British Academy Television Craft Awards

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British Academy Television Craft Awards
2013 British Academy Television Craft Awards
Awarded for "to recognise, honour and reward individuals for outstanding achievement in television craft."[1]
Country  United Kingdom
Presented by British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA)
First awarded 2000 (for productions of 1999)
Official website Official website

The British Academy Television Craft Awards is an accolade presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), a charitable organisation established in 1947, which: "supports, promotes and develops the art forms of the moving image - film, television and video games - by identifying and rewarding excellence, inspiring practitioners and benefiting the public."[2]

Having previously been handed out with the British Academy Television Awards, the awards were established in 2000 as a way to spotlight technical achievements, without being overshadowed by the production categories.[3]

Rules[edit]

To be eligible for nomination, programmes must be: broadcast in the UK between the eligibility period, on terrestrial, cable, satellite or digital channels; both a financial and creative contribution in the case of an international programme, and have its first broadcast in the UK; an entry for the television awards first (not previously entered for the film or children's awards).[4] The top six programmes and/or individuals in each category are chosen by television voting members and Chapter members in three rounds, to make up the jury shortlist. The shortlist then goes forward to a jury, who decides the top four final nominees and the winners.[5]

Ceremonies[edit]

In the following table, the years correspond to the year the ceremony took place, and are held for achievements of the previous year (e.g. the 2000 awards are celebrated for television productions of 1999).

Date[A] Venue City State Host Ref.
30 April 2000 195 Piccadilly Westminster London Gabby Logan [6]
22 April 2001 Sadler's Wells Theatre Islington London Liza Tarbuck [7][8]
12 May 2002 Savoy Hotel Westminster London Harry Enfield [9]
11 May 2003 The Dorchester Mayfair London Alistair McGowan [10][11]
16 May 2004 The Dorchester Mayfair London [12][13]
8 May 2005 The Dorchester Mayfair London Jon Culshaw [14][15]
19 May 2006 The Dorchester Mayfair London [16]
22 April 2007 The Dorchester Mayfair London Jon Snow [17]
11 May 2008 The Dorchester Mayfair London Claudia Winkleman [18]
17 May 2009 Hilton Hotel, London Mayfair London Alexander Armstrong [19][20]
23 May 2010 Hilton Hotel, London Mayfair London Christine Bleakley [21]
8 May 2011 The Brewery City of London London Stephen Mangan [22][23]
13 May 2012 The Brewery City of London London Alan Davies [24]
28 April 2013 The Brewery City of London London Stephen Mangan [25]

^[A] Each year is linked to the full list of Television Craft winners and nominees that year.

Categories[edit]

As of 2012, the awards include twelve competitive categories:[26]

  • Breakthrough Talent
  • Costume Design
  • Digital Creativity
  • Director – Factual
  • Director – Fiction
  • Director - Multi-Camera
  • Editing – Factual
  • Editing – Fiction
  • Entertainment Craft Team
  • Makeup and Hair Design
  • Original Music
  • Photography – Factual
  • Photography and Lighting – Fiction
  • Production Design
  • Sound – Factual
  • Sound – Fiction
  • Visual and Graphic Effects
  • Writer - Comedy
  • Writer - Drama

A Special Award is also presented, at the discretion of the Television Committee, which "honour[s] an individual or a team of craftspeople for outstanding creative contribution in the craft sector."[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Introduction (page three)". British Academy Television Craft Awards - Rules and Guidelines 2012/2013. British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  2. ^ "British Academy of Film and Television Arts - About us". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  3. ^ Staff (7 April 2009). "Craft Awards: Ten Years of Talent - Craft Awards - Television - The BAFTA site". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "Eligibility (page five)". British Academy Television Craft Awards - Rules and Guidelines 2012/2013. British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  5. ^ "Voting process (page twelve)". British Academy Television Craft Awards - Rules and Guidelines 2012/2013. British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  6. ^ Staff (3 April 2000). "BBC dominates awards shortlist". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  7. ^ Staff (22 April 2001). "Longitude wins Bafta hat-trick". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  8. ^ "BFI - Film & TV Database - BAFTA Craft Awards 2001". British Film Institute (BFI). Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  9. ^ "Awards - Television Events". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Archived from the original on 11 August 2002. Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  10. ^ Staff (12 May 2003). "BBC programmes take eight BAFTA Craft Awards". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  11. ^ Staff (12 May 2003). "Period dramas win Baftas". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  12. ^ Staff (17 May 2004). "State of Play wins craft Baftas". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  13. ^ Staff (18 May 2004). "'Sea Monsters' trilogy wins BAFTA Craft Award for Framestore". 4rfv.co.uk. Flagship Media Group Ltd. Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  14. ^ Staff (9 May 2005). "Sex Traffic dominates TV awards". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  15. ^ "BAFTA: Winners & Nominees". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Archived from the original on 11 May 2005. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  16. ^ Staff. "The British Academy Television Craft Awards - Winners Announced". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Archived from the original on 13 June 2006. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  17. ^ Staff (28 September 2007). "Television Craft Awards Winners in 2007". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  18. ^ Deborah Goodman (29 April 2008). "Star-Studded Craft Line Up". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  19. ^ Leigh Holmwood (6 April 2009). "BBC1's Little Dorrit and Wallander lead Bafta craft award nominations". The Guardian (Guardian News and Media Limited). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  20. ^ "Winners announced". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  21. ^ Jason Deans (24 May 2010). "Mo and Red Riding lead winners at Bafta Craft Awards". The Guardian (Guardian News and Media Limited). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  22. ^ Catriona Wightman (12 April 2011). "In Full: BAFTA TV Craft Awards 2011 - Nominees". Digital Spy (Hearst Magazines UK (National Magazine Company Ltd.)). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  23. ^ "British Academy Television Craft Awards Winners Announced". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  24. ^ Goodacre, Kate (14 May 2012). "BAFTA TV Craft Awards 2012 winners - in full". Digital Spy (Hearst Magazines UK (National Magazine Company Ltd.)). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  25. ^ "Television Craft Awards: Nominations Announced". BAFTA. 25 March 2013. Retrieved 25 March 2013. 
  26. ^ a b "Award categories (page eight)". British Academy Television Craft Awards - Rules and Guidelines 2012/2013. British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 4 December 2012. 

External links[edit]