Bristol Type 109

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Type 109
Role Long-distance biplane
National origin United Kingdom
Manufacturer Bristol Aeroplane Company
Designer Frank Barnwell
First flight 1928
Retired 1931
Number built 1

The Bristol Type 109 was a British two-seat long-distance biplane built by the Bristol Aeroplane Company at Filton Aerodrome, England.[1]

Design and development[edit]

The Type 109 was a single-engine two-seat conventional biplane built in 1928 for an attempt on the world distance record.[1] The Type 109, registered G-EBZK and powered by a 480 hp (360 kW) Bristol Jupiter VIII radial engine, was first flown on 7 September 1928.[1] The record attempt was abandoned and the aircraft was then modified to be used by Bert Hinkler for a world flight.[1] The world flight was also abandoned and the aircraft was used by Bristol as an engine test bed for the Jupiter XIF engine.[1] The Type 109 was scrapped in 1931, never having flown beyond the UK.[1][2]

Specifications[edit]

Data from [2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 37 ft 9 in (11.51 m)
  • Wingspan: 51 ft 2 in (15.6 m)
  • Height: 14 ft 0 in (4.27 m)
  • Wing area: 700 ft2 (65.0 m2)
  • Empty weight: 4,600 lb (2,085 kg)
  • Gross weight: 9,800 lb (4,445 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Bristol Jupiter VIII piston radial engine, 480 hp (358 kW)

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 90 mph (145 km/h)
  • Range: 3,300 miles (5,300 km)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Jackson 1973, page 308
  2. ^ a b Barnes 1964, p. 234

References[edit]

  • Barnes, C.H. (1964). Bristol Aircraft since 1910. London: Putnam Publishing. ISBN 0-370-00015-3. 
  • Jackson, A.J. (1973). British Civil Aircraft since 1919 Volume 1. London: Putnam. ISBN 0-370-10006-9.