Brian S. Brown

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Brian Brown
Briansbrown-crop.jpg
Brown speaking at a rally in
Madison, Wisconsin
Born Whittier, California
Nationality American
Education Whittier College
Oxford University
UCLA
Occupation Activist
Organization National Organization for Marriage
Religion Roman Catholic
Spouse(s) Susan Brown
Children Seven

Brian S. Brown is an American co-founder of the National Organization for Marriage (NOM), and has served as its President since 2010, having previously served as Executive Director. The National Organization for Marriage is a non-profit political organization established in 2007 to work against legalization of same-sex marriage in the United States. NOM’s mission is “protecting marriage and the faith communities that sustain it.”

Activism[edit]

In 2001, Brown became the executive director of the Family Institute of Connecticut, a socially conservative organization.[1] He was NOM's executive director from its founding in 2007 and was additionally named president in 2010, succeeding Maggie Gallagher. On February 10, 2002 Brown presented a testimony in front of the Connecticut House Judiciary Committee on HB 5002 and HB 5001 [2] NOM led the initiative to pass California’s Proposition 8 resulting in Brown having spent more than 5 years promoting a cause deemed unconstitutional at the US District Court level in Hollingsworth v. Perry.  

NOM Sues The IRS[edit]

In October 2013, Brown announced that The National Organization for Marriage filed a lawsuit in federal court [3] against the Internal Revenue Service for illegally releasing confidential tax documents to the Human Rights Campaign.

Starbucks boycott[edit]

Brian Brown in 2012 announced that NOM would launch a global "Dump Starbucks” campaign in response to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, citing the company's support for same sex marriage.

Personal life and beliefs[edit]

Brown was raised in Whittier, California. As a teenager he became interested in conservative writings, natural law, and issues of religious liberty. At age 25 he converted from Quakerism to Roman Catholicism.[1] He has a bachelor's degree from Whittier College, a master's degree in modern history from Oxford University, and is a C.Phil. at UCLA.[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]