Brigantine, New Jersey

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Brigantine, New Jersey
City
City of Brigantine
View of Brigantine from Revel Atlantic City
View of Brigantine from Revel Atlantic City
Motto: "An island you'll love for life!"
Map of Brigantine in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County in New Jersey.
Map of Brigantine in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Brigantine, New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Brigantine, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617Coordinates: 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated June 14, 1890
Government[7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Philip J. Guenther, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Manager Jennifer Blumenthal[4]
 • Clerk Lynn Sweeney[5]
 • Chief of police Timothy J. Reed[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 10.364 sq mi (26.844 km2)
 • Land 6.387 sq mi (16.543 km2)
 • Water 3.977 sq mi (10.301 km2)  38.37%
Area rank 207th of 566 in state
11th of 23 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 9,450
 • Estimate (2013)[12] 9,406
 • Rank 252nd of 566 in state
9th of 23 in county[13]
 • Density 1,479.5/sq mi (571.2/km2)
 • Density rank 338th of 566 in state
10th of 23 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08203[14][15]
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 264, 266[16]
FIPS code 3400107810[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885171[19][2]
Website bb-nj.com

Brigantine is an island city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 9,450,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 3,144 (-25.0%) from the 12,594 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,240 (+10.9%) from the 11,354 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

What is now the City of Brigantine has passed through a series of names and re-incorporations since it was first created. The area was originally incorporated as Brigantine Beach Borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 14, 1890, from portions of Galloway Township, based on the results of a referendum held on June 3, 1890. On April 23, 1897, the area was reincorporated as the City of Brigantine City. This name lasted until April 9, 1914, when it was renamed the City of East Atlantic City. On March 16, 1924, Brigantine was incorporated as a city, replacing East Atlantic City and incorporating further portions of Galloway Township.[21]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Brigantine as its 36th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[22]

Geography[edit]

Brigantine is located at 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617 (39.427291,-74.389617). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 10.364 square miles (26.844 km2), of which, 6.387 square miles (16.543 km2) of it was land and 3.977 square miles (10.301 km2) of it (38.37%) was water.[1][2] Brigantine is located on Brigantine Island.

The only road to and from Brigantine is New Jersey Route 87, locally known as Brigantine Boulevard. The Justice Vincent S. Haneman Memorial Bridge is the only way on and off the island. The original bridge to the island that was constructed in 1924 was destroyed in the Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944. The current bridge was constructed in 1972.[23]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Brigantine has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 99
1910 67 −32.3%
1920 12 −82.1%
1930 357 2,875.0%
1940 403 12.9%
1950 1,267 214.4%
1960 4,201 231.6%
1970 6,741 60.5%
1980 8,318 23.4%
1990 11,354 36.5%
2000 12,594 10.9%
2010 9,450 −25.0%
Est. 2013 9,406 [12][25] −0.5%
Population sources:
1900-2000[26] 1900-1920[27]
1900-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[9][10][11]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 9,450 people, 4,294 households, and 2,521 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,479.5 per square mile (571.2/km2). There were 9,222 housing units at an average density of 1,443.8 per square mile (557.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 87.33% (8,253) White, 2.91% (275) Black or African American, 0.17% (16) Native American, 4.72% (446) Asian, 0.03% (3) Pacific Islander, 2.51% (237) from other races, and 2.33% (220) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.88% (650) of the population.[9]

There were 4,294 households, of which 18.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.3% were non-families. 33.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.79.[9]

In the city, 16.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 33.6% from 45 to 64, and 21.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48.4 years. For every 100 females there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,212 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,472) and the median family income was $79,318 (+/- $7,962). Males had a median income of $55,595 (+/- $5,655) versus $42,622 (+/- $5,179) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,571 (+/- $3,305). About 5.9% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 3.9% of those age 65 or over.[33]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 12,594 people, 5,473 households, and 3,338 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,959.0 people per square mile (756.2/km2). There were 9,304 housing units at an average density of 1,447.2 per square mile (558.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 83.15% White, 3.94% African American, 0.18% Native American, 5.72% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 4.67% from other races, and 2.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.41% of the population.[31][32]

There were 5,473 households out of which 24.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.9% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.0% were non-families. 30.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.89.[31][32]

In the city the population was spread out with 20.8% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.4 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the city was $44,639, and the median income for a family was $51,679. Males had a median income of $40,523 versus $29,779 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,950. About 7.6% of families and 9.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.9% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Since 1989, the City of Brigantine has been governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Council-Manager form (Plan 5), implemented by direct petition effective as of January 1, 1991.[34] The city is governed by a City Council consisting of a Mayor (elected at large), two at-large Council members and four ward Council members, all of whom serve terms of office of four years. The mayor and the two at-large council seats come up for vote as part of the November general election in leap years, with the four ward seats up for vote simultaneously two years later. The Mayor presides over the meetings of City Council. The Council adopts the municipal budget and enacts ordinances to promote and ensure the security, health, government and protection of the City and its residents.[7][35][36]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Brigantine City is Republican Philip J. Guenther, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014.[37] Members of the City Council are Rick DeLucry (Ward 4; D, 2016), Frank Kern (at-large; D, 2014), Lisa McClay (Ward 2; D, 2016), Joseph M. Picardi (Ward 3; D, 2016), Dominic "Tony" Pullella (at-large; D, 2014) and Andrew Simpson (Ward 1; R, 2016).[36][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Brigantine is located in the 2nd Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[10][41][42]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[46][47]

The 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City) and in the General Assembly by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and John F. Amodeo (D, Northfield).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[51][52] As of 2014, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[53] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor (R, 2015),[54] Vice Chairman John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[55] Colin G. Bell, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2015),[56] James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth (R, 2015),[57] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (R, 2016),[58] Richard Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (D, 2016),[59] Alexander C. Marino, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[60] Will Pauls, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2016)[61] and Frank Sutton, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (R, 2014).[62][63][64] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (2016),[65] Sheriff Frank X. Balles (2014)[66] and Surrogate James Curcio (2015).[67][68]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,430 registered voters in Brigantine City, of which 1,219 (19.0% vs. 30.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,679 (41.7% vs. 25.2%) were registered as Republicans and 2,524 (39.3% vs. 44.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered to other parties.[69] Among the city's 2010 Census population, 68.0% (vs. 58.8% in Atlantic County) were registered to vote, including 81.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 76.6% countywide).[69][70]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 2,462 votes here (53.5% vs. 41.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,068 votes (44.9% vs. 57.9%) and other candidates with 49 votes (1.1% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,605 ballots cast by the city's 6,944 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.3% (vs. 65.8% in Atlantic County).[71][72] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,652 votes here (53.2% vs. 41.6% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,218 votes (44.5% vs. 56.5%) and other candidates with 67 votes (1.3% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,984 ballots cast by the city's 7,214 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.1% (vs. 68.1% in Atlantic County).[73] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,627 votes here (53.7% vs. 46.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,181 votes (44.6% vs. 52.0%) and other candidates with 36 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,888 ballots cast by the city's 6,847 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.4% (vs. 69.8% in the whole county).[74]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,270 votes here (73.2% vs. 60.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 715 votes (23.1% vs. 34.9%) and other candidates with 35 votes (1.1% vs. 1.3%), among the 3,099 ballots cast by the city's 6,977 registered voters, yielding a 44.4% turnout (vs. 41.5% in the county).[75][76] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,877 votes here (57.7% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,147 votes (35.2% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 173 votes (5.3% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 26 votes (0.8% vs. 1.2%), among the 3,255 ballots cast by the city's 6,632 registered voters, yielding a 49.1% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[77]

Education[edit]

The Brigantine Public Schools serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. The district is governed by the Brigantine Board of Education and operates as a Type I school district. The school board consists of seven members who are appointed to three-year terms by the Mayor, the Council and the City Manager on a staggered basis.[78]

As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 768 students and 68.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.15:1.[79] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[80]) are Brigantine Elementary School[81] serves grades PreK-4 (473 students) and Brigantine North Middle School[82] serves grades 5-8 (295 students).[83]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades, along with those from Margate City and Ventnor City, attend Atlantic City High School in neighboring Atlantic City, as part of sending/receiving relationships with the Atlantic City School District.[84]

City public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology[85] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[86]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 64.45 miles (103.72 km) of roadways, of which 60.54 miles (97.43 km) were maintained by the municipality, 3.74 miles (6.02 km) by Atlantic County, 0.06 miles (0.097 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.11 miles (0.18 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.[87]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provide bus service to and from Atlantic City on the 501 route.[88][89]

Points of interest[edit]

Beach at Brigantine, on the Atlantic Ocean side of the island

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Brigantine include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  4. ^ Jennifer Blumenthal - City Manager, Brigantine Beach. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  5. ^ City Clerk, Brigantine Beach. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  6. ^ Chief of Police Tim Reed, Brigantine Police Department. Accessed December 13, 2014.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 13.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Brigantine, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Brigantine city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Brigantine city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Brigantine, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 26, 2011.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Brigantine, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 15, 2013.
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  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed March 20, 2013.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 67. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  22. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  23. ^ Zatzariny, Jr., Tim. "Development thrusts change upon once-sleepy Brigantine", Courier-Post, July 22, 2001. Accessed September 1, 2013. "In 1924, a bridge linking Brigantine and Atlantic City opened, creating a land boom.... In 1944, a hurricane damaged the Brigantine Bridge, the island's only access to the mainland. For 21 months, residents had to be ferried on and off the island during repairs. A new bridge replaced the original in 1972."
  24. ^ Climate Summary for Brigantine, New Jersey
  25. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  26. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 2000, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed March 21, 2013.
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed November 26, 2011.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Brigantine city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 21, 2013.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Brigantine city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 21, 2013.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Brigantine borough, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  34. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 15, 2013.
  35. ^ Form of Government, Brigantine Beach. Accessed March 21, 2013.
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  37. ^ Philip Guenther, Brigantine Beach. Accessed November 27, 2014.
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  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
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  55. ^ John W. Risley, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Colin G. Bell, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  57. ^ James A. Bertino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  58. ^ Ernest D. Coursey, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  59. ^ Richard Dase, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  60. ^ Alexander C. Marino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  61. ^ Will Pauls, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  62. ^ Frank Sutton, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  63. ^ Atlantic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
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  65. ^ Ed McGettigan, Atlantic County Clerk. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  66. ^ Frank X. Balles, Sheriff, Atlantic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed September 14, 2014.
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  78. ^ School Facilities, City of Brigantine. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  79. ^ District information for Brigantine School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  80. ^ School Data for the Brigantine Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  81. ^ Brigantine Elementary School, Brigantine Public Schools. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  82. ^ Brigantine North Middle School, Brigantine Public Schools. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  83. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Brigantine Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 27, 2014.
  84. ^ "From the Superintendent: Welcome to the Atlantic City Public School District", Atlantic City School District. Accessed November 27, 2014. "I would like to extend a warm welcome to our 7,488 students for the 2014-2015 school year! Our elementary schools serve Atlantic City residents, while our high school serves students from Atlantic City, Ventnor, Brigantine, Margate and Choice students from across Atlantic County."
  85. ^ Mission, Atlantic County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 15, 2013.
  86. ^ Profile, Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts. Accessed November 15, 2013.
  87. ^ Atlantic County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  88. ^ Atlantic County Bus / Rail Connections, new Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 15, 2013.
  89. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 15, 2013.
  90. ^ McKelvey, Wallace. "Construction companies volunteer to restore Brigantine lighthouse after Sandy", The Press of Atlantic City, August 29, 2013. Accessed September 15, 2013. "The lighthouse served many purposes over the last century. In addition to its role as the centerpiece of a real estate development, it became a police station in the 1930s, when the municipality had only a few officers..... Later, in the 1970s, the structure housed the city's original museum, Kramer said.... Despite its lamp, Kramer said, the lighthouse was too low and too far from the beach to ever serve as a navigational aid."
  91. ^ About Us, Marine Mammal Stranding Center. Accessed September 15, 2013.
  92. ^ Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, GORP. Accessed June 2, 2009. "Forsythe Refuge's Brigantine and Barnegat Divisions were ... established in 1939 and 1967 respectively, to perpetuate the use of tidal wetland and shallow bay habitat by migratory water birds."
  93. ^ The Brigantine Hotel, libertynet.org. Accessed March 21, 2013.
  94. ^ The Brigantine Hotel, libertynet.org. Accessed March 21, 2013.
  95. ^ Structure of the Peace Mission Movement, International Peace Mission movement. Accessed March 21, 2013.
  96. ^ Weinert, Joe. "HIGH ROLLER FOLLOWS EXEC TO BORGATA", The Press of Atlantic City, October 19, 2002. Accessed November 15, 2013. "Borislow made his fortune as founder of the Tel-Save Holdings long-distance company. He owns race horses and splits his time between homes in Brigantine and Palm Beach, Fla."
  97. ^ Barlas, Thomas. "ATLANTIC CITY NATIVE, AGE 37, TAKES TRUMP MARINA HELM / BROWN FIRST CASINO CHIEF BORN IN THE RESORT TOWN", The Press of Atlantic City, May 11, 1998. Accessed November 15, 2013. "'They say, 'no one was born in Atlantic City.' He grew up across Absecon Inlet in Brigantine."
  98. ^ Staff. "REMEMBER WHEN: BUDDING ROMANCE, 1880", The Press of Atlantic City, March 8, 2006. Accessed July 1, 2011. "Mary Raith Holst, of Brigantine, submitted this picture of some of her ancestors, taken during a Morris Guard encampment at Delaware Water Gap in the 1880s."
  99. ^ Landau, Joel. "Kennedys introduce newborn son to media outside hospital in Galloway Township", The Press of Atlantic City, April 18, 2012. Accessed April 18, 2012. "Kennedy, 44, the son of the late U.S. Senator Edward 'Ted' Kennedy and nephew of President John F. Kennedy, was dressed in a sport coat and jeans and cracked a few jokes before the couple departed to their Brigantine home."
  100. ^ Good, Daniel. "A mature subject for local author's new teen novel", The Press of Atlantic City, July 13, 2008. Accessed September 2, 2008. "The work station in her Absecon home resembles a child's bedroom....Plum-Ucci, a Brigantine native, situates her stories in the towns and beaches from her childhood."
  101. ^ via United Press. "Cornell Elects Rosenbaum", The New York Times, December 4, 1954. Accessed April 18, 2012. "John J. Rosenbaum Jr. of Brigantine, N. J., today was elected captain of Cornell's 1955 varsity cross-country team."
  102. ^ Witchel, Alex. "Taking the Crown, Then Taking OrdersFormer Miss America Kate Shindle Revisits Favorite Haunts", The New York Times, August 28, 2014. Accessed November 27, 2014. "Ms. Shindle, 37, was raised in Brigantine, N.J., near Atlantic City; her mother served on the Miss America hostess committee."

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Preceded by
Beach Haven
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Atlantic City