Bribe Payers Index

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Bribe Payers Index (BPI) is a measure of how willing a nation appears to comply with demands for corrupt business practices. The first BPI was published by Transparency International on October 26, 1999.

The BPI 2011[edit]

Methodology[edit]

The BPI 2011 ranked 28 of the leading exporting countries on the likelihood their multinational businesses will use bribes when operating abroad. The ranking is calculated from responses by businessmen to two questions on the World Economic Forum’s Executive Opinion Survey.

The first question asks for the country of origin of foreign-owned companies doing the most business in their country. The second question is: "In your experience, to what extent do firms from the countries you have selected make undocumented extra payments or bribes?" Answers are to be given on a scale of 1 (bribes are common or even mandatory) to 10 (bribes are unknown).

The BPI ranking is the averaged score, with higher scores suggesting a lower likelihood of using bribery.

These countries were selected as the leading international or regional exporting countries. Their combined global exports represented 75 percent of the world total in 2006.[1]

BPI 2011 rankings[edit]

Rank Country/Territory Average score[2]
1  Netherlands 8.8
1   Switzerland 8.8
3  Belgium 8.7
4  Germany 8.6
4  Japan 8.6
6  Australia 8.5
6  Canada 8.5
8  Singapore 8.3
8  United Kingdom 8.3
10  United States 8.1
11  France 8.0
11  Spain 8.0
13  South Korea 7.9
14  Brazil 7.7
15  Hong Kong 7.6
15  Italy 7.6
15  Malaysia 7.6
15  South Africa 7.6
19  Taiwan 7.5
19  India 7.5
19  Turkey 7.5
22  Saudi Arabia 7.4
23  Argentina 7.3
23  United Arab Emirates 7.3
25  Indonesia 7.1
26  Mexico 7.0
27  China 6.5
28  Russia 6.1

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

Sources[edit]