Brian Catling

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Brian Catling (born in London, 1948) is an English sculptor, poet, novelist, film maker and performance artist.[1] He was educated at North East London Polytechnic and the Royal College of Art.[2] He now holds the post of Professor of Fine Art at The Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford and is a fellow of Linacre College.[3] He has been exhibiting his work internationally since the 1970s.[4] Some of his most notable works and performances include: Quill Two at Matt’s Gallery, Dilston Grove in 2011,[5] Antix at Matt’s Gallery in 2006,[6] a commissoned memorial to the Site of Execution, Tower of London in 2007,[7] Vanished! A Video Seance made with screenwriter Tony Grisoni in 1999[8] and Cyclops at South London Gallery 1996.[9]

In 2001 he co founded the international performance collective WitW.[10]

As a writer he has published poetic works, including one compendium, A Court of Miracles, in 2009. His first prose book Bobby Awl was published in 2007. Currently he is writing novels and has completed The Vorrh trilogy.

The Vorrh[edit]

The first title of The Vorrh trilogy was published in 2012 and features a foreword by acclaimed comic-book writer Alan Moore.[11] Taking inspiration from the imaginary forest of the same name in Raymond Roussel’s Impressions of Africa the Vorrh is the backdrop to an epic fantasy/surrealist narrative led by hunter Tsungali and the Cyclops, Ishmael. Also appearing in The Vorrh are real-life figures Eadweard Muybridge and Raymond Roussel.[12]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

  • 2011 Quill Two Matt’s Gallery at Dilston Grove
  • 2010 Bluecoat Gallery Liverpool bienalle
  • 2008 Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh. Scotland
  • 2006 Antix. Matt’s Gallery. London. 16 night Performance installation
  • 2002 Antic (Norwegian version) Video installation. Trans-Art Gallery Trondheim. Norway
  • 2002 Buhl Cyclops. Vidio installation. AKW. Stadt Buhl. Germany
  • 2000 Man In the Moon. Galleri e.s. Bergen
  • 1999 Were : The Chamber works, ICA, London
  • 1998 Were, durational performance, Matt's Gallery, London
  • 1997 Cyclops (video installation in German language), Project Gallery, Leipzig
  • 1997 Country of the Blind, text, drawings & video, The Economist, London
  • 1997 Nordic Cyclops (video installation), Museet for Samtidskunst, Oslo
  • 1996 Cyclops (video installation), South London Gallery
  • 1995 Cyclops, Galerie Satellite, Paris
  • 1994 The Blindings, Serpentine Gallery, London
  • 1993 Ten Gallery, Fukuoka, Japan
  • 1993 La Bas, Galerie Satellite, Paris
  • 1991 At The Lighthouse, Matt's Gallery, London
  • 1989 Museum of Modern Art, Oxford
  • 1988 Atrium, Neuw Gallery, Sammalung Ludwig, Aachen, Germany
  • 1987 White Breath / Red Heart, Hordaland Kunstnercentrum, Bergen, Norway
  • 1987 Lair, Matt's Gallery, London
  • 1986 On Touching And Haunting A Noble Silent Room, Leifsgade 22, Copenhagen

Publications[edit]

Poetry

  • A Court of Miracles (2009)
  • Thyhand (2001)
  • Large Ghost (2001)
  • Late Harping (2001)
  • The Blindings (1995)
  • The Stumbling Block (1990)

Fiction

  • Bobby Awl (2007)

Anthologies

  • Twentieth- Century British and Irish Poetry(2001)
  • Vanishing Points (2004)
  • Pittancer (2002)
  • Conductors Of Chaos (1996)
  • The New British Poetry (1992)
  • Future Exiles (1992)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brian Catling". Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Perril, Simon (2001). Tending the Vortex. CCCP Books. p. 6. ISBN 978-0953998623. 
  3. ^ "The Ruskin School University of Oxford". Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Fox, Dan. "Brian Catling Review". Frieze Magazine. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  5. ^ Milnes, Laura. "The "Art" formerly known as "Performance"". Arts Admin. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Matt's Gallery". Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  7. ^ Moss, Richard. "Tower of London Unveils Memorial to the Executed". Culture 24. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  8. ^ Romney, Jonathan (27 October 1999). "Scarier than Blair Witch". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  9. ^ Hunt, Ian. "Brian Catling Review". Frieze Magazine. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  10. ^ "Brian Catling". European Live Art Archive. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  11. ^ "The Vorrh - B. Catling". Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  12. ^ "B. Catling on 'The Vorrh', Alan Moore, J.R.R Tolkien and More". Retrieved 6 November 2012. 

External links[edit]