Bridge to nowhere

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Bridge to Nowhere" redirects here. For other uses, see Bridge to Nowhere (disambiguation).
A highway bridge near Castrop-Rauxel, Germany - built 1978 but not connected on either end
An overpass to nowhere in Summit, New Jersey, Brantwood Terrace Overpass[1] walled off on both ends

A bridge to nowhere is a bridge where one or both ends are broken or incomplete and does not lead anywhere. If it is an overpass or an interchange, the term overpass to nowhere or interchange to nowhere may be used respectively.[2][3] There are three main origins for these bridges:

  • The bridge was never completed for reasons such as cost or disputed property rights.
  • One end or both end has collapsed or have been destroyed – e.g., by earthquake, storm, flood, or war.
  • The bridge is not used, but was not demolished because of the cost; for example, the bridges on an abandoned railway line.

Further, the term "bridge to nowhere" may be used by political opponents to describe a bridge (or proposed bridge) that serves low-population areas at high cost, a symbol of pork barrel spending.[4]

Incomplete and damaged bridges[edit]

Belgium[edit]

Rue Emile Pathé/Emile Pathéstraat in Forest/Vorst, Brussels (50°47′58″N 4°18′24″E / 50.799582°N 4.306687°E / 50.799582; 4.306687), was originally intended to be part of the southern arc of the R0 Brussels motorway ring, which was never built owing to opposition from local residents. It now functions mostly as a car park.

Canada[edit]

  • Port Nelson Bridge, an isolated rail bridge located near Churchill, Manitoba. The connecting rail line was never built due to labor and material shortages combined with a lack of financial or political support and high cost. The project itself was greatly criticized by several politicians, the media (calling it a "gigantic blunder"), and even the project's chief engineer.[5]

China[edit]

Czech Republic[edit]

  • The Borovsko Bridge, an unfinished highway bridge near Borovsko, part of Bernartice municipality, Central Bohemian Region, commonly known as the "Czech Avignon" or "Hitler's Bridge". The original bridge over the Sedlický stream near Borovsko was under construction at KM 59 of the highway between 1939 – 42 and 1948 – 50. Construction was commenced in July 1939 by the civil engineering company "ing. J. Domanský". The planned budget was 5.552.400 crowns. The bridge was finished at the end of 1950 and formally approved by the authorities in 1952. However, highway construction was suspended in the 1950s, the rampart at the southern end was never finished, and the bridge was abandoned. The 1960s brought new hope for the Borovsko Bridge and Czech highways. At the time, the project of the new large drinking water reservoir for Prague was under consideration. Natural supply provided a high quality of water but a huge artificial lake was to flood a number of valleys, including two valleys where the Borovsko Bridge and the smaller neighbouring Sedmpanský Bridge were situated. Various scenarios were examined. One of them was reducing the lake size, but the city of Prague required millions of litres of drinking water. The other option was hydroinsulation of the bridge construction – but this approach was almost as costly as building a new bridge, even without considering the cost of water protection in case of accident etc. Finally, the decision was made to bypass the valley and to build a completely new bridge a few hundred metres to the south. The dam has been in operation since 1976 and this sector of the D1 highway has been in operation since 1977. The Borovsko Bridge and the Sedmpanský Bridge were abandoned, as were the routes a few kilometres west and east from the bridges' location. Today, huge spans of the Borovsko Bridge have been flooded almost up to the roadway. The bridge rests unseen in the middle of the forests of the Bohemian-Moravian Highland, as the whole lake district is a forbidden area and entry is strictly prohibited to ensure water reservoir protection.
  • The Sedmpansky Bridge, an unfinished highway bridge near Hulice, Central Bohemian Region. The former highway bridge over the Sedmpansky stream between Hulice and Borovsko was under construction in 1939 – 42 and finally in 1945 – 50. The bridge was finished, however its fate was the same. Water resources in this area are now used for nearly the whole of Prague.
  • There are several bridges to nowhere, started to be built as a part of extraterritorial highway Vienna-Wroclaw (so called Hitler's highway), which remain unfinished and unconnected to road network.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Highway_bridges_of_unfinished_extraterritorial_highway_Vienna-Wroclaw.

France[edit]

Pont de Saint-Bénezet

Germany[edit]

Soda-Brücke Euskirchen

The colloquial name for a bridge to nowhere in Germany is "Soda-Brücke" (a pun from "so da" = "just there"). Many of the bridges were built in the 1970s as part of the Autobahn network, but the oil crisis and rising environmental consciousness slowed many highway extensions.

New Zealand[edit]

Norway[edit]

  • Eintveitbrua, a 25 metre long two-lane road bridge in Etne municipality in Hordaland county, was completed in 1962 and was intended to be part of a road on the northwestern side of Åkrafjorden. But the road was never built, and the bridge has remained unused except by random hikers. In 2014 broadcaster NRK organized the "opening" of the bridge. Two cars were flown in by helicopter and then drove across the bridge.[6][7]

Russia[edit]

The bridge of Vachevskaya Street in Pavlovsky Posad
  • A two-lane vehicle bridge in Pavlovsky Posad, completed in 2011, continues the minor Vachevskaya Street in the west across the Vokhna River. In the east, there is a dead end, as no vehicle road has been built there, with only a footpath branching off to another street. The bridge may become integrated into traffic once a new road tunnel under railway is completed nearby, and together they would replace a problematic level crossing.[8]

Slovakia[edit]

  • Viaduct in Kopráš, never-used railway viaduct in the village of Kopráš near the town of Jelšava in south Slovakia. The viaduct is 120 m long and 40 m high. It was finished in 1945 but was never used, because the railway to the viaduct was never completed due to the events of World War II.[9] Next to the viaduct are two finished tunnels without any connection to railways. The tunnel near the village of Slavošovce is 2800 m long, and the tunnel near Kopráš is 350 m long. These tunnels to nowhere were also never used, because railway construction ended in 1948 before its completion.[10]

Spain[edit]

  • Bridge to Nowhere in San Martín de la Vega (built 1933), originally projected in 1926. It was severely damaged in March 1947 after a severe flooding, and it was never repaired. Nowadays only a few sections of it stay in place, and the surroundings are now a recreational site.[11]

United Kingdom[edit]

England[edit]

Scotland[edit]

  • M8 Bridge to Nowhere, two separate bridges over the M8 motorway in Glasgow: one eventually had an office block constructed on it; the other, originally built in the 1970s, remained unfinished until July 2013.

United States[edit]

  • Arboretum "ghost ramps" (built 1960s), a set of ramps and bridges over Portage Bay in Seattle that were intended to be an interchange from Washington State Route 520 and the proposed R. H. Thomson Expressway. When plans for the expressway were scrapped following a citizens' freeway revolt, the interchange ramps and bridges remained in place and are mostly unused. On January 31, 2013, Washington state announced that the ghost ramps would be removed sometime between 2014 and 2016.[15]
  • Big Four Bridge (built 1895), a 770 m single-track railroad bridge over the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky, which was abandoned in 1968 and had both its approach spans removed and sold for scrap the following year. In February 2013, the bridge was reopened on one end for pedestrian and bicycle traffic.[16]
  • Bridge to Nowhere (San Gabriel Mountains) (built 1936), an isolated road bridge over the San Gabriel River in southern California. The connecting road was never built. The bridge is a popular destination for hikers.
  • Fort Duquesne Bridge (built 1963), a road bridge over the Allegheny River in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, which ended mid-air until the ramps were completed in 1969.
  • Miles Glacier Bridge (built 1910), also known as the "Million Dollar Bridge", was converted from railroad use to motor vehicle use and located at the northern end of the unfinished Copper River Highway near Cordova, Alaska. Construction stopped in 1964 when an earthquake damaged the 472 m bridge. Although since repaired and reopened the bridge is nonetheless currently of limited utility due to damage along other points of the route.
  • Hoan Bridge (built 1973), a 3 km road bridge over the Milwaukee River in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which was unused until access roads were completed in 1977, was lacking freeway connections at the southern end until 1998, and was "going nowhere again" for two months while closed for major repairs after a span partially collapsed in December 2000.
  • Luten Bridge (built 1925), also known as Mebane Bridge or Mebane's Bridge, is a road bridge over the Dan River in Rockingham County on the outskirts of the town of Eden, North Carolina, which was at the center of the landmark Luten Bridge Co. vs. Rockingham County lawsuit that made jurisprudence in 1929 when the contractor continued work on it well after the contract to build it was rescinded and subsequently sued to be reimbursed for this work.
  • Pier 19 (demolished 2012) of a proposed second span of the Ambassador Bridge connecting Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. No second span had ever been approved for this privately owned bridge, largely because the proposal would dump excessive traffic onto Windsor city surface streets, but its owners built ramps for the proposed span in an attempt to counter an internationally supported proposal for a Detroit River International Crossing to the Windsor-Essex Parkway further downriver.[17] The unauthorized ramp was removed in 2012 by court order.[18]

Bridges to unpopulated or low population areas[edit]

Canada[edit]

  • In Jasper National Park, at the outlet of Maligne Lake there is a bridge that crosses the outlet river, and proceeds about 300 meters to a parking lot and several hiking trails and a boat launch. The bridge cost millions of dollars to build and was part of a proposed route through the mountains that was never completed.

Russia[edit]

  • The Russky Bridge in Vladivostok was criticised as a 'bridge to nowhere', costing about US$1 billion and serving an island where only 5,000 people live.[19]
  • A four-lane vehicle overpass across the Moscow Ring Road at its 83rd kilometer (sometimes called Molokovsky Overpass) continues the Molokova Street in the Lianozovo District of Moscow outside the city. The Molokova Street is located within a gated community with only local traffic allowed; at the other end, the bridge serves only the Lianozovo Cemetery with a small parking lot next to it, coming to a dead end before a forest. As a result, the overpass only receives significant traffic on prayer for the dead days such as Saturday of Souls.

United States[edit]

Obsolete bridges and approaches[edit]

Canada[edit]

Ontario Highway 548 has a short stub of roadway (with double-yellow line still visible) aside of a more recent bridge approach, of which was a former ferry approach which is now used as a parking lot for people to go fishing from an island connecting the longer bridge to a shorter bridge to St. Joseph Island.

The former Bay of Quinte Railway mainline in Napanee (acquired by the now-defunct Canadian Northern Railway in 1910, extended to a Smiths Falls station but abandoned by the late 1970s) still has an Ontario Highway 401 overpass. The rail overpass served a Goodyear tyre factory across the highway until the track was disconnected at Napanee station in 2012; it now goes nowhere. A bascule bridge on the same defunct line crosses the UNESCO-listed Rideau Canal at Smiths Falls, Ontario; that rail bridge sits permanently open but is protected as part of a listed historic site.[23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bridge to Nowhere - Summit, NJ". 
  2. ^ Daniel, Mac (12 December 2004). "Work underway on Route 128 widening project". Retrieved 15 February 2014. 
  3. ^ Rosen, Jill (2 November 1998). "I-95 Exit `To Nowhere' Will Now Go Somewhere". Sun Sentinel. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  4. ^ Ou, Lingxiao. "The Results Are In: Chinese Stimulus Fails". The Hertitage Foundation. Retrieved 11 August 2012. The world’s longest sea bridge, built in Qingdao, [the Jiaozhou Bay Bridge ] has few users, making it the Chinese version of the “Bridge to Nowhere.” 
  5. ^ Malaher, David (Autumn 1984). "Port Nelson and the Hudson Bay Railway". Manitoba History (Manitoba Historical Society) (8). ISSN 0226-5036. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 
  6. ^ NRK: Ei 52 år forseinka bruopning (3 February 2014, retrieved 19 August 2014)
  7. ^ NRK: – Dette var ein vill reportasjeidé (7 February 2014, retrieved 19 August 2014)
  8. ^ Путепровод в Павловском Посаде (in Russian). Retrieved 2014-12-22. 
  9. ^ "The Lost Viaduct - Stratený viadukt". 
  10. ^ "Gemerské spojky". 
  11. ^ "Sign with facts about San Martín bridge". 
  12. ^ "The Bridge To Nowhere". 
  13. ^ Bordesley Station, Warwickshire Railways: http://www.warwickshirerailways.com/gwr/gwrbg1329.htm
  14. ^ Northwest Exploration, 2009: http://nwex.co.uk/showthread.php?t=4652
  15. ^ "520 "ramps to nowhere" to come down". Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  16. ^ Staff (7 February 2013). "Big Four bridge opens in Louisville". Business First of Louisville. American City Business Journals. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 
  17. ^ Dave Battagello (April 26, 2012). "Moroun's 'bridge to nowhere' dismantled". Windsor Star. 
  18. ^ http://www.freep.com/article/20120417/BUSINESS06/204170331/
  19. ^ Vladivostok's new iconic 'Golden Gate' bridge opens for ordinary traffic
  20. ^ Associated Press staff (September 23, 2007). "Alaska Seeks Alternative to Bridge Plan". New York Times. Retrieved April 3, 2009. 
  21. ^ Dermot Cole (August 5, 2014). "Alaska's longest bridge completed across Tanana River". Alaska Dispatch News. Retrieved August 5, 2014. 
  22. ^ Tim Ellis (November 8, 2013). "State’s Longest Bridge Nears Completion, But Budget Cuts May Limit Army’s Ability to Use It". KUAC. Retrieved August 5, 2014. 
  23. ^ New canal head may change hiring methods, Ottawa Citizen, Nov 8, 1983 (railway bridge is second-last paragraph)