Brian Pink

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Brian Pink
Australian Statistician
Incumbent
Assumed office
5 March 2007 (2007-03-05)
Personal details
Nationality Australian
Spouse(s) Sandra (first)

Elizabeth (second)[1]

Children Two[1]
Occupation Public servant

Brian Pink has been the Australian Statistician, the head of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), since 5 March 2007.[2]

Prior to September 1999, Brian Pink was ABS's Statistical Support Group Manager, when he was appointed as the Government Statistician for New Zealand and Chief Executive of Statistics New Zealand.[3]

Biography[edit]

Pink's career in official statistics began in Australia with the then Commonwealth Bureau of Census and Statistics in Sydney in 1966, followed by postings to various state offices of its successor, the Australian Bureau of Statistics. He was Government Statistician and Chief Executive of Statistics New Zealand from late October 2000 to March 2007.

As well as his duties as ex officio member of the Australian Statistics Advisory Council, Pink is Vice Chairman of the OECD Committee on Statistics, and Australia's Head of Delegation to the United Nations Statistical Commission. He was President of the International Association for Official Statistics from 2005 to 2007.

Brian Pink professes strong views about the importance of the role of official statistics in society, beyond necessary government use.[4]

Controversy[edit]

Brian Pink has been involved in a number of controversies relating to employees of the ABS.

Bulletin[edit]

In April 2008, the distribution of a staff bulletin by union employees led Brian Pink to issue a letter which advised employees that continued distribution of bulletins would be in breach of the Australian Public Service Code of Conduct. This led to Federal Court action[5][6][7] which was settled in mediation.[8]

Sackings[edit]

In April 2009, the ABS was taken to the Australian Industrial Relations Commission by the Community and Public Sector Union for the manner in which staff were terminated,[9][10] which resulted in a decision against the ABS.[11][12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Martin, Peter (16 June 2012). "The man who's got your number". The Sydney Morning Herald (Fairfax Media). Archived from the original on 21 September 2012. 
  2. ^ "Appointment of Australian Statistician". Press Release, Treasurer of Australia. 2006-12-13. Retrieved 2007-01-12. 
  3. ^ "Appointment Reflects High Esteem For ABS and Good NZ Relationship, Says Australian Statistician". Press Release, Australian Bureau of Statistics. 1999-09-05. Retrieved 2007-01-31. 
  4. ^ http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/d3310114.nsf/4a256353001af3ed4b2562bb00121564/82e3e8035097724aca25729e007c18de!OpenDocument
  5. ^ "CPSU, The Community And Public Sector Union v Commonwealth of Australia". Federal Court of Australia. 2008-05-09. 
  6. ^ "Access case begins, as CPSU pushes for end to Howard-era IR in APS". Community and Public Sector Union. 2008-06-04. 
  7. ^ Gordon, Josh (2008-06-08). "Bitter dispute will put Rudd's IR laws to test". The Age (Melbourne). 
  8. ^ "Towards a new relationship at ABS". Community and Public Sector Union. 2008-08-07. 
  9. ^ "ABS in court for 'illegal' sackings". The Canberra Times. 2009-04-23. 
  10. ^ "ABS illegally sacking staff: union". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 23 April 2009. Archived from the original on 17 February 2010. 
  11. ^ "CPSU, the Community and Public Sector Union-PSU Group v Australian Bureau of Statistics (C2009/2429)". Australian Industrial Relations Commission. 2009-05-05. 
  12. ^ Donovan, Samantha (6 May 2009). "ABS ordered to stop job cuts". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 13 November 2012. 
  13. ^ "ABS fails to stop employees going back to work". Community and Public Sector Union. 15 May 2009. 
Preceded by
Len Cook
Government Statistician, New Zealand
2000–2007
Succeeded by
Geoff Bascand
Preceded by
Dennis Trewin
Australian Statistician
2007–present
Succeeded by