BreakThru (video game)

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This article is about the video game. For Windows puzzle video game, see BreakThru! (video game).
Breakthru
U.S. arcade flyer of BreakThru.
U.S. arcade flyer of Breakthru.
Developer(s) Data East
Publisher(s) Data East, U.S. Gold Ltd.
Platform(s) Arcade, Amstrad CPC, NES, ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64
Release date(s) 1986
Genre(s) Vehicular combat
Mode(s) Single-player

BreakThru (ブレーク スルー Bureikusurū?) is a Data East vehicular combat arcade game that was later made available for the Nintendo Entertainment System. The goal is to drive a dune buggy to "breakthru" the enemy lines of five different areas. The five areas are "Mountain", "Bridge", "Prairie" (Although early advertising labeled it "Jungle"), "City", and "Recover the Aircraft".

Storyline[edit]

Arcade screenshot of BreakThru.

Secret fighter plane PK430 has been stolen from your country, and it is up to you to get it back. You will drive a buggy equipped with a gun and "BreakThru" five different enemy strongholds. On your way you will encounter obstacles such as land mines, rocks, soldiers, jeeps, flamethrowers, tanks, trucks, armored vehicles, and helicopters.

Extra lives can be found, as well as a powerup that gives the player a temporary three-way cannon.

Upon completing the final level, after the ending sequence is shown, the player continues the game, but is prompted to select one of the levels to start at. The final win condition of this game is completing the final level a second time (no matter where he or she starts from). When this is accomplished, the game ends.

Bugs[edit]

The ZX Spectrum conversion of the game contained a bug which made it possible to get through the entire game simply by holding down the jump button. The player was able to reach the end of the game without being damaged by enemies or terrain, however no points could be scored by playing the game this way.[1]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Playing tips". Crash magazine, issue 36. Retrieved 1 May 2011.