Brisbane Arcade

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Brisbane Arcade
Brisbanearcadeentrance.jpg
Queen Street Mall entrance of Brisbane Arcade.
Location Queen Street Mall
Coordinates 27°28′08″S 153°01′31″E / 27.468942°S 153.025331°E / -27.468942; 153.025331Coordinates: 27°28′08″S 153°01′31″E / 27.468942°S 153.025331°E / -27.468942; 153.025331
Address 160 Queen Street Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Opening date October 1923
Architect Richard Gailey, Jr.
No. of stores and services 50[1]
Website brisbanearcade.com.au

Brisbane Arcade is a heritage-listed shopping arcade located at 160 Queen Street and runs from Queen Street (now part of Queen Street Mall) and Adelaide Street in the city of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

History[edit]

Brisbane Arcade was built in 1923 for Dr James Mayne, and his sister Mary Emelia Mayne. It was designed by Richard Gailey, Junior (the son of architect Richard Gailey),[2] and constructed at a cost of £70,000, with the Queen Street section built by J. & E.L. Rees, and the Adelaide Street section completed by Forsyth and Speering.[3][4] Construction was completed in the same year and the arcade was subsequently opened in 1924.[5]

Since the deaths of James Mayne in 1939, and Mary Mayne in 1940, Brisbane Arcade has been operated by a board of trustees acting on behalf of their estates, with operating proceeds benefiting the University of Queensland School of Medicine.[4][6][7] McGees Property manages the arcade on behalf of the board of trustees.[7][8]

On 5 February 1952, the Johnstone Gallery was opened in a former bomb shelter under Brisbane Arcade, where it remained until closing on 19 December 1957 in order to relocate to Bowen Hills.[9]

Brisbane Arcade was added to the Queensland Heritage Register on 21 October 1992.[4]

Design[edit]

Exterior[edit]

Brisbane Arcade has two frontages; one on the Queen Street Mall, and one on Adelaide Street. Both facades are three-storeys high and five window bays across, have central entrances, feature the name 'Brisbane Arcade' in raised lettering, are of face brickwork with cement dressings, and use plain classical details.[4]

The Queen Street Mall facade has triangular classical pediments at parapet level above each end window bay.[4] These end bays are separated by flanking brick pilasters, and have cantilevered balconies on both levels with wrought iron railings consisting of vertical balustrading.[4] The openings contain timber framed multi-paned windows and French doors which open onto the balconies.[4] Ornate floral mouldings are situated on the pilasters to either side of the upper level openings.[4] A deep bracketed cornice runs between the base of the pediments separating the parapet from the remainder of the facade.[4] The parapet has raised sections at each end and in the centre.[4]

The Adelaide Street facade has a similar arrangement of openings, but has arched windows in the end bays of the top floor with keystones that extend to the cornice line.[4] A similar cornice occurs above all the other window openings as sun hoods.[4] Cantilevered balconies occur only on the first floor level at each end and in the centre.[4] These have wrought iron railings with diagonal balustrading.[4]

The roof structure above the arcade consists of lightweight exposed steel trusses, and natural light is allowed into the space through clerestory windows on each side.[4]

Interior[edit]

Although both frontages of the building are three-storied, this three-storey section extends only part of the way into the building from either end, and is linked by the two storey arcade.[4] The central space has a void running the length of the arcade, crossed by a central walkway leading to the galleries on each side.[4] The upper level is accessed by stairs at each end which retain their original terrazzo finishes.[4] The arcade features art work from the hosting of Brisbane's World Expo '88, namely, "Mirage" by Swiss-Israeli artist Gidon Graetz.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Directory". Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Brisbane Arcade". MustDoBrisbane.com. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  3. ^ "Brisbane Buildings". The Brisbane Courier (National Library of Australia). 13 November 1923. p. 17. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Brisbane Arcade (entry 14833)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. 
  5. ^ McGees Property. "Stunning Heritage Brisbane Arcade". McGees Property. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  6. ^ "History". Brisbane Arcade. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "Brisbane Arcade turns 85". Brisbane Marketing Pty Ltd. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  8. ^ Calligeros, Marissa (19 October 2012). "Former chocolate shop a sweet vacancy". Brisbane Times. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  9. ^ Martin-Chew, Louise. "Johnstone, Brian William Wallace (1920–1988)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 

External links[edit]