British Columbia Highway 7A

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Highway 7A shield

Highway 7A
Route information
Length: 26 km (16 mi)
Existed: 1953 – 2006
Major junctions
From: Seymour Street in Vancouver
To: Lougheed Highway in Coquitlam
Location
Major cities: Vancouver
Burnaby
Port Moody
Coquitlam
Highway system

British Columbia provincial highways

BC 7 BC 7B

Highway 7A, was known locally and on street signs as the Barnet Highway and Hastings Street, was Highway 7's original 1941 route between the harbour in Vancouver and Port Moody. The highway gained the 7A designation in 1953 and was disestablished in 2006.

Route Details[edit]

The 26 km (16 mi) long Highway 7A largely followed a parallel route alongside the Canadian Pacific Railway. The highway started off in the west at Seymour Street in Downtown Vancouver, and went 8 km (5 mi) along Hastings Street, passing its junction with Highway 1 en route, until it reached Boundary Road, where the highway crossed into Burnaby. Highway 7A continued east along Hastings Street in Burnaby for 5 km (3 mi) before turning northeast via Inlet Drive onto Barnet Highway. Once Hastings Street terminates the road narrows from 6 lanes to four, and the speed limit is upped from 50 to 80 km/h (from 31 to 50 mph). Barnet Highway carried Highway 7A on a winding 9 km (6 mi) long route on the south shore of Burrard Inlet through Burnaby and into Port Moody, where it meets an intersection with St. John's Street. Highway 7A then travelled 5 km (3 mi) east along St. Johns Street to its junctions with Dewdney Trunk Road and Ioco Road, after which it bears the street name Barnet Highway again, before terminating at its junction with Highway 7 in Coquitlam.

Despite the highway being decommissioned a number of years ago, as of March 2012 Highway 7A signage was still visible along Hastings Street in downtown Vancouver.