), among the 419 ballots cast by the borough's 578 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.5% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[58] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 277 votes here (65.5% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 137 votes (32.4% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 7 votes (1.7% vs. 1.3%), among the 423 ballots cast by the borough's 546 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.5% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[59]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 199 votes here (68.6% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 55 votes (19.0% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 32 votes (11.0% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 4 votes (1.4% vs. 1.3%), among the 290 ballots cast by the borough's 542 registered voters, yielding a 53.5% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[60]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Frankford Township School District, located in Branchville, as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[61] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 565 students and 61.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.23:1.[62]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend High Point Regional High School, located in Wantage Township. Attending the school are students from Branchville, Frankford Township, Lafayette Township, Sussex Borough and from Wantage Township.[63] The school had an enrollment of 1,087 as of the 2011-12 school year.[64]

Transportation[edit]

The township had a total of 96.23 miles (154.87 km) of roadways, of which 60.37 miles (97.16 km) are maintained by the municipality, 30.21 miles (48.62 km) by Sussex County and 5.65 miles (9.09 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[65]

Economy[edit]

Selective Insurance, a regional insurance holding company that provides property and casualty insurance products and insurance services.[66]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Branchville Borough, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed August 14, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Branchville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Branchville borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Branchville borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Branchville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Branchville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 27, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 229. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  20. ^ Climate Summary for Branchville, New Jersey
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  22. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  23. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  24. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  25. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Branchville borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  26. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Branchville borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  27. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Branchville borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  28. ^ County Election Summary - General election November 2, 2010, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 8, 2010. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  29. ^ Summary Report - Group detail / General Election November 8, 2011, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 10, 2011. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  30. ^ County Summary With Detail - General Election: November 6, 2012, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  31. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  35. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  36. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  37. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  38. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  39. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  40. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  41. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  42. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ a b Sussex County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  44. ^ Richard A. Vohden, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  45. ^ Dennis J. Mudrick, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  46. ^ Phillip R. Crabb, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  47. ^ George Graham, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  48. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  49. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
  50. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Clerk's Office. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  51. ^ Sheriff's Office, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  52. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Surrogate. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  53. ^ County Administrator, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  54. ^ Sussex County Official Directory 2014, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  56. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  57. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 19, 2013.
  58. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  59. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  60. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  61. ^ Lamonte, Rosalie S. Report on Non-Operating School District: Branchville, New Jersey Department of Education, June 30, 2009. Accessed October 9, 2009.
  62. ^ District information for Frankford Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 14, 2014.
  63. ^ High Point Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 14, 2014. "High Point Regional High School is a comprehensive high school serving the diversified needs of the three surrounding K through 8 school districts of Lafayette, Frankford, and Sussex-Wantage."
  64. ^ Data for High Point Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 14, 2014.
  65. ^ Sussex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 24, 2014.
  66. ^ History, Selective Insurance. Accessed February 18, 2013. "1991 - Selective, now the largest employer in its home county of NJ, opens its new corporate headquarters on the Branchville site."

External links[edit]