Brian Easton (economist)

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This article is about the New Zealand economist. For the Scottish footballer, see Brian Easton (footballer).

Brian Easton (born 1943) is an economist from New Zealand. He has been economics columnist for the New Zealand Listener magazine for more than 34 years, giving him a high public profile nationally. He has held a number of university teaching posts and also works as an independent commentator.[1] Easton is known for his criticism of economic orthodoxy.

Background[edit]

Easton was born in 1943 and grew up in Christchurch, New Zealand. He holds degrees in mathematics and economics from the University of Canterbury, and in economics from Victoria University of Wellington.

Career[edit]

Easton was director of the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research from 1981 to 1986.[2] He is a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, a Chartered Statistician, and a Member of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Publication[edit]

As author, co-author or editor of more than 30 books, Easton writes regularly for the NZ Listener[3] and other journals and newspapers. His recent books include Globalisation and the Wealth of Nations (Auckland University Press, 2007), The Commercialisation of New Zealand (AUP, 1997), In Stormy Seas: The Post-War New Zealand Economy (UOP, 1997), The Whimpering of the State: Policy after MMP (AUP, 1999)[4] and The Nationbuilders (AUP, 2001). He was included in Speaking Truth to Power: Public Intellectuals Rethink New Zealand,[5] edited by Laurence Simmons (AUP, 2007).

Academia[edit]

Easton has held a number of scholarships and fellowships including visiting fellowships at the University of Melbourne, as Richard Downing Research Professor, Georgetown and Harvard Universities, as a Fulbright NZ Distinguished Visiting Fellow[6] and a Marsden Fellowship[7] (2003–2006). In 2002 he was appointed to the New Zealand Prime Minister’s Growth and Innovation Advisory Board[8] and, in 2005, he was made a Distinguished Fellow of the New Zealand Association of Economists.[2] He has documented his current work activity and interests in his personal web site.[1]

References[edit]