List of Brick Renaissance buildings

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Brick Renaissance is the Northern European continuation of brick architecture after Brick Romanesque and Brick Gothic. Although the term Brick Gothic is often used generally for all of this architecture, especially in regard to the Hanseatic cities of the Baltic, the stylistic changes that led to the end of Gothic architecture did reach Northern Germany and northern Europe with delay, leading to the adoption of Renaissance elements into brick building. Nonetheless, it is very difficult for non-experts to distinguish transitional phases or early Brick Renaissance, as the style maintained many typical features of Brick Gothic, such as stepped gables. A clearer distinction only developed at the transition to Baroque architecture. In Lübeck, for example, Brick Renaissance is clearly recognisable in buildings equipped with terracotta reliefs by the artist Statius von Düren, who was also active at Schwerin (Schwerin Castle) and Wismar (Fürstenhof).

More clearly recognisable as Renaissance are brick buildings strongly influenced by the Dutch Renaissance style, such as Reinbek Castle at Reinbek near Hamburg, the Zeughaus at Lübeck, or Friedrichstadt in Schleswig-Holstein.

Belarus[edit]

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Mir Mir Castle 15th-16th century Late 16th century additions to Gothic structure
Belarus-Mir-Castle-8 cropped.jpg

Denmark[edit]

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Copenhagen Børsen 1619–1640 Dutch Renaissance style (architects Hans and Lorents van Steenwinckel) renaissance
Børsen København.jpg
Rosenborg Castle 1606–1624 Built in the Dutch Renaissance style by Architects Bertel Lange and Hans van Steenwinckel
Rosenborg Slot.jpg
Hillerød Frederiksborg Palace 1602–1620 Dutch Renaissance style (architects Hans and Lorents van Steenwinckel)
FrbSlotkirkefløjen15.jpg

Germany[edit]

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Friedrichstadt Market Square early 17th century Plastered brick
Friedrichstadt-markt2004.jpg
Lübeck Mühlentor 1550s (model)
AeusseresMuehlentor.JPG
Schiffergesellschaft 1535–1538
Lübeck Schiffergesellschaft 070311.jpg
Zeughaus 1594
Voelkerkundemuseum.JPG
Reinbek Castle 1572–1576
Schloss Reinbek.JPG

Italy[edit]

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Ferrara Castello Estense 1385–1450, early 16th century The castle essentially presents the appearance given to it by Girolamo da Carpi in the second half of the 16th century
Castello esterno.jpg
Milan Castello Sforzesco 14th century, 1450
Milano Castello 1.jpg

Lithuania[edit]

Town/city Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Vytėnai Panemunė Castle 1604–1610
Vitenai003.JPG
Raudondvaris Raudondvaris Castle 16th century, 1615 Rebuilt 1653–1664
Raudondvaris.jpg
Siesikai Siesikai Castle c. 1517
Siesikai castle.jpg

Poland[edit]

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Brochów Fortified church 1551–1561, 1596 Gothic-renaissance church established by Jan Brochowski and his family as a three-nave church with three side towers
PL Brochów.jpg
Bydgoszcz Church of the Assumption of Mary 1582–1645
Bydgoszcz kosciół Klarysek lato.jpg
Gdańsk Green Gate 1564–1568 Example of the Flemish mannerism in the city inspired by the Antwerp City Hall (architect Regnier van Amsterdam)[1]
Gdańsk Zielona Brama.jpg
Old Arsenal 1602–1605 Built in Dutch/Flemish mannerism by Anthonis van Obbergen, Jan Strakowski and Abraham van den Blocke[2]
Great Armoury in Gdańsk (5).jpg
Gołąb Church of St. Catherine and St. Florian 1628–1638 Polish mannerism style
Goląb kościół 2009.jpg
Grocholin Fortified manor house 16th century Built for Wojciech Baranowski, is a rear example of defense housing architecture in northern Poland[3]
Grocholin fortalicja.jpg
Piotrków Trybunalski Royal Castle 1512–1519 Gothic-renaissance
Piotrkow (js).jpg
Płock Płock Cathedral Dome 1531–1534 Romanesque cathedral, rebuilt several times
6 Plock 023.jpg
Pułtusk Collegiate Church Pułtusk vault 1551–1556 Renaissance frescoes on the vault cover more than 1000 square meters in total[4] (brick church built between 1449 and the first half of the 16th century)
Pułtusk collegiate church.PNG
Sandomierz Town Hall 14th century Rebuilt in the renaissance style in the 16th century
Sandomierz 14a.JPG
Supraśl Orthodox Monastery
- Church of the Annunciation
1503–1511 Gothic-renaissance, destroyed in 1944 by retreating German army,[5] rebuilt since 1985
Suprasl orthodox church 3.jpeg
Tarnów Mikołajowski House 15th century Rebuilt in the renaissance style in 1524
Tarnów, centrum města, ulice za kostelem.JPG
Town Hall 14th century Rebuilt in the renaissance style in the 16th century
Tarnów, centrum města, Rynek, budova radnice.JPG
Zamość Zamość Fortress 1579–1618
Zamosc mury.JPG

Sweden[edit]

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Kristianstad Holy Trinity Church (Swedish: Helga Trefaldighetskyrkan) 1617-1628 The city of Kristianstad was founded by king Christian IV of Denmark in 1614 at a time when Scania was part of the Kingdom of Denmark (until 1658).
Trefaldighetskyrkan-Kristianstad.jpg
Mariefred Gripsholm Castle 1537- Built on the site of a medieval castle, which is partly preserved in the current castle.
Gripsholms slott view2.jpg
Stockholm Swedish House of Nobility (Swedish: Riddarhuset) 1641-1675 The building is more or less unchanged since its construction.
House of Nobility 3.jpg
Trolle Ljungby Trolle Ljungby Castle 1620s-1630s The castle was mainly constructed when Scania was part of the Kingdom of Denmark (until 1658).
Trolle Ljungby slott.jpg

References[edit]

  1. ^ Juliette Roding, Lex Heerma van Voss (1996). The North Sea and culture (1550-1800): proceedings of the international conference held at Leiden 21–22 April 1995. Uitgeverij Verloren. p. 103. ISBN 90-6550-527-X. 
  2. ^ Lech Krzyżanowski, Michał Wożniak, Marek Źak, Wacław Górski (1995). Beautiful historic Gdańsk. Excalibur. p. 769. 
  3. ^ "Historia". www.grocholin.pl (in Polish). Retrieved 2009-12-17. 
  4. ^ Paweł Giergoń. "Pułtusk Kolegiata p.w. Zwiastowania NMP". www.sztuka.net (in Polish). Retrieved 2009-12-17. 
  5. ^ Gegen Ende des Krieges sprengt die deutsche Armee die Kirche auf ihrem Rückzug in die Luft.
    "Geschichte". www.monaster-suprasl.pl (in German). Retrieved 2009-12-17. [dead link]

Translation[edit]

This article incorporates information from this version of the equivalent article on the German Wikipedia.