Briana Scurry

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Briana Scurry
Briana Scurry.png
Personal information
Full name Briana Collette Scurry
Date of birth (1971-09-07) September 7, 1971 (age 43)
Place of birth Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Playing position Goalkeeper
Youth career
1986-1989 Anoka High School
1989-1993 UMass Minutemen
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2001–2003 Atlanta Beat
2009–2010 Washington Freedom
National team
1994–2008 United States 173 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Briana Collette Scurry (born September 7, 1971) is an American retired soccer goalkeeper. Scurry was the starting goalkeeper for the United States women's national soccer team at the 1995 World Cup (3rd place), 1996 Summer Olympics (gold medal), 1999 World Cup (champions), 2003 World Cup (3rd place), and the 2004 Summer Olympic Games (gold medal). She played in the semi-final and playoff for third place in the 2007 Women's World Cup (3rd place). She was a founding member of the WUSA, playing three seasons as starting goalkeeper for the Atlanta Beat (2001–2003).

Her career total of 173 international appearances is the most among female soccer goalkeepers. It is also the tenth most of any American female player, and the twentieth most among all women.

Early life[edit]

Scurry was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota [1] to parents, Ernest and Robbie Scurry. She is the youngest of nine children, with three brothers and five sisters.[2]

She played goalie for the Anoka High School Tornadoes for four years and was instrumental in their Minnesota State Championship win in 1989 which ended in a shootout victory. In high school, Scurry ran track and played floor hockey and softball, but basketball was her first and deepest love.[3]

Briana was named Anoka High School's Athena Award winner as the school's top female athlete. She was also named High School All American and Minnesota's top female athlete.[4]

In 2010, she was inducted into the Minnesota State High School Hall of Fame. In September 2011, Scurry was named to the inaugural class of the Anoka High School Hall of Fame.[5][6]

University of Massachusetts[edit]

Scurry attended the University of Massachusetts Amherst and completed her four-year collegiate career with 37 shutouts in 65 starts and with a career record of 48-13-4 and a 0.56 goals-against-average.

As a sophomore in 1991, she started in all 19 games for the Minutewomen, recorded 12 shutouts and allowed just nine goals.

She split time in the net in 1992 during her junior season, starting 13 games and earning seven shutouts. Scurry played three games in 1992 as a forward.

In 1993, she helped lead the UMass Minutewomen to a 17-3-3 record, to the semifinals of the NCAA Women's Soccer Championship and the titles of the Atlantic 10 Conference regular season and tournament. In her senior season, she started all 23 games and recorded 15 shutouts and a 0.48 goals-against average, the third best in the nation.

Scurry was named the National Goalkeeper of the Year in 1993 by the Missouri Athletic Club Sports Foundation and was a 1993 second-team All-American, All-Northeast Region and All-New England first-team selection.

Playing career[edit]

Club[edit]

Scurry was a founding player for the Atlanta Beat in the Women's United Soccer Association (USA), the world's first women's league where the players were paid as professionals.[7] She was the starting goalkeeper for the three seasons (2001-2003) of the league. She helped the Beat to two WUSA Championship Games and was named the league's Goalkeeper of the Year in 2003.[8]

On March 13, 2009, Scurry was named to the preseason roster of the Washington Freedom, in the inaugural season of Women's Professional Soccer (WPS). She suffered a season-ending injury early in the 2010 season, and announced her retirement later that year on September 8.[9]

International[edit]

Scurry was a goalkeeper for the United States women's national soccer team for most of the years between 1994-2008, earning a record 173 caps for the United States. She started 159 of those games and finished her international career with a record of 133-12-14. She also earned 71 shutouts.[10]

Scurry's first appearance for the United States women's national soccer team was March 16, 1994, versus Portugal. Her first shutout was recorded the same day.[11] In her first year with the USA, she earned seven shutouts in 12 starts.[12]

She was a member of the Gold Medal-winning US Women's National Team at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta where she started and played in every minute of the team's five matches conceding only three goals.

Scurry played every minute of the 1999 Women's World Cup allowing only three goals and recording four shutouts.

She started for the USA in the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup and 2004 Summer Olympic Games. She also played two matches for the USA in the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup and was the alternate goalkeeper on the 2008 Olympic Team.

On June 23, 2008, United States Women's Olympic soccer coach Pia Sundhage announced that Scurry would not be on the Olympic team.[13] Her last match for the USA was on November 5, 2008, against the Korea Republic.[14]

Sports administration[edit]

Scurry was appointed general manager of the WPS franchise magicJack beginning with the 2011 season.[15]

Broadcasting[edit]

Scurry was part of the rotation of studio commentators for ESPN's telecasts of the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.[16]

Honors and awards[edit]

  • 1989 High School All-American
  • 1989 Minnesota’s High School Female Athlete of the Year
  • 1993 All-New England, All-Northeast Region, and All-American
  • 1993 National Collegiate Goalkeeper of the Year
  • 1994 Most Valuable Player, Chiquita Cup
  • 1994 Algarve Cup 2nd Place
  • 1995 World Cup Bronze Medalist
  • 1996 Olympic Gold Medalist
  • 1998 Goodwill Games Gold Medalist
  • 1999 Algarve Cup 2nd place
  • 1999 World Cup Champion
  • 1999 Best Goalkeeper Award -World Cup
  • 2000 Algarve Cup Champion
  • 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup Champion
  • 2000 Olympic Silver Medalist
  • 2001 All-WUSA Second Team
  • 2002 All-WUSA Second Team
  • 2003 All-WUSA First Team
  • 2003 WUSA Goalkeeper of the Year
  • 2003 Algarve Cup Champion
  • 2003 World Cup Bronze Medalist
  • 2004 Algarve Cup Champion
  • 2004 Olympic Gold Medalist
  • 2006 CONCACAF Gold Cup Champion
  • 2007 Algarve Cup Champion
  • 2008 Peace Queen Cup Champion
  • 2008 Four Nations Tournament Champion
  • 2008 CONCACAF Tournament Champion

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shipley, Amy. "For U.S. Women, Scurry Bares Her Soul in Goal; In Quarterfinals, It's Do or Die in the Net", The Washington Post, June 30, 1999. Accessed March 17, 2012. "She said she was the only African-American student in her elementary school and usually the only African-American on her soccer teams."
  2. ^ Christopher, Matt (2000). In the Goal with... Briana Scurry. Brown Little. 
  3. ^ DeSimone, Bonnie. "That Scurry, She's A Real Keeper". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  4. ^ "Briana Scurry". Anoka High School. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "Briana Scurry". Anoka High School. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  6. ^ Levy, Paul. "Anoka's Hall of Fame missing two big names: Keillor and Bachmann". StarTribune. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  7. ^ "Briana Scurry bio". ESPN. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  8. ^ "Briana Scurry Officially Announces Retirement". September 8, 2010. Retrieved September 11, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Briana Scurry Officially Announces Retirement". September 8, 2010. Retrieved September 11, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Briana Scurry Retires From Professional Soccer". US Soccer. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  11. ^ "Briana Scurry bio". Soccer Divas. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  12. ^ "Scurry, Briana". Women's Soccer World Online. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  13. ^ "Solo selected for Olympics, Scurry left off roster". ESNPN. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  14. ^ "Briana Scurry Retires From Professional Soccer". US Soccer. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  15. ^ Rusnak, Jeff. "Women's pro soccer team quietly moves to FAU," South Florida Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL), Monday, March 28, 2011.
  16. ^ 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Commentators – ESPN MediaZone.

External links[edit]