Brian Barber

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Brian Barber
Starting pitcher
Born: (1973-03-04) March 4, 1973 (age 41)
Hamilton, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 12, 1995 for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
August 1, 1999 for the Kansas City Royals
Career statistics
Win–loss record 5–8
Earned run average 6.77
Strikeouts 59
Teams

Brian Scott Barber (born March 4, 1973) is a former Major League Baseball starting pitcher. He was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the first round of the 1991 amateur draft, and was later signed to a minor league contract. He batted and threw right-handed during his career.

Major league baseball career[edit]

Barber made his major league debut on August 12, 1995 with the Cardinals at age 22, making him the youngest player on the team.[1] On that day, Barber pitched four innings, giving up three earned runs.[2] He had a record of 2–1 and 5.22 earned run average.[3] The following year, he pitched in only 3 innings, with an ERA of 15.00. Following the 1996 season, Barber found himself unhappy with the Cardinals, and on December 21, 1996, he was granted free agency. Two weeks later, he was signed by the Kansas City Royals. Barber missed the entire 1997 season in the minors. In 1998, Barber reemerged, pitching in 42 innings. His ERA was, however, 6.00. He also recorded a record of 2–4. The following year, Barber pitched in only 18.2 innings, with an ERA of 9.64, and a record of 1–3. On October 4, 1999, Barber was granted free agency again. About two months later, he was picked up by the Cleveland Indians. However, Barber would not pitch in an Indians uniform, as he retired.

At the time of his retirement Barber had a 5–8 record, a 6.77 ERA, 45 walks, and 59 strikeouts. Barber was 1 for 8 hitting, with a lifetime batting average of .125. His lifetime fielding percentage was 1.000.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1995 St. Louis Cardinals". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2008-10-11. 
  2. ^ "Aug 12, 1995, Cardinals at Padres Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2008-10-11. 
  3. ^ "Brian Barber". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2008-10-11. 

External links[edit]