Brielle, New Jersey

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Brielle, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Brielle
Motto: "A Community By the River"[1]
Map of Brielle in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Brielle in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Brielle, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Brielle, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°06′18″N 74°03′46″W / 40.105062°N 74.062755°W / 40.105062; -74.062755Coordinates: 40°06′18″N 74°03′46″W / 40.105062°N 74.062755°W / 40.105062; -74.062755[2][3]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated June 3, 1919
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Thomas B. Nicol (term ends December 31, 2015)[4]
 • Administrator / Clerk Thomas F. Nolan[5]
Area[3]
 • Total 2.375 sq mi (6.151 km2)
 • Land 1.757 sq mi (4.550 km2)
 • Water 0.618 sq mi (1.601 km2)  26.02%
Area rank 382nd of 566 in state
26th of 53 in county[3]
Elevation [7] 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 4,774
 • Estimate (2013[11]) 4,771
 • Rank 385th of 566 in state
34th of 53 in county[12]
 • Density 2,717.5/sq mi (1,049.2/km2)
 • Density rank 229th of 566 in state
27th of 53 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08730[13][14]
Area code(s) 732 exchanges: 223, 292, 528[15]
FIPS code 3402507750[16][3][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885170[18][3]
Website www.briellenj.com

Brielle is a borough located in southern Monmouth County, New Jersey along the Manasquan River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,774,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 119 (-2.4%) from the 4,893 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 487 (+11.1%) from the 4,406 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Brielle was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 10, 1919, from portions of Wall Township, based on the results of a referendum passed on June 3, 1919.[20]

Geography[edit]

Brielle welcome sign at the border with Manasquan on Union Avenue.

Brielle is located at 40°06′18″N 74°03′46″W / 40.105062°N 74.062755°W / 40.105062; -74.062755 (40.105062,-74.062755). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.375 square miles (6.151 km2), of which, 1.757 square miles (4.550 km2) of it was land and 0.618 square miles (1.601 km2) of it (26.02%) was water.[3][2]

Brielle is bordered to the north and east by the borough of Manasquan, to the west by Wall Township and to the south by the borough of Point Pleasant Beach across the Manasquan River. Route 35 runs through the middle of the town and Route 70 runs along its western edge.

The borough is primarily a residential community of single homes, with a few condominiums; there are almost no undeveloped lots of land left. There are several businesses located along Union Avenue and Higgins Avenue and some marinas along the Manasquan River. Ripley's Believe It or Not! once stated that Brielle has "16 bars and no churches".[21] It currently has one church, The Church in Brielle (formerly the Dutch Reformed Church) and several restaurants that have a liquor license, but no true bars. There is also a 140 acres (0.57 km2) 18 hole Manasquan River Golf Club.

The town has approximately 6.4 kilometers (4.0 mi) of waterfront along the Manasquan River, Glimmerglass, and Debbie's Creek, all of which are salt water and tidal. Brielle's borders extend to an 8-acre (32,000 m2) island in the Manasquan River.

History[edit]

Archaeological excavations along what is now Birch Drive reveal temporary Lenape Native American settlements. The Lenape practiced farming in other parts of Monmouth County much of the year, and they visited the wooded areas in what is now Brielle for hunting and fishing.

The area was originally part of Shrewsbury Township and the first settlers were primarily farmers, and the area became known as Union Landing. In colonial times, salt was an important preservative, and before the American Revolutionary War, most of it was imported from Great Britain. The Union Salt Works opened around the outbreak of the war, and on April 5, 1778, several British Loyalists attacked and burned the salt works and other buildings. A year later, the salt works reopened and continued to operate through the duration of the war.[22][23]

Early in the 19th century, Shrewsbury Township was divided, and the area became part of Howell Township which was further divided in 1851, when the area became part of Wall Township. On July 7, 1881, a group of businessmen purchased several acres of land and formed the Brielle Land Association with the intention of building vacation homes. The quaint riverside charm of the area reminded one of the developers of another pastoral town on a river which he had visited, Brielle, in the Netherlands.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 392
1930 684 74.5%
1940 961 40.5%
1950 1,328 38.2%
1960 2,619 97.2%
1970 3,594 37.2%
1980 4,068 13.2%
1990 4,406 8.3%
2000 4,893 11.1%
2010 4,774 −2.4%
Est. 2013 4,771 [11] −0.1%
Population sources: 1920[25]
1920-1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,774 people, 1,805 households, and 1,336 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,717.5 per square mile (1,049.2 /km2). There were 2,034 housing units at an average density of 1,157.8 per square mile (447.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.64% (4,518) White, 2.53% (121) Black or African American, 0.10% (5) Native American, 0.94% (45) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.46% (22) from other races, and 1.32% (63) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.18% (152) of the population.[8]

There were 1,805 households, of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.4% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.13.[8]

In the borough, 26.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 18.7% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.9 years. For every 100 females there were 97.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.3 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $98,419 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,635) and the median family income was $108,818 (+/- $11,831). Males had a median income of $84,568 (+/- $8,259) versus $53,041 (+/- $4,411) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,445 (+/- $5,694). About 0.0% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 4,893 people, 1,938 households, and 1,414 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,754.4 people per square mile (1,061.3/km2). There were 2,123 housing units at an average density of 1,195.1 per square mile (460.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.05% White, 3.52% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 1.61% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.31% of the population.[28][29]

There were 1,938 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.00.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $178,368, and the median income for a family was $172,867. Males had a median income of $98,828 versus $72,156 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $105,785. About 2.6% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Brielle Borough Hall, at the corner of Union Avenue and Union Lane.

Brielle is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of the Borough of Brielle is Republican Thomas B. Nicol, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015. Members of the Brielle Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Council President John V. Visceglia (R, 2014; Budget & Finance), Frank A. Garruzzo (R, 2015; Public Safety), Cort W. Gorham (R, 2013; Administrative & Personnel), Paul K. Nolan (R, 2015; Public Resources), Ann D. Scott (R, 2013; Public Works) and Timothy A. Shaak (R, 2014; none listed).[31][32][33][34]

Federal, state, and county representation[edit]

Brielle is located in the 4th Congressional District[35] and is part of New Jersey's 30th state legislative district.[9][36][37] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Brielle had been in the 11th state legislative district.[38]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[40][41] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[42][43]

The 30th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert Singer (R, Lakewood Township) and in the General Assembly by Sean T. Kean (R, Wall Township) and Dave Rible (R, Wall Township).[44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[47] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[48] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[49] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[50] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[51] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[52][53] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[54] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[55] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,653 registered voters in Brielle, of which 617 (16.9%) were registered as Democrats, 1,446 (39.6%) were registered as Republicans and 1,590 (43.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[57]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 61.3% of the vote here (1,842 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 36.1% (1,085 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (40 votes), among the 3,003 ballots cast by the borough's 3,824 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.5%.[58] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 67.5% of the vote here (1,971 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 31.3% (913 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (18 votes), among the 2,918 ballots cast by the borough's 3,805 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.7.[59]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.9% of the vote here (1,571 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 22.2% (491 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.8% (129 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (13 votes), among the 2,215 ballots cast by the borough's 3,664 registered voters, yielding a 60.5% turnout.[60]

Education[edit]

Brielle Elementary School

The Brielle School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. Brielle Elementary School had an enrollment of 672 students in the 2010-11 school year.[61]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Manasquan High School in Manasquan, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Manasquan Public Schools.[62]

The Brielle Public Library, which is located at 610 South Street, claims to have been the first library in New Jersey to have offered public access to the Internet.[63]

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus transportation between the borough and Philadelphia on the 317 route and local service on the 830 route.[64]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Brielle include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Borough of Brielle, New Jersey". Borough of Brielle, New Jersey. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  5. ^ Borough Phone Directory, Borough of Brielle. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 58.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Brielle, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Brielle borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 13. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Brielle borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Brielle, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Brielle, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 178. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  21. ^ Biese, Alex. "It's a Special Year", Asbury Park Press, April 26, 2007. Accessed July 29, 2012. "Fifty years ago, the borough of Brielle held a dubious distinction. 'There were 17 bars and no churches in Brielle,' said the Rev. Paul Walther, 57, of Brielle."
  22. ^ History, Borough of Brielle. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  23. ^ Delancey, Karen Hammerdorfer. "This day's invasion of Brielle welcome", Asbury Park Press, September 8, 2002. Accessed October 16, 2013. "During the Revolutionary War, Brielle was attacked by some 200 British soldiers who burned down the Union Salt Works and many other buildings."
  24. ^ Martin, Patti. "BRIELLE Community spirit shines through", Asbury Park Press, November 28, 2003. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Brielle borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Brielle borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Brielle borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  31. ^ Brielle Mayor and Council, Borough of Brielle. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  32. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  33. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 8, 2011, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  34. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 2, 2010, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  35. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  40. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  42. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  43. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  48. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  49. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  50. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  58. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  59. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  60. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  61. ^ Data for the Brielle Elementary School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  62. ^ Brielle School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 7, 2013. "Brielle Borough is a shore residential community covering 1.78 square miles in Monmouth County, New Jersey. The Board of Education maintains one school in a K-8 district. Students in grades 9 through 12 attend Manasquan High School."
  63. ^ Brielle Public Library, Borough of Brielle
  64. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  65. ^ Borowski, Greg. "Ideals bind history major to urban policing; City's next chief cherishes duel with civic problems", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, January 6, 2008. Accessed August 10, 2012. "Flynn grew up in Brielle, N.J., a shore town about 60 south of New York City.... Education was at St. Catherine's School in nearby Spring Lake, then Christian Brothers Academy for high school, graduating in 1966."
  66. ^ Angermiller, Michele Amabile. "Skrillex Scares Dolphins, Draws Revelers to Seaside Bamboozle Fest; The electronic artist's set concerned oceanographers, who feared the musical bombast would affect dolphins.", The Hollywood Reporter, May 19, 2012. Accessed July 29, 2012. "The night was a homecoming for many of the artists. Incubus bassist Ben Kenney hails from Brielle, N.J."
  67. ^ Geiser, John. "Jaws", Asbury Park Press, June 15, 2001. Accessed January 1, 2001. "Capt Frank Mundus the legendary shark hunter who once lived in Brielle and fished in Shore area waters for sharks..."
  68. ^ Article lists Brielle as home and William Rae as father."Monmouth County Army Casualties". Red Bank Register (Red Bank, New Jersey). 1945-03-29. p. 2. Vol. LXVII., No. 40. Retrieved 2011-01-01. 
  69. ^ Staff. "EX-ACTOR KILLED IN ACTION; Sgt. Nelson Rae an Army Casualty in Belgium, Parents Learn", The New York Times, January 27, 1945. Accessed July 29, 2012. "BRIELLE, NJ, Jan. 26-Sgt. Nelson Rae, former radio and musical comedy player who was last featured as a vocalist in the Broadway production of Pal Joey, has been killed in action on the Belgian front, according to a War Department message received here by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Rae, today."

External links[edit]