Brent Noon

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Noon at the UTEP Sierra Medical invitational meet, 1994.

Brent Noon (born August 29, 1971) is an inactive American Track and Field athlete, known primarily for throwing the Shot Put.

While competing for Fallbrook Union High School, Noon recorded the second best marks in the shot put, the closest approach to Michael Carter's NFHS record.[1] Noon's 1989 mark of 76'2" is still the current California High School record[2] After taking a year off, he continued on to the University of Georgia where he won three straight NCAA Men's Outdoor Track and Field Championships. The University elected Noon to its "Circle of Honor" in 2009 [3]

Noon won the 1995 USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships[4] allowing Noon to compete for the United States at the 1995 World Championships in Athletics, where he finished 5th behind American teammates John Godina and Randy Barnes. Barnes is the current world record holder in the shot put and was a mentor to the younger Noon, residing with the Noon family while visiting California training for the Jack in the Box Invitational meet where he ultimately set the record.[5]

In 1992, Noon failed to show up at a USATF mandated drug test. For the offense of missing the test, he was suspended from competition for a 5 week period just before the Olympic Trials. Noon claimed the instructions were sent to his California address, even though he had moved to Georgia. While the suspension was reversed, Noon finished 9th at the trials and failed to make the Olympic team. He blamed mental anguish. In 1994, Noon won a $1 Million lawsuit against USATF.[6] He also settled a civil defamation suit against UCLA and then assistant coach Art Venegas, who he claimed had spread rumors of Noon's steroid abuse prior to his high school performances. It was claimed the year off was related to an attempt to evade drug testing.[7]

In 1996 another drug test revealed methandieone in Noon's sample and in 1997 he was banned from competition for four years, backdated to the 1996 test date.[8]

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