British Columbia Children's Hospital

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This article is about the British Columbia Children's Hospital. For other similarly named hospitals, see Children's Hospital (disambiguation).
B.C. Children's Hospital
British Columbia Children's Hospital is located in Vancouver
British Columbia Children's Hospital
Location in Vancouver
Geography
Location 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Coordinates 49°14′40″N 123°07′32″W / 49.244444°N 123.125556°W / 49.244444; -123.125556Coordinates: 49°14′40″N 123°07′32″W / 49.244444°N 123.125556°W / 49.244444; -123.125556
Organization
Care system Public Medicare (Canada) (MSP)
Hospital type Tertiary Pediatric Care
Affiliated university UBC Faculty of Medicine
Services
Emergency department Yes
Helipad TC LID: CAK7
History
Founded 1928
Links
Website www.bcchildrens.ca
Lists Hospitals in Canada
Other links BC Women's Hospital & Health Centre

British Columbia Children's Hospital is a medical facility located in Vancouver, British Columbia, and is an agency of the Provincial Health Services Authority. It specializes in health care for patients from birth to age 17. It is also a teaching and research facility for children's medicine. The hospital also operates the Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children, which provides specialized services to children and youth with developmental disabilities aged birth to 19.

The hospital is adjacent to the B.C. Women's Hospital & Health Centre. Previously, the two were officially a single organization and were known as the Children's & Women's Health Centre of British Columbia.[1]

Working with the hospital and the community, the BC Children's Hospital Foundation raises funds to support and enhance the delivery of pediatric care in British Columbia. The Foundation provides funding to B.C. Children’s Hospital, as well as its sister facilities, the Child & Family Research Institute and Sunny Hill Health Centre, to support research into childhood diseases, the purchase of medical equipment, and a range of child health education and training programs.

History[edit]

B.C. Children’s Hospital's roots go back to the establishment of a fund for crippled children by the B.C. Women’s Institute in 1923.[2] In 1928, Vancouver’s Crippled Children’s Hospital admited its first patient at its Hudson Street location.[2] In 1933, a new Crippled Children’s Hospital opened on West 59th Avenue.[2] In 1947, it was renamed Children’s Hospital "to exemplify the growing awareness that children are not defined by their illnesses."[2]

In 1977, ground was broken at the hospital's current location at West 28th Avenue and Oak Street, some time after the Children’s Hospital and the Health Centre for Children had agreed to the construction of a joint facility in 1964.[2] Construction was completed in 1982 at a cost of $60 million. The 29,730 square-metre facility housed 250 acute care beds, an adolescent unit, a modern isolation facility, a rehabilitation unit, a 10-bed psychiatric unit and a 60-bed special care nursery.[3]

In 1985, the Children’s Variety Research Centre opened, showing the increasing importance placed on medical research.[2]

In 2002, the Medical Day Unit was expanded from four to twelve beds, providing family-centred care for children with complex medical problems.[4]

In 2003, a $28 million expansion saw the opening of a new Ambulatory Care Building, for the increasing numbers of patients not needing to stay overnight.[5] The building tripled the number of clinic rooms available on site for patients and staff, and houses 24 pediatric specialty medical and surgical clinics.[5] The architects state that the building "is nearly 40% more efficient than the National Energy Code called for when it was built. Sustainable design features include orientation toward solar exposure, maximization of natural ventilation and natural daylight, concourse ventilation, insulated north walls, reduction in electrical power consumption through daylighting, task lighting, and light and occupancy sensors."[6] The project also involved the nearby B.C. Women's Hospital & Health Centre's new Maternity and Ambulatory Program Clinics, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Emergency renovation and expansion.[6]

In 2005, two inpatient units were upgraded and modernized in a $6.9-million project.[2] In 2007, the oncology unit was redeveloped and renamed the Djavad Mowafaghian Wing, after its donor provided $6 million for the project.[7]

In 2007, a new $19-million Mental Health Building opened. "It was the first freestanding facility of its kind dedicated to youth mental health in Canada. The modernized 4-story facility serves children and adolescents with serious mental health challenges from all across the province. Services such as emergency care, long term psychiatric care, an outreach program, as well as a significant area for assessment and training are provided".[8]

In 2008, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) was renovated in a $4.4-million project to enhance family and staff areas and improve the unit’s capacity to care for children who require strict isolation.[2] The British Columbia Ministry of Health Services also provided $2.8 million for renovations to the radiology department and new diagnostic equipment, two molecular-imaging gamma cameras: "One camera is a hybrid SPECT/CT, a gamma camera combined with a six-slice CT scanner that provides overlaid images. These fused images provide physicians with a more accurate picture of what’s going on inside patients, enabling more effective treatment. For many patients, it can mean one hospital visit instead of two."[2]

New acute care centre[edit]

In 2014, construction began on the new Teck Acute Care Centre, a $676 million project in three phases to build "an eight-storey facility, approximately 59,400 square metres (640,000 square feet) in size. The facility will be designed to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold standard and include extensive use of wood, consistent with the Province of B.C.’s Wood First Act."[9] The building "will be a bright, modern facility with single-occupant patient rooms, access to natural light and gardens. It includes medical/surgical inpatient units, an emergency department, medical imaging and procedural suites, a hematology/oncology department and a pediatric intensive care unit for BC Children’s Hospital. There will also be a high-risk labour and delivery suite and a new neonatal intensive care unit for BC Women’s Hospital + Health Centre."[9]

Facilities and amenities[edit]

B.C. Children’s Hospital offers a broad range of inpatient, outpatient and tertiary care for children from birth to adolescence. This includes clinics, emergency services, pediatric health care, surgery, intensive care, transplants, genetics, and an HIV centre.

SunnyHillHCsign.jpg

B.C. Children’s Hospital is affiliated with the UBC Faculty of Medicine and serves as a teaching hospital for infant and pediatric care. B.C. Children’s Hospital, along with the B.C. Women's Hospital & Health Centre, are also the home of the Child and Family Research Institute.[10]

Sunny Hill entrance.jpg

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Welcome. Please take a moment to update your bookmarks as we have made some changes to our website addresses.", Children's & Women's Health Centre of British Columbia, accessed Sept. 20, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "History", B.C. Children's Hospital, accessed Sept. 20, 2014.
  3. ^ The Chuck Davis History of Metropolitan Vancouver. Harbour Publishing. 2012. p. 409. 
  4. ^ "What we do", B.C. Children's Hospital, accessed Sept. 20, 2014.
  5. ^ a b "B.C. Children's Hospital Welcomes New Arrival", B.C. Children's Hospital, Feb. 6, 2003.
  6. ^ a b "B.C. Children's Ambulatory Care Centre", Henriquez Partners Architects, accessed Sept. 20, 2014.
  7. ^ "Mowafaghian donates $4 million to SFU", Simon Fraser University, August 30, 2010.
  8. ^ "Partners: The Mental Health Building at B.C. Children's Hospital", The Kelty Patrick Dennehy Foundation, accessed Sept. 20, 2014.
  9. ^ a b "New Teck Acute Care Centre for B.C.'s children moves forward", Province of British Columbia, May 9, 2014.
  10. ^ "About us", Child and Family Research Institute, accessed Sept. 20, 2014.

External links[edit]